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Old 04-05-2012, 11:52 AM   #1
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Framing over cinder block


I've decided I want to put up framing over the cinderblock walls in my garage and then drywall. In the picture below, is it really that simple? What steps should I take to ensure I'm doing it correctly?

The job looks straight-forward but in my garage, there is already a finished ceiling and I'm not so sure what I need to do in order to attach a 2x4 up there since I now have no exposed joists. Do I need to take the ceiling off first or what?

According to the image, the frame does not get attached to the cinder block, this is true?

Thanks!


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Old 04-05-2012, 12:00 PM   #2
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Framing over cinder block


Myself, I'd use more foam, furring strips anchored to the wall, and skip the fiberglass. PT bottom plate, as shown, and tape the seams of the rigid foam.

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Old 04-05-2012, 12:07 PM   #3
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Framing over cinder block


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Myself, I'd use more foam, furring strips anchored to the wall, and skip the fiberglass. PT bottom plate, as shown, and tape the seams of the rigid foam.
Thanks for the reply. What does 'PT' mean? You mention furring strips. Are you saying you'd attach strips directly to the block? I was trying to not do that so I don't risk weakening the block wall and same me time as well. What advantage do furring strips have?

I should mention I plan to hang things from the wall once I'm complete ( that's the whole reason to do this ). Will the strips give me more strength to hold stuff?
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:18 PM   #4
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Framing over cinder block


PT= pressure treated. I can not imagine a few anchoring screws reducing the strength of the blocks. You'll only have a few per furring strip. I'm not a concrete guy, so maybe one of the folks more experienced w/ that will reply. Whether or not they would hold your shelving depends on what is on the shelving, of course. I am sure fastener web sites have data on what size, etc, for what weight.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:18 PM   #5
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Framing over cinder block


I wouldn't use furring strips, especially if you are going to hang things from the wall. Also, if you use them, your walls will be too shallow for electrical boxes if you want to add outlets or switches.

"PT" means pressure treated lumber. Wood in direct contact with masonry must be pressure treated so it doesn't rot.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:28 PM   #6
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Framing over cinder block


Ah.. 'pressure treated'... got it Good to know about the treated lumber.

From that image, it looks like NONE of the studs are attached to the block. That makes me wonder how it will really hold anything.

Yeah, I plan to put electrical boxes in the new walls too. The items I plan to hang range from my bicycles to a wheel barrow, ladder, etc. I have no way to hang them now without having to punch holes in the block with TapCons and short pieces of wood.

What would be the best approach to tackle the finished ceiling? What other things must I do to make sure this is done properly?
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:44 PM   #7
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Framing over cinder block


Quote:
Originally Posted by SingleGuy
Ah.. 'pressure treated'... got it Good to know about the treated lumber.

From that image, it looks like NONE of the studs are attached to the block. That makes me wonder how it will really hold anything.

Yeah, I plan to put electrical boxes in the new walls too. The items I plan to hang range from my bicycles to a wheel barrow, ladder, etc. I have no way to hang them now without having to punch holes in the block with TapCons and short pieces of wood.

What would be the best approach to tackle the finished ceiling? What other things must I do to make sure this is done properly?
The wood should never come into contact with the block. Use pressure treated lumber for the bottom plate and regular lumber for top plate and studs.build your frame on the floor then put it in place about 1"off the wall.secure bottom plate to the floor with ramset and top plate to the joists. No need to make the whole frame out of PT lumber.if you put the wood againest the wall it will pull the moisture out of the block.
No need to remove the ceiling,once the frame is rocked it will look finished.
Look at the pic,see the bottom plate looks green?
PT lumber.

Last edited by sublime2; 04-05-2012 at 12:48 PM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:39 PM   #8
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Framing over cinder block


That ramset looks pretty nice. Is there another option to attach the bottom plate though? That looks a little expensive and this is only a two-wall project

Is the blue foam in the picture for a vapor barrier or insulation ( or both? )? Is that a required component if the other side of the wall has no dirt on it? Speaking of which, should I coat the cinder blocks with some sort of sealant prior to putting the studs up?
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:44 PM   #9
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Something else I'd like to confirm here... I've read a little about how far the drywall should be up and away from the floor. If I'm not mistaken, 1/2" is the minimum gap between dryall/floor right? Looks like that in the picture too. I suppose a base board will cover that gap up?
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Old 04-05-2012, 03:50 PM   #10
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Framing over cinder block


Quote:
Originally Posted by SingleGuy View Post
That ramset looks pretty nice. Is there another option to attach the bottom plate though? That looks a little expensive and this is only a two-wall project

Is the blue foam in the picture for a vapor barrier or insulation ( or both? )? Is that a required component if the other side of the wall has no dirt on it? Speaking of which, should I coat the cinder blocks with some sort of sealant prior to putting the studs up?
you can use a hammer drill and fasten the bottom plate with Tap-Cons. they are special masonry screws that will secure the wall to the floor.

the rigid foam will act as both a vapour barrier and insulation, that is why you want to tape the seams.. you can buy it in different R- values, so depending on the batt insulation you are using and the overall desired R- value you are trying to achieve, will determine the thickness of the rigid foam. you may consider using some construction adhesive to glue the rigid foam to the block wall and then build your stud wall and press to the foam.

i would also use a foam gasket under your PT bottom plate.

rod

you do not need to coat the block at all
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Old 04-05-2012, 06:56 PM   #11
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Thanks Rod. I'm going to price the materials tomorrow.
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:18 PM   #12
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Framing over cinder block


Quote:
Originally Posted by SingleGuy
Something else I'd like to confirm here... I've read a little about how far the drywall should be up and away from the floor. If I'm not mistaken, 1/2" is the minimum gap between dryall/floor right? Looks like that in the picture too. I suppose a base board will cover that gap up?
That's correct.
When you go,look at the manual ramset. You use a hammer to actuate it.
With the tool,#4 loads and 3" nails it will cost you around $30. Quicker then drilling holes not to mention you will need a hammer drill and the tapcon bits are not really practical for concrete plus you will need to drill holes at least 3 1/2" deep for the tapcon.

Last edited by sublime2; 04-05-2012 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:04 PM   #13
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Framing over cinder block


Technically speaking, it's unlikely you have actual "cinder" blocks, BTW. You probably have concrete blocks. They looks the same but have very different density. Cinder blocks are made of ash are thus considerably lighter and less likely to be used to, say, hold up a house. This has no bearing on your question, but I couldn't help throw in that bit of info.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:34 PM   #14
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Framing over cinder block


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That's correct.
When you go,look at the manual ramset. You use a hammer to actuate it.
With the tool,#4 loads and 3" nails it will cost you around $30. Quicker then drilling holes not to mention you will need a hammer drill and the tapcon bits are not really practical for concrete plus you will need to drill holes at least 3 1/2" deep for the tapcon.
I'll certainly check that out. That would be cheaper than all the TapCons I'd need too
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:36 PM   #15
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Technically speaking, it's unlikely you have actual "cinder" blocks, BTW. You probably have concrete blocks. They looks the same but have very different density. Cinder blocks are made of ash are thus considerably lighter and less likely to be used to, say, hold up a house. This has no bearing on your question, but I couldn't help throw in that bit of info.
I didn't know that. My grandpa called them that so growing up that's what I did thanks

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