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Old 04-05-2008, 06:17 AM   #1
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French Drain Question


I've been reading about french drains, their construction and how they work. I understand the holes in the perforated pipe are to face down. My question is, if those holes face down, how does any water entering the pipe flow through the pipe (to daylight or a pit) without just flowing out of the holes....?? Are the holes on an angle and off to the side so once the water enters the pipe there is no chance of the water exiting until it reaches its exit point (daylight)... I suppose I should go and look at a perforated PVC pipe. Thanks for the help.

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Old 04-05-2008, 08:56 AM   #2
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Ayuh,.....

It doesn't really matter about the Holes,...
Once the water is In the pipe, it'll flow with the path of Least resistence, which is down the pipe.....

If you put the holes on Top,...
The water has to get higher to get into the pipe,+ dirt is more apt to fill the holes....

Btw,..... The Black flexable pipe that I've seen has holes All around it....

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Old 04-06-2008, 05:47 AM   #3
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location of the holes in pvc/ads makes no difference,,, water'll run downhill - seek its own level - rush to fill a void no matter which direction holes face,,,

eg, if you have wtr in 1 section of pipe, it won't make any difference where it is long's its under the floor,,, we used ads flex pipe as it was less expensive but, occasionally, we had to use hard pvc.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:25 AM   #4
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The holes definitely go down (at 4 and 8 o'clock). Ideally, you should us a fabric "sock" to filter out the dirt unless you go to the trouble of using the right aggregate around and under the drain - clean rock is usually not good.

The flexible stuff is worthless because it lets in too much silt and the water flows slower.

If the holes are up, they allow more dirt and silt into the pipe and you will not collect as much water or lower the ground water level unless you want to dig down deeper. If you dig deeper, your run to day light will also be longer.
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Old 04-07-2008, 05:38 AM   #5
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always thought 'french drains' were invented at fountainbleu, fr, where paving stones were laid at slight angles to form surface trenching directing surface water under the hall of mirrors down to the reflective gardens,,, we called today's projects ' perimeter sub-floor water management systems',,, don't agree on flex vs pvc - clean stone sized 3/4"- - filter fabric on outside of trench - sock'd pipe clogs sooner.

just my experience in nj-ct-pa-ny.
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Old 04-07-2008, 08:53 AM   #6
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There are a lot of different definition of a "frech drain" depending on the time and location.

The Fontainbleau example sounds like a well know example.

Often french drain are used without and pipe. Prime examples of uses described as french drains are on golf course where trenches are dug and filled with sand/rock and topped off several inches of top soil. This collects surface drainage relatively quickly and directs it away without any barriers or ugly installations. It also drais out the soil, so the turf is healthier since large areas of mixed soils and slopes are watered frequently.

Many farms rely on drains that are just 12" or 16" lengths of tile set with open joints to dewater areas with heavy soils.

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