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Old 09-28-2012, 08:17 PM   #31
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Not in the places where I have moved interior partitions that do not go to ceiling anyway.

Putting the nails in on an X or V is good.

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Old 09-29-2012, 10:35 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
Ok.....I guess my OCD tendencies would not let me do that....I would spend an hour cutting a nice clean slot in the drywall....but then again, I'm not doing this stuff for a living.
if a drywall slot is cut it will require 2 or 3 more studs in the wall the drywall was cut in to hold the drywall either side of the new wall and to hold the new wall itself, just like a T in a normal framed wall. Even over top of drywall as long as the new wall is nailed/screwed good at bottom and top what difference is that to a normal new framed wall that is only nailed/screwed to the bottom plate and top plate only and for the stud against the drywall- glue and screws can be added along the studs length so it is really stronger than a normal framed stud in a wall,imo.

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Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk View Post
in situations i have to frame to the drywall i use construction adhesive and either the framing gun or long screws and cross nail so the fastener acts like a kris krossing staple to lock the wood in place til the glue drys

in commercial application as soon as one wall goes up it has to get drywall before the next wall for fire code. there cant be any penetrations for fire or smoke to pass through.. if wires or pipe run through they have to be sealed around with fire caulking

construction adhesive is a great idea! With commercial drywall the studs are metal and those type studs grab really well to drywall when using the angled screw method, with much force you cannot hardly pull a stud from the wall once its screwed to it.
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Old 09-29-2012, 12:48 PM   #33
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you can still pull the stud away from the drywall if its just attached with screws as drywall has no holding power.. its the adhesive that does all the work
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Old 09-29-2012, 11:10 PM   #34
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Figure on getting some movement/jarring of the jambs from the door closing against the stop trim (and hinge side if door is solid-core). If the new door location is close to a wall stud on each side, the adhesive may work. Don't glue the bottom of stud to flooring preventing expansion/contraction of the wood floor. Angle a long screw (TimberLoc or ?) in to the bottom plate (and top plate) of the wall to secure the stud (with filler added last) on each side. If the door location lands 12" from a 2' on-center wall stud layout, let us know, we can help. There is a risk of fastener pops in the wall drywall if too far from solid backing.

Is there an egress (escape) window in the new "bedroom"?

Gary
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Old 10-04-2012, 09:58 AM   #35
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So what is the consensus?

1. Cut the drywall or dont cut it?

2. does the same methodology apply to the top plate which will span the 39"? The ceiling joist run parallel to the "new wall" so chances are it may not hit a joist. Will nailing it to the left and right top plates along with construction adhesive and screws to the drywall be enough?
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:26 AM   #36
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I don't cut it, right kind of adhesive to existing drywall, Nail so you hit top and bottom plates on old wall, And angle nails in middle area, NO bottom plate on new wall, toenail to floor (adhesive too if removing hardwood). NO header.

Put full height studs on each side, build box and put above door opening, fill in under on each side (1" lumber). You have 34" rough opening for your door.
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Old 10-04-2012, 12:19 PM   #37
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So what is the consensus?

1. Cut the drywall or dont cut it?

2. does the same methodology apply to the top plate which will span the 39"? The ceiling joist run parallel to the "new wall" so chances are it may not hit a joist. Will nailing it to the left and right top plates along with construction adhesive and screws to the drywall be enough?

As Mae-ling mentions, use construction glue behind the top wall plate and side king studs against drywall along with the other attachment methods and do not cut the drywall. The door jamb side that the door closes against ( door strike jamb) will sustain the greatest force whenever the door way is used so make sure that side has adequate support, toe nailing through the jack stud, through the flooring and into the sub floor is recommended for that side of the door opening.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:42 PM   #38
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If far from existing wall studs; you need to stabilize the middle where the lockset (or passage) is located. I would; remove drywall in a 3"x3' slot behind the lock side jamb, about halfway-floor/ceiling. Remove small access holes in drywall 3"x3"- one at top/bottom of wall behind same jamb. Measure inside cavity for stud height, cut new stud (1/4" shorter), then cut in 1/2 for two pieces (at middle). Add a screw (drywall) to the top/bottom center of one piece, and another at top/bottom center of other piece. Slip a string through top hole to tie onto screw at stud end of top piece which aligns with drywall hole, slip stud in cavity (with strings on all screws), pull up into position, screw it to existing drywall behind new door stud, then secure it to existing wall top plate. When done, add 1/2" plywood strip to fill drywall holes, caulk joints (just to air seal), no tape- no need with solid wood backing there. The buried stud will give extra strength to resist movement of the new door jamb stud without patching existing wall drywall or showing signs of bloopers. Need to get both stud pieces in cavity before installing one or the other... I'd do the top one first. You could just cut a slot in the wall- top to bottom though the first idea took more typing... LOL. Either way, you would sandwich the ply between two studs, one is full length, use long screws throughout, especially at the lockset area.

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Old 10-04-2012, 04:23 PM   #39
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GBR - you concerned with the corner cracking because of shifting of the stud on the strike side when the door gets slammed a few times? Adhesive and full stud which is properly secured top and bottom should handle that.

Although yours will work and is not a bad idea
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Old 10-04-2012, 11:45 PM   #40
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Either way is fine, "I would" is the way I would do it. If you get fastener pops, should have gone the stronger way, LOL. I raised 4 boys... I heard girls can slam a door pretty well rather than just hang on it... Solid-core (with 3 hinges) might need more strength, full 3" casing would help more than a skinny 2-1/4" one. I'm more concerned with egress from the new "bedroom"... unless I missed that.

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Old 10-05-2012, 08:27 AM   #41
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Either way is fine, "I would" is the way I would do it. If you get fastener pops, should have gone the stronger way, LOL. I raised 4 boys... I heard girls can slam a door pretty well rather than just hang on it... Solid-core (with 3 hinges) might need more strength, full 3" casing would help more than a skinny 2-1/4" one. I'm more concerned with egress from the new "bedroom"... unless I missed that.

Gary

adding the larger casing for the trim is a great suggestion. This has not been brought up in the thread but there will need to be a wall stud slot cut into the current baseboard also so that will actually give some bottom of the wall support against slamming doors and what not.
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:05 AM   #42
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I wanted to thank everyone who contributed to this thread. The project is complete and it came out great!


Cheers,
Jamie
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:38 AM   #43
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Outstanding job.....looks really good.

So...how did you eventually end up attaching the studs?
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Old 11-26-2012, 12:40 PM   #44
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Wow! great job and it even has a transom congratulations
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:16 AM   #45
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I nailed the 2x4 to the top and bottom plates as normal and applied construction adhesive in conjunction to nailing in a v and x pattern. At first i didnt think it was going to work due to the wall having a bow in it and not having applied enough adhesive. I ran another beed of glue along each edge forcing more glue in, once it cured it was very solid.

Next i nailed the 5/4 as the jack stud as mentioned in the thread however i had to remove it in place of a 1x, the 5/4 didn't allow enough clearance to plumb the door. This was a minor setback and mostly due to the walls not being true top to bottom. It did require a lot of shims in order to properly hang the door and that made it a bit tricky for a DIYer.

I built the jam for the transom with the window stops and moulding and was able to easily install that.

Next i began to cut and install the crown moulding. This was my first attempt and like everything by the time i was half way through i was an expert. Hardest part, was measuring, positioning and nailing the 14' pieces solo. My wife being 9 mons pregnant just couldnt climb the ladder! LOL

It was a fun project and I really am happy with the results. Thank to all for the great advice i received, I wouldnt have been able to do it without your help.


Cheers,
Jamie

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