Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-09-2012, 02:02 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Indiana
Posts: 30
Share |
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


So basically the two 2x10s are sandwiching a piece of half-inch plywood and that is supposed to act as a big "beam" which is apparently not enough.

So I'd need to somehow jack it up, remove this "beam" and replace with with something a lot beefier. My father in law is convinced he can do it, but I don't want the house falling in here. My guess is a better beam would be three 2x10s sandwiched together but I know nothing so...

kadetklapp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2012, 02:05 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Take a picture from outside with the camera at right angles to the door. It looks like your gutter is sagging as well close to the inside corner. Maybe there is some very localized damage at your wall/roof line.
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2012, 02:15 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Indiana
Posts: 30
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Here are a few more pictures. One thing I did want to mention is you notice the sag all the way up to the gutter, but beyond that you don't see it it. I've looked at the roof line every which way and see not issues at the pitch of the roof. It appears to be just fine. It's simply above the door to the soffits and gutter.






Here's what appears to be some old water damage. The roof is newer and appears to be just fine.

kadetklapp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2012, 02:21 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 103
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Is that a single top plate (2x4 on the flat)?

Daniel - do you see a prospect of modifying this to a composite section?
Marvel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2012, 02:42 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Indiana
Posts: 30
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


On top of the 2x10 above the door or up at the top? Above the 2x10 it's a single, up top I can't reach.
kadetklapp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2012, 11:32 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: British Columbia Canada
Posts: 460
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Check to see just how bowed that header is by running a string line under it and measuring the difference. If you determine that there is a ply between it I would think you may need to get an engineer to determine what is needed. My guess is there is nothing between those 2 by 10's. If that is the case then you may be able to replace the 2by10's with ply between them glued and screwed crown up.
fixrite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2012, 09:18 PM   #22
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 2
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Need to determine how many 2x10s, 2x10s plywood such as the filler piece between.In addition, measurement, 2X10, 2X10, in order to determine the exact height, they are usually HP 96 9-1/4 inches.
arigatou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2012, 07:41 AM   #23
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,121
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


It would be helpful to know where you are located, in terms of roof loading. Near as I can tell, you have a 10 foot long double 2x10 header, possibly with a piece of 1/2 inch plywood sandwiched between the 2x10's. This appears to be supporting only the roof, as I did not see any indication that there is storage being supported by the rafters.

I took a quick crack at some computations. I assumed the garage was 20 feet deep, you can confirm this. Using 40 psf roof load (heavy load based on snow, but then you never told us where you live) plus 10 psf dead load (no storage, framing load only) makes for 50 psf total. Assuming your header picks up half the load of the roof, that makes for 500 pounds/foot distributed load on the header.

Even at that load, which may be high (depends where you are located), the beam is probably structurally adequate (it is close). However, the deflection at midpoint would be a little less than half an inch, which should not be too noticeable. And the deflection would only occur if you got a major snowload condition.

To make more progress, you need to verify ALL the dimensions discussed, and tell us where you live.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2012, 09:29 AM   #24
Not so new
 
12penny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lehigh Valley, Pa.
Posts: 932
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


Hey Daniel....nice of you to spend your valuable time helping folks.

Went to some other threads of the op's and I think he's from Indiana. But where in Indiana is anyones guess.

And I'll bet ya lunch on the waterfront thats a 16' door.
12penny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2012, 10:00 AM   #25
Crusty Old Dude
 
Big Stud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Detroit
Posts: 111
Default

Garage door frame slumping.


12 penny has is right indeed. that span should have a solid beam such as a microlam or equivalent. Any engineered beam will do. You can even do it yourself if you are fairly handy. It will require jacking up the trusses and making a temporary wall to hold them up then replace what is there with a beam and new cripple wall. Then lower the trusses and reattach them and redo the siding and drywall that had to be torn off. This is not going to be an easy job. It will take much hard work and sweat to do, and you will need help in lifting the beam into place. A contractor could have it done in a day or so. Will likely take you a few weekends to accomplish from demolition to finish. How much is your time worth and what would happen if you got hurt doing this job? Those are two major questions that you need to answer before attempting this. If you feel confident you can do this, any Home Depot or lumberyard can order you a beam for the span you give them. Just make sure you put the crown up on the beam. It will usually say "this side up" on the top of the beam,

__________________
All the best to you and yours, Tom
Big Stud is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Expanding Garage INTO house (goodbye Den) texaopian Building & Construction 16 11-07-2011 10:32 PM
Garage Insulation yamster Insulation 0 07-01-2011 01:30 PM
Do I have a Fire Rating Issues with Attached Garage Perry401 Building & Construction 4 04-25-2011 11:58 PM
Garage Wiring issues jimmyfloyd Electrical 20 06-08-2009 02:57 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.