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Old 03-08-2011, 05:56 PM   #1
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help with demolition


I recently purchased a home and want to remove a wooden gazebo / spa enclosure to reclaim some outdoor space. Besides disconnecting and removing the plumbing and electrical, I am looking for some help and advice. Its about 6'x6' and is made of 2x4s and 4x4s and seems pretty well constructed.

What should I use to section it? Sawzall? Chainsaw?
Where to start?
Is there a strategy to getting to roof off?
Any other helpful tips...?

We plan on being very safe and I have quite a few strong friends coming over to help, but I am at a bit of a loss as to how to go about it.

Thanks in advance,
Todd

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Old 03-08-2011, 06:06 PM   #2
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That will be a quick job if you have a Sawsall and Milwaukee blades---The Axe or even their regular blades will cut wood and nails---I suggest UN-building it----Cut the nails and fasteners with the Sawsall

where they are joined---some metal cutting blades might be needed--and simply take it apart the way it went together. Roof first---then joists then beam work--then uprights,--Mike--

(cheap blades don't last--as soon as they get hot they fold up and quit cutting--Milwaukee-Lenox--Starret--only good brands I know of)

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Old 03-08-2011, 06:07 PM   #3
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Only 6'x6' isn't very big. Can you and your strong friends flip it over onto its side, then you could easily seperate the roof from the deck. Maybe pull it over with a truck or come-along. Start tilting it with a floor jack to get it going. Otherwise, you will have to start from the top down and start removing the roofing material.


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Old 03-08-2011, 06:25 PM   #4
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- Gloves, glasses, long pants and shirts.

- If you are going to have to cut the 6x6s I would recommend the chainsaw, if you have one available - the reciprocating saw will work, just take longer.

- Get yourself a set of pry-bars in various sizes and a sledge or two.

- Plan NOW for how you are going to dispose of the debris. In my county you cannot put construction debris in the trash. So this may leave you hauling it to the dump or paying someone else to do it. I rented a small roll-off this winter for some demolition and it was well worth the money.

- Mike's suggestion is a good safe way to go. But in my experience, when a guy and 'a few strong friends' get together to demolish something it usually means yanking it down with someone's truck. I would suggest getting some stout chain or tow cables if you think you are going to go this route. Save the beer for afterwards and be safe.

- Good luck. This sort of demo is a lot of work, but fun and satisfying.
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
... in my experience, when a guy and 'a few strong friends' get together to demolish something it usually means yanking it down with someone's truck. I would suggest getting some stout chain or tow cables if you think you are going to go this route. Save the beer for afterwards and be safe.
snort snort
MORE POWER!!! Yank that baby down with a steel cable and a one-ton-dooley, won't take thirty seconds to have that baby on the ground. No reason to wait on the beer either. Ah-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!!!
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:15 PM   #6
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Thanks for the great replies so far. Pulling it down with a truck wont work though because of how its located at the back of the lot.

It is very cool that I now have an excuse to go buy a chainsaw and a sawzall ('but honey... the guys on the internet said I had too').

Thanks internet buddies!
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tschoenb View Post
Thanks for the great replies so far. Pulling it down with a truck wont work though because of how its located at the back of the lot.

It is very cool that I now have an excuse to go buy a chainsaw and a sawzall ('but honey... the guys on the internet said I had too').

Thanks internet buddies!
Tell her you need the right tools to do the job safely.

The first thing I bought after my husband and I bought our house was a chain saw. If I had it to do again I would have gotten a slightly bigger one. I bought the small 'homeowner' stihl. Would have liked a bigger bar.

I would also recommend a fein multimaster over a recip-saw. I have both and always use my Fein and never use my recip. But it might be because I'm a chick and not as strong so the recip saw tends to get away from me.... Also the Fein is multipurpose.
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:53 PM   #8
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Here are the best photos I have of the thing:
Attached Thumbnails
help with demolition-untitled-1.jpg   help with demolition-untitled-2.jpg  
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:01 PM   #9
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I'll add several flat pry bars--a couple of 3# hand mauls and a couple more packs of sawsall blades.

And leather gloves for everyone!
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:02 PM   #10
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Thanks for the pic. Make sure you take pics during the demo.

Because of your limited space you really will want to plan how you are going to deal with the debris. It will very quickly take over your work space so you will have to move it as you work.

Same goes for safety issues - the small area you'll be working in means more people working in a smaller footprint = higher risk.

- Remember that just because you can fill a trash can with demo debris doesn't mean you'll be able to lift it full.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:12 PM   #11
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This job calls for some C-4.

Positioned correctly and enough of it the debris will become the neighbors problem.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:59 PM   #12
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Be EXTREMELY careful if using a chain saw in lumber that contains nails! Nails can break the chain and then the chain can fly around till the operator's arm, leg or neck stops it. I know it's not fun but the safest way to demo is to carefully unbuild.

A sawzall is more than enough to cut a 4X4. Use good quality blades as mentioned earlier by Mike


Last edited by daveb1; 03-09-2011 at 08:00 AM. Reason: second paragraph
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