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Old 03-26-2007, 12:44 PM   #1
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framing a basement wall


I'm looking to frame/insulate/drywall my laundry room ...Some questions..

1. What is the best way to fasten the sill plate to the ground...When I did the other part of the basement I drilled pilot holes and used concrete nails...I found this to a bit of a pain so I'm looking for other ideas....

2. I don't want to fasten the top plate right into the joists above but rather leave a bit of space because of some wiring etc......How much space would be alright and what is the best way to fasten the top plate to the joists?

3. Is it better to put up the top and bottom plates and then put in the studs or should I just build the wall and move it into place?.....

Thanks..

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Old 03-26-2007, 01:21 PM   #2
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framing a basement wall


1. I've used adhesive and a powder actuated nailer.

2. Not sure I follow this question. Are wires already running below the joists at the spot where you want to put the wall? Is the wall parallel or perpendicular to the joists? What kind of ceiling are you installing?

3. It depends. How level are the floor and joists above? Take a few measurements. If they're consistent and you have the room, build on the floor and lift into place. You can also do it the other way. Just make sure you mark both for the stud placement.

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Old 03-26-2007, 02:00 PM   #3
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framing a basement wall


thanks for the reply....

The longer wall will run perpendicular to the joists and the shorter wall will run parallel...There are some wires that are connected beneath the joists which I guess is wrong but it would be way too much work fixing this up...I thought if I could just make the frame an inch or two shorter than flush with the joists it would make things a little easier.....I"m not planning to do anything with the ceiling at this point....
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Old 03-26-2007, 04:50 PM   #4
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framing a basement wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by The RyeGuy View Post
1. What is the best way to fasten the sill plate to the ground...When I did the other part of the basement I drilled pilot holes and used concrete nails...I found this to a bit of a pain so I'm looking for other ideas....
As mentioned, powder actuated fastener. Trigger kind runs about $80.00?, hammer striker kind runs about $30.00. Cheaper to buy than to rent them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The RyeGuy View Post
2. I don't want to fasten the top plate right into the joists above but rather leave a bit of space because of some wiring etc......How much space would be alright and what is the best way to fasten the top plate to the joists?
Is the wiring already in place and in the way?

If it is, you could build the wall behind or in front of the wiring....

Quote:
Originally Posted by The RyeGuy View Post
3. Is it better to put up the top and bottom plates and then put in the studs or should I just build the wall and move it into place?.....
Thanks..
What you are initially referring to is called 'stick framing'. This is ususally the best way to frame a basement that is older. The reason being, because the joists are not perfectly level and even, and the floors are very rarely level and even as well.
If you have a newer home, then yes, it is possible to build the walls and stand them up. Take measurements and see if the floor to height distance is continuous along the distance of the run that you want the wall to be. You can use shims where there are gaps.
If you have a newer home, you could try both methods and see which one works best for you.
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Old 09-12-2008, 09:58 PM   #5
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framing a basement wall


this basement is build in 1906 is hihger onone end than the other so we are drying to levelit
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Old 09-12-2008, 10:02 PM   #6
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framing a basement wall


sorry computer is new to me
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Old 09-12-2008, 10:05 PM   #7
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framing a basement wall


wegutted the frist three floor in the house and we can not level the support beam that runs down the middle
of the basement everytime we level the top the bottom is not level
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Old 09-12-2008, 10:40 PM   #8
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framing a basement wall


1. Tap cons are screws you drill and screw into the concrete. The screws come with drill bit for piloting.
2. By the sounds of it you want to suspend the top plate from the joist. Well using a full threaded screw temp the top plate with some sort of shim or spacer. Then without piloting the top plate put the screw through the top plate into the joist. You need to pat attention to the length of the screw that its long enough. Just remember to double the screw (two in each joist)
3. Normally you could build the wall and stand it up but basement floors aren't always level enough but for a few and piping and wiring in the ceiling get in the way. Saying that it is better to stick build.

Hope it helps

Quote:
Originally Posted by The RyeGuy View Post
I'm looking to frame/insulate/drywall my laundry room ...Some questions..

1. What is the best way to fasten the sill plate to the ground...When I did the other part of the basement I drilled pilot holes and used concrete nails...I found this to a bit of a pain so I'm looking for other ideas....

2. I don't want to fasten the top plate right into the joists above but rather leave a bit of space because of some wiring etc......How much space would be alright and what is the best way to fasten the top plate to the joists?

3. Is it better to put up the top and bottom plates and then put in the studs or should I just build the wall and move it into place?.....

Thanks..

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