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Old 10-17-2011, 10:26 AM   #16
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


Cutting the notches and pouring the footings DIY was more of a cost decision than anything, would the cost of hiring a professional to cut two feet of the slab and repouring it with the required footers make more sense?

I'm trying to strike a balance between cost and aesthetics, and although I do not have any estimates on the demo and repouring of 52' x 2', for the time being I am going to assume it will be significantly more expensive than DIY cut and pour of the five footings alone.

Would the possible cracks that form at the new inside corners of the existing slab pose more than just an aesthetic problem? Am I overlooking any more options barring the extension of my span beyond the existing slab?

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Old 10-17-2011, 10:32 AM   #17
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


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Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
Fortunatly, I own a concrete chainsaw, so I have the ability to saw perfect square w/o overcutting. Drilled a tapcon in the center of each, and simply grabbed the tapcon with the claws of a hammer and pulled it out w/o resistance.
I see that concrete chain saws are available for rental as well. Would this be an option you would recommend for a homeowner?
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Old 10-17-2011, 10:48 AM   #18
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


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I see that concrete chain saws are available for rental as well. Would this be an option you would recommend for a homeowner?
Tough call and here's why:

Ideally, you'll still need a 14" concrete handheld saw, ideally with a standard width blade. Then, to keep the wider chain from binding, ideally you want .220 wide cut-off blade. These are undoubtedly a specialty blade, and you probably won't find it at a rental yard but you could ask. Then, you finish the cuts off with the chainsaw. The reason for this process is that the chainsaw doesn't cut very straight, and when it wanders off, it binds and cuts much slower. Not to mention that the chainsaws cut extremely slow compared to a handheld. Then, you've got some serious rental fees as well. Here's a rough quesstimate: Handheld saw with std. 14" blade ~$100, "fat blade", assuming they have one ~$75 or so?, chainsaw with chain wear charges ~$300-400. So, maybe $500-600 or so just to DIY and avoid overcutting.

If you're not overly concerned about the asthetics, here's what I'd likely do:

Rent the 14" handheld, mark out the 5 squares as "diamonds", or simply squares turned on a 45 degree angle. This allows you to saw a control joint between the corners of each square, and to each edge of the slab. Highly unlikely you'd see any random cracking if you did this.

Here's a sketch that may help with my poor explanation (hopefully you can saw straighter than I can sketch.......):

Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings-patio-post.jpg


The red is your 18" squares, the yellow is the house or edge of patio, the green is the control joints.
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:06 AM   #19
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


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Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
If you're not overly concerned about the asthetics, here's what I'd likely do:

Rent the 14" handheld, mark out the 5 squares as "diamonds", or simply squares turned on a 45 degree angle. This allows you to saw a control joint between the corners of each square, and to each edge of the slab. Highly unlikely you'd see any random cracking if you did this.
Thanks for taking the time to explain your suggestion and even make the sketch, I appreciate it..

I'm thinking that your suggestion would probably not work in my case because of the location of the holes being on the edge of the existing slab. Here is a diagram showing the location of the required post footings.



I'm thinking the may not be enough meat left on the edge of the patio if I were to turn those squares on a 45.
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:19 AM   #20
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


Well, that's even easier than I thought, as long as you can pull out some of the pavers next to the slab. You probably won't need to overcut the squares in your scenario, as sawed squares won't be locked into the middle of the slab. I'd just saw the squares and try to bust them out, starting at the slab edge & working inward. No need to worry about control joints either in this scenario IMO.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:42 PM   #21
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Help Interpreting Town Standard on Concrete Footings


Just thought I would update this thread with what I ended up doing..

As it turned out, 4 of 5 new footings were on top of, old existing footings, so a call to 5 concrete cutters netted me three opinions, one guy said he had no idea how to cut out a footing that could be up to 16" thick, the next guy suggested negotiating with the city to let me core 12" holes into the existing footings and use that for the new anchor at $500, and the third guy figured it would take a day with a saw and jack hammer, and set me back $1000.

None of these solutions were reasonable for me, as I work a full time job, and I really don't have the vacation time to take off from work to discuss alternatives with the inspector on their hours, and $1000 for demo just is going to work..

So I went down to the old home store and rented a 14" handheld circular concrete saw with blade for $70 (No one local rents masonry chain saws). I cut the new footing holes in the existing slab in about 20 minutes. All holes required a pretty decent overcut, but I'm going cheap, so I knew I would have to sacrifice pretty.

With that done, I went back and rented the 75lb jack hammer for $50, and did the hard work. It took about two hours, but everything broke up well, and I really had no problem demoing the portion of the concrete footings that the 14" saw was unable to reach. I just put the spade bit in there against the edge of the cut hole and made sure to crack the footing as close to the edge as possible. Try to keep the jack hammer from implanting itself to deep into your hole, I practically gave myself a hernia trying to pull it back out at times.



Next up, dig out the concrete chunks, and dig the hole to the new footing specs. Then its first inspection time.

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