DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Garage storage in rafters? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/garage-storage-rafters-167981/)

kirwinjd 01-01-2013 09:10 PM

Garage storage in rafters?
 
Any way of determining how much weight the rafters above a garage can hold? I put several sheets of 1/2" plywood up there and
as I shove more stuff up there I'm becoming increasingly concerned that I'm putting too much weight on the joists. I'm trying to move the heavier stuff towards the load bearing walls but I know either way, the garage rafters weren't made for a storage area.

Thank you

joecaption 01-01-2013 09:41 PM

That's the spans, spacing and size of the joist?

MJ Force 01-02-2013 07:15 PM

Are these rafters part of a roof truss system? Are these engineered truss's*.
Typically a roof truss system is designed to accept the weight of a finished ceiling. However the material would be evenly distributed. Loading material unevenly could cause deflection to the roof or worse, failure of a joint.
If you call a Roof Truss Builder and describe the specs and design they may suggest some ways which you could "beef them up". There are several design to pitched roof trusses ie; web, king post etc.

kirwinjd 01-02-2013 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1084296)
That's the spans, spacing and size of the joist?

Thanks for the reply.
Joists are 2x4, mostly spaced at 24", a few spaced at 14". Dimensions are 20'x25'. Looks like all the joists were lengthened with a web nail plate and a short block on top. Definitely a pre made truss design. House is only a 12 year old track home

kirwinjd 01-02-2013 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MJ Force (Post 1084888)
Are these rafters part of a roof truss system? Are these engineered truss's*.
Typically a roof truss system is designed to accept the weight of a finished ceiling. However the material would be evenly distributed. Loading material unevenly could cause deflection to the roof or worse, failure of a joint.
If you call a Roof Truss Builder and describe the specs and design they may suggest some ways which you could "beef them up". There are several design to pitched roof trusses ie; web, king post etc.

Great thanks for the info. It's definitely a pre engineered, per built truss system. My house is one of about 200 of the same model built in the neighborhood.
My other reply describes the construction of the garage.

Question: if I was to exceed the design capacity, would I get any warning of an imminent collapse? Since the house and garage are joined together would that
Cause any damage to the house itself? My main concern is that I'm about to reload the garage rafters with a bunch of Christmas decorations, lights, ornaments etc.

Missouri Bound 01-02-2013 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kirwinjd (Post 1084269)
I know either way, the garage rafters weren't made for a storage area.

Thank you

...but you will do it anyway? :no:

GBrackins 01-03-2013 09:55 AM

got some photos you could post?

Hammer450R 01-04-2013 09:44 AM

They are not designed to store anything on.

kirwinjd 01-04-2013 09:47 PM

I'm going to hire a structural engineer to see if I can add some support to the trusses. I need as much storage area as possible and even though the trusses weren't designed for storage, it seems like everyone in the neighborhood does it anyway.
Thanks for the replys

AndyGump 01-05-2013 10:02 AM

I would love to see a picture of these things.

Andy.

Duckweather 01-05-2013 10:22 AM

Usually with engineered anything the warning you will get is a very loud crack about 4/5ths of a second before you hear the sound of a car being squashed. The proverbial straw and camel syndrome.

Daniel Holzman 01-05-2013 10:55 AM

A bit of terminology. You apparently have manufactured trusses. Assuming this is the case, you do not have rafters, and you do not have joists. The truss is a single unit, each individual piece is generally referred to as a truss element, and the specific parts of the truss have common names, for example the top pieces are often referred to as chords.

In any case, residential trusses are normally designed to be loaded at the connection points, called nodes. You will be loading between the connection points. It is certainly possible to analyze the effect of loading between the nodes, but this is not a simple analysis, and it is generally not a DIY calculation. In some cases, the manufacturer of the truss will tell you the maximum allowable uniform loading on the bottom chords of the truss, or they may simply tell you that your truss is not designed for any loading.

A few pictures would really help, as you may not have actual trusses.

Fix'n it 01-06-2013 09:31 AM

i did this with great success. but i will not comment without seeing pics.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:12 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved