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-   -   framing code/no code alabama (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/framing-code-no-code-alabama-161471/)

marko205 10-28-2012 09:27 PM

framing code/no code alabama
 
Hi, I am new here. But was needing some help with a couple building questions. I am building a 32deep and 30wide garage, with a 3'0x6'8" man door and (2) 9'wide x 8'tall garage doors, all on the front of garage.
NO PLUMBING
And it will have a cement block knee wall 20" tall around the garage for the walls to stand on. Questions are.......

1. studs on 16"c, what are the measurements, min/max heigth, for the horizontal pieces between the studs? I think it has to do with a (fire break)?
2. Heigth for electrical outlets from the floor (has 20" cement block knee wall) then wooden wall.
3.Are there any restrictions on electrical outlets on the wall, above the work table.

I am a jack of all trades, but master of none!

joecaption 10-28-2012 10:56 PM

How high are you going to build the garage? (from the floor to the celiling height?) That needs to be know to ansewer you question about fire blocking.

I'm not an electrition and will get reamed out for suggesting anthing but I've built many a garage and dozens of sheds.
One mistake I see time and time again is to "under wire" them. Meaning most people cheap out when it come to supplying enough power thinking all there going to need is a few lights and a couple outlets. When it come time to really use the building they find out there just no way to add all the thing they want to do due to the fact there just is not enough power and not enough circuts avalible.
Doing it right the first time will save you money not cost you.
You have to make up a wish list of all the possible things you will be using the garage for in the future so you can come up with the amount of power your going to need.
All the garages I've built for my own use I installed a 60 amp. panel Had 20 amp. GFI protected outlets every 6 to 8 ft. along the walls and over the work bench area I used double outlets every 4'. Ran outlets for garage door openers even if I did not have the money at the time to buy them. Outlets in the ceiling so I could just plug in 4' lights. 2, outside outlets.
Light fixtures near the side door and over the overhead door.
I run all my outlets with 12-2 wire and a 20 amp. breaker.
I run an outlet with #10-3 wire to an outlet near a window this way I can have a 110 volt or if I chose I can have a 220 voilt A/C unit and not have to go back and change the wiring, just the outlet and the breaker.
(outlets can be any heigth from the floor)
Once done I've never wished I had of ran another outlet some place, never had a breaker trip, never had a brown out when running something.
In my area your only are required to have at least one GFI protected outlet in a whole garage. Many time I've had customers think that's all there going to need so they think you can just run one #12-2 from the house to run all the light and outlets.
So make a list, air compressors, welders, microwaves. table saws, dust collectors, HVAC ECT. have to be prewired and planed for even if you do not have them yet.

GBrackins 10-28-2012 11:06 PM

and don't forget beer fridge ....

joecaption 10-28-2012 11:13 PM

Darn I forgot two of the most important things, The fridge and the wall outlet for my prized man cave lit beer sign.

GBrackins 10-28-2012 11:27 PM

thus the reason for making a list and checking it twice .... http://www.arboristsite.com/images/smilies/cheers.gif

marko205 10-29-2012 01:07 AM

joe from the pad to the ceiling will be 10' 8", but the first 20" is a cement block knee wall. actual studded part is 9'.
2-3 220v on each wall, 3-4 110v on each wall, 3-4 110v above work table, with 5-6 110v on ceiling, and 1 110v gfci on every outside corner.

md2lgyk 10-29-2012 07:43 AM

I am not a pro, though I did build my house myself. Unless there's something peculiar to garages in the code, I don't see why you'd need any fireblocking at all. My house has none, and passed all inspections.

hand drive 10-29-2012 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1040145)
I am not a pro, though I did build my house myself. Unless there's something peculiar to garages in the code, I don't see why you'd need any fireblocking at all. My house has none, and passed all inspections.


fireblocking depends on how it was framed and it might not need any at all, it will need fire foam where the electrical wire goes down through the top wall plates and any holes made in the plates. if drywall or wall covering is never added to the walls and ceiling of the garage then fireblocking really is not needed though if fireblocking is needed it is better to put it in before the wire is run.

AndyGump 10-29-2012 09:52 AM

Quote:

R302.11 Fireblocking. In combustible construction, fireblocking shall be provided to cut off all concealed draft openings (both vertical and horizontal) and to form an effective fire barrier between stories, and between a top story and the roof space.

Fireblocking shall be provided in wood-frame construction in the following locations:

1. In concealed spaces of stud walls and partitions, including furred spaces and parallel rows of studs or staggered studs, as follows: 1.1. Vertically at the ceiling and floor levels. 1.2. Horizontally at intervals not exceeding 10 feet (3048 mm). 2. At all interconnections between concealed vertical and horizontal spaces such as occur at soffits, drop ceilings and cove ceilings. 3. In concealed spaces between stair stringers at the top and bottom of the run. Enclosed spaces under stairs shall comply with Section R302.7. 4. At openings around vents, pipes, ducts, cables and wires at ceiling and floor level, with an approved material to resist the free passage of flame and products of combustion. The material filling this annular space shall not be required to meet the ASTM E 136 requirements. 5. For the fireblocking of chimneys and fireplaces, see Section R1003.19. 6. Fireblocking of cornices of a two-family dwelling is required at the line of dwelling unit separation.
From IRC 2009

This might help but I doubt it.

Andy.

md2lgyk 10-29-2012 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1040171)
it will need fire foam where the electrical wire goes down through the top wall plates and any holes made in the plates.

Agreed. I did do use firestop foam. Just no horizontal 2x4s between the studs.


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