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Old 09-19-2008, 02:00 PM   #1
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Gutter Elbow Question


Anybody see any issues with using 4 elbows to route water from the downspouts into an existing corrugated pipe that runs underground?

From the 3" downspout, I would use two "B" style elbows to shift the water to the right side, and then use two "A" style elbows (coming towards you) to fit directly over the corrugated piping.

Aluminum elbows will be screwed together and braced against a brick wall.

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Old 09-19-2008, 02:32 PM   #2
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I think just about every downspout on my own home is put up that way. The only thing I do is to use pop rivets where I can. The leaves that get in them don't catch as quick as they will on a screw point. Where you have to use screws to get things apart later, use the shortest you can get.

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Old 09-19-2008, 02:45 PM   #3
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Where are you located (climatewise)?

I have a similar system except just two elbows and straight down the leader from below grade. It works great is the summer. My only probelem was the corrugated pipe that clogs easily from debris unless you have strong flushing flows and a good outlet.

I tore out my buried corrugated pipe (20' with a pop-up) and replaced with it with 20' of solid pvc and then 10' of perforated pvc to daylight.

Also, if you have corrugated and can't keep it reasonably clean if you are in a cold climate, you can easily get a freeze-up and will have to disconnect. I have been lucky despite the 4' frost depth because mine (12" to 24" deep) runs in the yard that usually has some (not much) snow cover and has no traffic over it.
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Old 09-19-2008, 02:45 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
I think just about every downspout on my own home is put up that way. The only thing I do is to use pop rivets where I can. The leaves that get in them don't catch as quick as they will on a screw point. Where you have to use screws to get things apart later, use the shortest you can get.
Home Depot carries 1/2" and 3/16" length gutter screws. I wonder why they would offer two sizes since elbows fit together about the same way.

Since this gutter drains into underground corrugated piping, I plan to use one of those gutter strainers to keep leaves out at the downspout. Therefore, no leaves should ever get into the actual downspout.

I may even remove the gutter strainer after Fall to allow better flow of water, but I definitely want to keep leaves out since the piping travels quite a distance underground before the outlet.
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Old 09-19-2008, 02:50 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Where are you located (climatewise)?

I have a similar system except just two elbows and straight down the leader from below grade. It works great is the summer. My only probelem was the corrugated pipe that clogs easily from debris unless you have strong flushing flows and a good outlet.

I tore out my buried corrugated pipe (20' with a pop-up) and replaced with it with 20' of solid pvc and then 10' of perforated pvc to daylight.

Also, if you have corrugated and can't keep it reasonably clean if you are in a cold climate, you can easily get a freeze-up and will have to disconnect. I have been lucky despite the 4' frost depth because mine (12" to 24" deep) runs in the yard that usually has some (not much) snow cover and has no traffic over it.
I'm located in Northern Va. Definitely not as cold as Minn.

I too worry about freeze up anyway, especially if leaves are clogged, which is why I plan to put in a gutter strainer at this downspout until all leaves are gone from the trees. After that, I may venture back up on the ladder to remove it.

Why did you go with perforated PVC at the end, and what is the purpose of the popup? Is it to allow water to escape if the pipe is clogged downstream?
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Old 09-19-2008, 03:51 PM   #6
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I used smooth pvc because it will not plug as easy. I used perforated on the last 10' to distribute the water into the rock and soil around the pvc. I pur a screen over the end of the pvc to keep out critters and to let any excess out.

I used a pop-up (which is neat) after I got far enough away from a patio to ground. I then extended the smooth pvc to where there was more of a drop.

A strainer does not stop everything. You will always have small wind-borne debris, leaves the break roofing granuals and general dirt going down the downspout even with a strainer.

We only have problems in the winter when we do not have enough snow, which is all too common. We get much less snow than people think and it is usually not the kind of wet, nasty stuff you do.
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Old 09-19-2008, 06:54 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
I used smooth pvc because it will not plug as easy. I used perforated on the last 10' to distribute the water into the rock and soil around the pvc. I pur a screen over the end of the pvc to keep out critters and to let any excess out.

I used a pop-up (which is neat) after I got far enough away from a patio to ground. I then extended the smooth pvc to where there was more of a drop.

A strainer does not stop everything. You will always have small wind-borne debris, leaves the break roofing granuals and general dirt going down the downspout even with a strainer.

We only have problems in the winter when we do not have enough snow, which is all too common. We get much less snow than people think and it is usually not the kind of wet, nasty stuff you do.
The "funny" thing is that earlier this year, my gutters were clogged and I thought it was leaves.

When I got up there, I saw no leaves.

The previous owner of almost 9 years had strainers too, and the strainers were clogged with sludge. Also, there was a tennis ball up there. Neighborhood kids seem to like to use the gutter as a basketball hoop.

Do you use chicken wire to screen the outlet?

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