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Old 06-04-2012, 05:03 AM   #1
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Hello Experts,

Newbie here, I have a question for you kind gentlemen, I want to install a 72x80 double door into my existing garage wall (See attached picture). I was planning on 4x4 posts on each side a 4x8 header above. My question is about the cross bracing we will be cutting through. Can I just cut through it or do I have to modify the construction to compensate for losing it?

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Old 06-04-2012, 07:22 AM   #2
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Need to go back and add where you live in your profile for better ansewers.
I could not get the picture to come up.

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Old 06-04-2012, 11:30 AM   #3
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Picture uploaded again, I am in Maui, Hawaii.
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Old 06-04-2012, 12:04 PM   #4
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


That bracing might be needed--what is the sheeting under the siding?

If it is plywood you may be okay--if not then adding diagonal 2x4 bracing could be the answer--

I suggest you use conventional framing--2x4s and the appropriate header rather than 4x4 posts--
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:16 PM   #5
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


If its got a diagonal brace, it is possible that it may be a 'shear wall', which is intended to provide lateral support to an adjoining wall. If this is the case, you may need to sheath the remainder of the wall in plywood; the local Code may also stipulate the maximum opening size and position of the opening if it is, in fact, a shear wall.
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:17 PM   #6
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


The sheeting is 5/8" T1-11. There is no siding on the house.
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Old 06-04-2012, 06:27 PM   #7
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


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Originally Posted by tony.g View Post
If its got a diagonal brace, it is possible that it may be a 'shear wall', which is intended to provide lateral support to an adjoining wall. If this is the case, you may need to sheath the remainder of the wall in plywood; the local Code may also stipulate the maximum opening size and position of the opening if it is, in fact, a shear wall.
that is what I was thinking also. just sheath the interior wall around the door opening and to the edges. that would laterally support the wall
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Old 06-04-2012, 06:35 PM   #8
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Here is a full diagram of the interior of the exposed garage wall. and where we would like to install a door. As you can see the wall is 20 feet in length and is open on the bottom under the beam about 5" above the floor. The cross brace is my concern as well as anything else that I don't know about.
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Old 06-04-2012, 06:39 PM   #9
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


That bracing is what is known as a "let-in" brace, I am sure it was required for shear strength when the building was constructed.
You can take care of this using prescriptive methods outlined in the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC).
If you intend to get permits for this project you will need to make plans for the Building Department and show how you intend to replace the shear in the wall if you cut out the existing bracing.

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Old 06-04-2012, 06:47 PM   #10
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Don't forget that all of your framing lumber needs to be treated.
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Old 06-04-2012, 07:10 PM   #11
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


I would recommend contacting your local building department and have them give you direction as they are familiar with your building code requirements. As Andy and others stated let-in bracing is used to provide shear resistance (braced wall panels) in wood framed construction, and is a building code requirement (for shear resistance). There are different ways of accomplishing this. Depending on your distance from the ocean you may have a requirement for stronger walls than the IRC code specifies.

The building official should be able to explain your local requirements better than I.

Good luck!
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Old 06-04-2012, 07:18 PM   #12
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Your red lined drawing shows the door going in below the 4 X 6, it needs to be above it not below it.
This doorway is going to need a header.
Never use a 4 X 4 to frame in a doorway. It's going to twist and curl, use 2, 2 X 4's instead.
There is 0 reason to use pressure treated wood.

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-...h-opening.aspx

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Old 06-04-2012, 07:23 PM   #13
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


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Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
There is 0 reason to use pressure treated wood.
PT is required for "all" structural members (including sheathing) in HI.

There's probably more Termites on the islands than there is in the Continental US.

They don't show you that in the brochure.
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Old 06-04-2012, 11:05 PM   #14
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


Is it possible the T1-11 is not original? I would expect 5/8" T1-11 to provide enough shear strength. My theory is that the let-in bracing was at one point the only thing making that wall a shear wall. Then the siding was replaced with T1-11, which made the let-in bracing obsolete and relatively pointless (much like, say, a casing nail where there's already a common nail). Of course this is just a guess. What concerns me is the proximity of the proposed opening to the end of the wall. The ends are critical areas in shear walls. You really should consult with a professional in your area for a thorough evaluation and recommendation.
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Old 06-04-2012, 11:10 PM   #15
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Framing Question adding door to stud wall with cross bracing


What is the purpose behind the 4x6 beams so close to the floor?

Andy.

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