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-   -   Help...Mold in New Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/help-mold-new-construction-176653/)

Hawkeye Country 04-09-2013 08:44 AM

Help...Mold in New Construction
 
We're just finishing up building a new house that we started last September. It's just been sitting with house wrap on the exterior walls waiting for warmer weather to brick it. I pulled some insulation away from the exterior wall in the unfinished walkout basement and there's mold. The water is soaking into the house wrap, seemingly through the staple holes, and wetting the osb. I'm not worried about this happening once the brick is on, but I need to get this dried out and mold removed. How big of a deal is this and how do I remedy it? Thanks in advance. :(

jagans 04-09-2013 08:49 AM

What makes you think that water does not go through brick? Sorry, it does.

joecaption 04-09-2013 08:51 AM

I hardly think a few staple holes is causing that much water coming inside.
Got some pictures of the outside?
Were all the seams taped?

Windows on Wash 04-09-2013 08:58 AM

+1

Water coming in is usually the result of poor flashing and construction.

How about some pictures?

Hawkeye Country 04-09-2013 09:07 AM

Sorry, I don't have pics right now. The seams were not taped, but there are no vertical seems, only horizontal and they're overlapped. This was done by the framing contractor who has a reputation for building quality, fairly high-end houses, so I presume he hasn't had this issue before. I guess I'll have to talk to him about it. Is the mold easy to get rid of?

Also, the mold spots are not near windows or other openings, just tall exposed walls.

Edit: I talked to the contractor and he said it happens the first winter if there's no brick because frost gets on the walls and comes through. He said it's no big deal, pull insulation out to dry it out and spray it with bleach. Thoughts?

Windows on Wash 04-09-2013 09:45 AM

Brick is veneer in this case and nothing from the structural wall should be touching the brick.

No moisture transference at that point if there is no contact.

Are their weep/vent holes on the brick?

Pulling out the wall and insulation doesn't address what caused the issue in the first place and I still suspect it is a bulk moisture issue as compared to a humidity/frost issue.

Hawkeye Country 04-09-2013 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows on Wash (Post 1155338)
Brick is veneer in this case and nothing from the structural wall should be touching the brick.

No moisture transference at that point if there is no contact.

Are their weep/vent holes on the brick?

Pulling out the wall and insulation doesn't address what caused the issue in the first place and I still suspect it is a bulk moisture issue as compared to a humidity/frost issue.

Currently the brick isn't on the wall, they are just starting to brick it as we've had a cold spring, and haven't gotten to this wall yet. Perhaps I wasn't clear in my original post. Where they did start the brick it's not touching the wall so I don't forsee a tranfer of moisture from brick to framing.

Nailbags 04-09-2013 12:12 PM

so it has been sitting there since september? and you do know that the house wrap is only good for 90 days exposed right? you do know that your to use the tar flashing tape on all the sheathing seams right? and why are you having insulation in the walls before the exterior is done? because your not dried in. you need to dry in your home first before really working on the interior.

Hawkeye Country 04-09-2013 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nailbags (Post 1155398)
so it has been sitting there since september? and you do know that the house wrap is only good for 90 days exposed right? you do know that your to use the tar flashing tape on all the sheathing seams right? and why are you having insulation in the walls before the exterior is done? because your not dried in. you need to dry in your home first before really working on the interior.

No I didn't know that. It's pretty common around here the start a house in the fall, finish the inside throughout the winter, and brick in the spring. There are a couple other houses in the area going up the same way right now. What is the preferred practice when starting a house in the fall when its too cold to brick?

Seattle2k 04-09-2013 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hawkeye Country (Post 1155328)
Edit: I talked to the contractor and he said it happens the first winter if there's no brick because frost gets on the walls and comes through. He said it's no big deal, pull insulation out to dry it out and spray it with bleach. Thoughts?


Bleach doesn't kill mold.
http://www.jpmoldcontrol.com/faq/why...ach-work.shtml
http://www.normi.org/articles/bleach-mold.php

I use Concrobium or Sporicide.

Windows on Wash 04-09-2013 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seattle2k (Post 1155419)

+1

Common misconception.

It does do a pretty good job of interrupting the growth cycle but it does not render mold completely dead.

Nailbags 04-09-2013 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hawkeye Country (Post 1155412)
No I didn't know that. It's pretty common around here the start a house in the fall, finish the inside throughout the winter, and brick in the spring. There are a couple other houses in the area going up the same way right now. What is the preferred practice when starting a house in the fall when its too cold to brick?

I am not a mason so I have no clue to brick laying. I just do hardi plank siding and call it good. but yes pull out the insulation and dry out the area and use a fungicide or sporicide to kill the mold Good luck with your project and hope it helps.

jagans 04-09-2013 10:22 PM

Brick is not a barrier wall, and has to be installed as a water-managed system, where water is allowed to go through the brick and mortar, run down the back of the brick, hit a flashing and exit out of the system through weep holes. Proper flashings and end dams have to be provided above all openings like windows and doors, and at brick ledge. Correcting Improper construction of brick veneer walls is extremely expensive, so I suggest you get yourself educated real quick.

Gary in WA 04-09-2013 11:37 PM

It sounds like moisture from the basement air is condensing on the "first condensing surface" cold enough; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...bout-diffusion

I'd talk to the builder about using some rigid foamboard, at least on the sunny-side;http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...n-brick-veneer

Per code, you are good with the ventilated air-space to the future brick, but remember, code is "minimum"- like a passing "D" in school; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...r-requirements

The drainage plane behind the brick veneer; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...d-wall-systems

You will continue to get mold on the inside of sheathing without a vapor barrier/retarder/air-tight drywall as f.g. is air/vapor permeable (think furnace filter), degree depends on location, where are you, in general?

Gary

Nailbags 04-10-2013 02:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1155816)
Brick is not a barrier wall, and has to be installed as a water-managed system, where water is allowed to go through the brick and mortar, run down the back of the brick, hit a flashing and exit out of the system through weep holes. Proper flashings and end dams have to be provided above all openings like windows and doors, and at brick ledge. Correcting Improper construction of brick veneer walls is extremely expensive, so I suggest you get yourself educated real quick.

hey thanks good to know thanks for sharing.


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