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Old 09-27-2012, 06:46 PM   #16
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framing question


for the rough opening it wouldnt hurt to allow an extra 1/2" in the width. reason being if hte framings isnt perfectly plumb. having an opening only 2" wider than the door itself allows very little space for shimming which can create issues. i dont know how many times ive had to modify the framing of r.o's when the framers made them too tight and out of plumb.

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Old 09-27-2012, 08:10 PM   #17
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This makes perfect sense. Thanks for the advice.
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:13 PM   #18
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you could put in a 2x for the king and then use a 5/4 board for the jack, that would leave the 5" perfectly.
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:15 PM   #19
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Hand Drive, I'm not a carpenter, what is a 5/4 board?
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:20 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Jamie.M View Post
Hand Drive, I'm not a carpenter, what is a 5/4 board?

it is usually yellow pine and used for outside corner trim boards on a house and measures 1" thick. A 5/4 x4 is exactly 1" thick by 3 1/2" wide and can be used in conjunction with a 2x4. Also, for that amount of wall length and the minimal contact with the floor you could probably screw the king stud to the wall( screwing into wall plates will result in the best grab) and then screw through the jack stud with a long screw in through the king stud and into the wall and not have to attach to the floor at all...

Last edited by hand drive; 09-27-2012 at 09:07 PM.
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:37 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by hand drive View Post
it is usually yellow pine and used for outside corner trim boards on a house and measures 1" thick. A 5/4 x4 is exactly 1" thick by 3 1/2" wide and can be used in conjunction with a 2x4. Also, for that amount of wall length and the minimal contact with the floor you could probably screw the king stud to the wall( screwing into wall plates will result in the best grab) and then screw through the jack stud with a long screw in through the king stud and into the wall and not have to attach to the floor at all...
So you think I can avoid putting a bottom plate considering each side of the door would only be 2.5"? That is a great idea, I'm just wondering would it be enough grabbing the plate as you mention.
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Old 09-28-2012, 08:21 AM   #22
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So you think I can avoid putting a bottom plate considering each side of the door would only be 2.5"? That is a great idea, I'm just wondering would it be enough grabbing the plate as you mention.

There is no need for a bottom plate in that situation, just run the king and jack stud down on top of the hardwood, a dab of construction adhesive under the studs to the hardwood will help hold it in place. For both king studs, if you place 3" or 3 1/2" screws about 1" up off of the hardwoods through the king stud at a slight downward angle you should hit the bottom wall plate located in the walls you are filling in between, and the same holds true at the top of the wall just angle your screw upward some to catch the top wall plates in the walls. Also, add a few screws along the king stud that are angled (sideways)and connect the stud to the drywall, imagine just screwing through the stud straight into the wall but angle the screw some so that it grabs better from a diagonal point of view.


For the order of building the wall... put your wall top plate up first, then your two king studs along the outer perimeter of the wall. Nail/screw the king really good to your new wall top plate at the top and also screw through the wall that the kings sit against and screw into the wall's plates both bottom and top. Now, figure out the height of your door opening and add the 2x4 header across the span between the two king studs. You can position this header in the same orientation as the top wall plate is placed,and toe nail/screw the header to the king studs.
Next, measure for both jack studs( 5/4 board) and add the jack studs underneath the header from the header down to the floor. Now add cripple studs along the space above the header and wall plate, basically just fill in the wall above the header at 12" or 16" centers for the stud spacing and cut tight measurements that fit between the top of the header to the underside of the top wall plate. Be sure and add a cripple at both outer edges of the wall against the king stud to carry the load path of the jack stud up the entirety of the wall from floor to ceiling.

edit, you may need 105" studs for the king studs because of the lack of bottom wall plate but everything else should be standard 8' studs.

Last edited by hand drive; 09-28-2012 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 09-28-2012, 09:52 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by hand drive View Post
There is no need for a bottom plate in that situation, just run the king and jack stud down on top of the hardwood, a dab of construction adhesive under the studs to the hardwood will help hold it in place. For both king studs, if you place 3" or 3 1/2" screws about 1" up off of the hardwoods through the king stud at a slight downward angle you should hit the bottom wall plate located in the walls you are filling in between, and the same holds true at the top of the wall just angle your screw upward some to catch the top wall plates in the walls. Also, add a few screws along the king stud that are angled (sideways)and connect the stud to the drywall, imagine just screwing through the stud straight into the wall but angle the screw some so that it grabs better from a diagonal point of view.


For the order of building the wall... put your wall top plate up first, then your two king studs along the outer perimeter of the wall. Nail/screw the king really good to your new wall top plate at the top and also screw through the wall that the kings sit against and screw into the wall's plates both bottom and top. Now, figure out the height of your door opening and add the 2x4 header across the span between the two king studs. You can position this header in the same orientation as the top wall plate is placed,and toe nail/screw the header to the king studs.
Next, measure for both jack studs( 5/4 board) and add the jack studs underneath the header from the header down to the floor. Now add cripple studs along the space above the header and wall plate, basically just fill in the wall above the header at 12" or 16" centers for the stud spacing and cut tight measurements that fit between the top of the header to the underside of the top wall plate. Be sure and add a cripple at both outer edges of the wall against the king stud to carry the load path of the jack stud up the entirety of the wall from floor to ceiling.

edit, you may need 105" studs for the king studs because of the lack of bottom wall plate but everything else should be standard 8' studs.
Thanks for the great advice, tips and detailed instructions. My wife will now think i am a genius!

Jamie
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Old 09-28-2012, 10:28 AM   #24
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it is usually yellow pine and used for outside corner trim boards on a house and measures 1" thick. A 5/4 x4 is exactly 1" thick by 3 1/2" wide and can be used in conjunction with a 2x4.
Man I wish we had that around here.
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Old 09-28-2012, 10:47 AM   #25
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I have got to do a better job of reading the posts....

Ok....so that I understand this...

39" width hallway....including drywall....32" door....but you really need 34" (1/2" of wiggle room)....thus leaving 5".

Well....you really should cut out the drywall for the king studs....you don't want to be nailing the stud through drywall....so, assuming you have 5/8" drywall...you get 1 1/4" additional space...for a grand total of 6 1/4"....enough space for king and jack studs...

Looks now like you need to do some shiming.....

Side note....while you may not need the header....you still want at least 2 studs on each side....otherwise, you don't have enough meat to nail your trim to...
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Old 09-28-2012, 10:52 AM   #26
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No need to rip out the drywall, just nail your stud top and bottom and use adhesive to attach to drywall.
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:07 AM   #27
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No need to rip out the drywall, just nail your stud top and bottom and use adhesive to attach to drywall.
Is it common practice to nail studs on top of drywall?
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:15 AM   #28
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Would not say common, but it is done, especially in renovation work and sometimes in commercial work where walls are moved around.

Don't just nail, use drywall adhesive. Have heard of guys who use anchors like the ones used for holding pictures or whatever.
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:19 AM   #29
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Ok.....I guess my OCD tendencies would not let me do that....I would spend an hour cutting a nice clean slot in the drywall....but then again, I'm not doing this stuff for a living.
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Old 09-28-2012, 07:07 PM   #30
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in situations i have to frame to the drywall i use construction adhesive and either the framing gun or long screws and cross nail so the fastener acts like a kris krossing staple to lock the wood in place til the glue drys

in commercial application as soon as one wall goes up it has to get drywall before the next wall for fire code. there cant be any penetrations for fire or smoke to pass through.. if wires or pipe run through they have to be sealed around with fire caulking

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