Furnance Question. - Building & Construction - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-20-2009, 01:12 PM   #16
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Furnance question.


You for sure need the intake and exhaust vents installed in your furnace. They'll use PVC pipe much like plumbing drainage. One sucks air in, the other blows out (the CO) .

If anything it's better to have a slightly positive air pressure, then negative.

Advertisement

Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 03:21 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 56
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Furnance question.


All I know is this. The more negative pressure you create anywhere in your house the more strain and stress you will create for your furnace motor to run. This can lead to motor burn out eventually and/or back draft causing
CO and/or CO2 to fill your basement.

There were times when I used to close and open one of my basement window routinely to see how my furnace acted and one time I totally forgot for a whole day. My family and I started to feel a lots of headache and dizzness. Then, I remembered and thought maybe it's because of the fume from the furnace filling my basement. I right away opened the doors and windows for fresh year. Within 15 minutes of doing that we felt real good and no headache. From then on I left one of my basement window open slightly. Since then we never felt anything like that.

Before buying the house, I walked through it with the homeowner and at some point I noticed she had a portable CO monitor plugged in the living room, halfway and the bedrooms. I asked her about it and she told me that it was for "accidental" safty and there was absolutely nothing wrong with the house she insisted. Now, I know why she didn't tell me the whole story. Not only that, at the time of closing on the house inspector noticed her furnace was broken. Home inspector ended up requesting the homeowner to get technican in to check out it closely. According to the technican, the heating element in the furnace was totally beyond repair. At the end, the homeowner replaced the old furnace with a new one.

Just goes to show that the whole house was poorly insulated and the furnace must have been beaten to death, because the house couldn't keep the heat. As a result, she completely shut every windows and doors down. Thus, creating negative pressure in the basement. This negative pressure tried to pull outside air from every part of the house even through the window's cracks and gaps, but probably not much leading to CO or CO2 backdraft requiring CO monitors.

I still can't believe she stayed in our house for 18 years with all these problems. I am really having hard time accepting that. She wasn't young either but 70 years old, when I bought the house from her. Scuba if you or your family feel slight headache, I suggest you let in some fresh air from outside. If everyone feels headache, its not normal. I am not joking here either.
__________________
Life is tough, but it is even more tougher when a person is stupid.
diy4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 03:28 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Furnance question.


There simply isn't any way that air isn't getting into your house
Your being paranoid
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 05:00 PM   #19
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,987
Rewards Points: 2,040
Default

Furnance question.


When the furnace uses the oxygen from the air, dangerous by-products are left: http://books.google.com/books?id=891...supply&f=false

These are bare minimum codes, remember: Combustion Air
�� The minimum duct cross section dimension is 3”. (M1703.2.1 for oil and G2407.6 for gas)
�� No dampers in combustion air ducts. (M1701.3)
�� Sources of combustion air > 10’ from return air. (M1602)
�� Joist and/or stud space ducting ok only if a maximum of one fire stop is removed. (G2407.11)
�� Openings screened (except in attic) with 1/4” mesh. (M1703.5)
�� Opening sleeved to 6” above ceiling joists and insulation. (M1703.3 & G2407.11)
�� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building when the building is of unusually tight construction.
(M1701.1.1) (Typically homes built after 1986)
1. Minimum of 100 sq.in. per opening of combustion air is required.
2. One opening in upper 12” and one opening in lower 12” of room.
�� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building, when the building is of ordinary construction (homes
built prior to 1986) and the area of the room is less than 50 cubic feet per 1000 Btu/h of aggregate input
rating of appliances. (M1702.1) See also Construction Tip Sheet 7, Water Heaters.
1. Minimum of 100 sq.in. per opening of combustion air is required.
2. One opening in upper 12” and one opening in lower 12” of room. (UMC 702.1, see exception)
3. Where vertical ducts are used each opening requires 1square inch per 4,000 Btu/h of total input
rating of all appliances in the space. (M1703.2.1)
4. Where horizontal ducts are used each opening requires 1 square inch per 2,000 Btu/h or total
input rating of all appliances in the space. (M1703.2.1)
5. When the one opening method is used. 12” from top of enclosure 1:3000 Btu/h or total input
rating al all appliances in the space. (G2407.6)
�� Only the lower of the two combustion air openings can be connected to an underfloor area. (M 1703.4)
�� Foundation vents supplying underfloor area minimum 2x required combustion air openings. (M1703.4)
�� Crawlspace must meet minimum International Residential Code clearance of 18” from soils to bottom of
joists. (R319)
�� When combustion air is obtained from the attic the attic must be sufficiently vented. (M1703.3)
�� Combustion air openings of correct size. (M1701.5) From: http://www.mybuildingpermit.com/Insp...0checklist.pdf


Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 06:17 PM   #20
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,825
Rewards Points: 2,138
Default

Furnance question.


That is certainly a long list of minimums that must be met to meet the bare minimum requirements. - It seems beyond the realm of the real world considering the quality of existing construction in the U.S. It is fortunate in a way, that the typical U.S. construction is leaky frame construction that will always provide some infiltration for combustion in one way or another.

Dick

Last edited by concretemasonry; 11-20-2009 at 06:37 PM. Reason: spelling
concretemasonry is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 06:21 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somerset, England
Posts: 680
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Furnance question.


Old houses like mine leak like a sieve, but new houses have to undertake an air test to make sure they are reasonably air tight.
stuart45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2009, 07:41 PM   #22
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sandy Hook, CT
Posts: 3,590
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Furnance question.


Quote:
�� Opening sleeved to 6” above ceiling joists and insulation. (M1703.3 & G2407.11)
�� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building when the building is of unusually tight construction.
(M1701.1.1) (Typically homes built after 1986)
1. Minimum of 100 sq.in. per opening of combustion air is required.
2. One opening in upper 12” and one opening in lower 12” of room.
�� Combustion air obtained from outside of the building, when the building is of ordinary construction (homes
Seems this is exactly what I was addressed with the two duct venting that I install. Beauty of the system is no mechanicals so nothing to fail. Air only flows when the furnace needs it.
Bob Mariani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2009, 08:20 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 56
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Furnance question.


Staurt5 and Bob,

My house was built in 1921. How old is yours Staurt5? Just curious.

You know you guys.. Maintaining code is one thing, but when it comes to creature comfort, it is totally something else. If you are not comfortable in your own house regardless of how crappy it is outside, then maintaining code means nothing. As long as you are a very responsible person and have the general knowledge and commonsense, then you really don't have anything to worry about as for as codes go.

Government will come up with as many codes, rules and laws as they want and see fit to make money, but ultimately it will be in your hand to make sure you don't do anything stupid and burn your house down.

I am not an electrician, but I know I have enough background to install circuit breakers and run a wire for my electric dryer.
__________________
Life is tough, but it is even more tougher when a person is stupid.
diy4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 06:55 AM   #24
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sandy Hook, CT
Posts: 3,590
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Furnance question.


Code is a guideline to provide the bare minimum standards. As professionals we build far beyond code requirements. You are suggesting to build below these standards? That is just STUPID. Codes are written to protect the public not to collect money. The codes for electrical work are written by the fire protection agency. The new codes are developed by studies of what is killing people and starting fires. Based on you signature and your statement about code compliance I can see you have a very tough life.
Bob Mariani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:34 AM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 719
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Furnance question.


I totally understand what you are saying regarding fresh air.
Example: Old time fire places had air vents through the walls to supply air to the fire box that way the burning fireplace used the outside air without drawing all the heated air from the house into the fire and up the chimney.

Your heater can work the same way use outside air to feed the fire and not draw already heated air through the heater and out the flue.

Same principal as today's high EFF heater's.

Can't wait to hear from other's I am plugging my ears as I type.
SULTINI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:37 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somerset, England
Posts: 680
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Furnance question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by diy4life View Post
Staurt5 and Bob,
My house was built in 1921. How old is yours Staurt5? Just curious.
My cottage is about 350 years old, give or take a year. Quite a new one for his area. Owning an old house is a hobby, as the list of jobs is endless, especially with my wife writing out the list.
stuart45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:54 AM   #27
Member
 
ccarlisle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,889
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Furnance question.


Diy4, you should have quit days ago; re-read the adage that says you should use your ears twice as much as you talk. And change your monicker; you're starting out on a DIY path that's already wrong.

You won't last.
__________________
“The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960...Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately 1 in 3 Americans,”
ccarlisle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 08:18 AM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 56
Rewards Points: 75
Smile

Furnance question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Diy4, you should have quit days ago; re-read the adage that says you should use your ears twice as much as you talk. And change your monicker; you're starting out on a DIY path that's already wrong.

You won't last.
Carsile must have taken personally what I said previously.

I am so sorry if I hurt your feeling my friend.

As for as codes, I don't mean built houses below standards. Everyone should take all the necessary steps to prevent any accident and protect your property. That doesn't mean open all your doors and windows to keep fresh air circulating through the house and freeze your ass. My house is above and beyond any codes you can think off.

I am not STUPID

More to come
__________________
Life is tough, but it is even more tougher when a person is stupid.

Last edited by diy4life; 11-24-2009 at 08:32 AM.
diy4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 01:39 PM   #29
young diy bloke
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: south east uk
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Furnance question.


i know im probably going over old ground with this but with the gas boilers i work with they use a 600mmx600mm louvred panel for air flow and the plant room stays reasonably warm.

the louvres help to stop direct wind blowing in and also arent open enough to allow the suction effect of a down wind,

this is uk law so not sure about u.s laws.

peace

syborg
syborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2009, 06:39 PM   #30
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Furnance question.


hi

i have been reading all the above comments ragarding a air intake, i also have a wood furnace in the basement, and i was told i 6 inch air intake would be good, now i beleive that it need to be brought into the basement and brought down the wall to the floor, i have also been told that one of these will work great http://www.energyfederation.org/cons...ath/30_744_546

what do you think

Advertisement

paul1969f is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
heat loss through hollow cinder blocks diy4life Building & Construction 11 11-19-2009 11:37 AM
Furnance won't work...question about Lennox G43UF mandirenee HVAC 4 10-09-2009 09:21 PM
Cleaning Furnance / Duct Question jcapone HVAC 6 08-18-2009 12:02 PM
Furnance question satz HVAC 8 02-05-2009 08:44 AM
One furnace question and one thermostat question lh0628 HVAC 4 10-11-2007 11:17 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts