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Old 03-16-2011, 07:18 PM   #1
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Flying Buttress Question?


Does someone know what the attached support to this beam does?

see photo or link below

https://picasaweb.google.com/1063815...29700796098562
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Old 03-16-2011, 08:00 PM   #2
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Flying Buttress Question?


My guess is that it was going to be used to create an angled ceiling plane; for what purpose is pure speculation. Perhaps the angle was to be continued around the remaining perimeter with plywood to create a tray ceiling, or maybe it was simply going to create a chase down that one corner for something(pipes, ac duct, etc). Since welding to the steel beam is the easiest way to attach any type of framing(particularly angled), I think they just took advantage of having the welder on site when the beam was installed.
I cannot possibly imagine any structural element to it. Be interesting to see what others read into it.

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Old 03-16-2011, 09:09 PM   #3
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Flying Buttress Question?


Is there a load bearing wall above that buttress? Just a guess. Maybe the wall being off the beam, they were trying to transfer the load to the beam. Might be an afterthought to please an inspector. Just a guess.
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Old 03-17-2011, 10:51 AM   #4
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Flying Buttress Question?


Possibly the fellow was hanging something heavy from the long strut (looks like steel angle from your photo, but I can't be sure).
I agree with troubleseeker that it can't possibly be structural.

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Old 03-17-2011, 11:03 AM   #5
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Flying Buttress Question?


Maybe whoever put that in expected the house to roll onto its side and need a ladder they could use to climb out.

The structural significance of it is that the process of welding it to your real beam resulted in the steel grain structure being altered, typically a weld results in harder stronger steel in the heat affected zone while there is a transition zone where the metal is weaker than it was to begin with, and this transition zone is the most likely place for fracture to initiate.
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Old 03-17-2011, 02:26 PM   #6
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I seriously doubt that it is structural. Any serious load (I'm talking a real structural load, not just drywall) applied to the that metal frame would cause a moment force that the steel probably couldn't handle. The frame would bend and it would be useless.

Also, if that welded frame was transferring a load to the I-beam, it would transfer a portion of that load in a lateral direction, which is a no-no for I-Beams. (the beam would probably handle it but it just isn't what it is designed for)

I think someone was trying to make a frame for a fancy angled ceiling.
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Old 03-17-2011, 02:28 PM   #7
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Looking at it again, maybe they were trying to make a wire tray (similar to what one would see in an industrial building). I doubt any of us could know for sure though.
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Old 03-17-2011, 02:43 PM   #8
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Flying Buttress Question?


My first GUESS would be that the steel beam might have been rolling over do to other improper intstatation factors and the piece was added to either prevent further damage, to straighten it or to hold it in place after it was straightened.

Guess #2. The span of the floor joist was too long by one foot and this was the fix permitted by the building inspector to reduce the span.
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Old 03-17-2011, 03:36 PM   #9
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Guess #2. The span of the floor joist was too long by one foot and this was the fix permitted by the building inspector to reduce the span.
There have been a few people suggest this, but it doesn't look like it is doing much supporting, it looks to me to just be flat steel, which doesn't have much strength as it can deflect.

It also doesn't make much sense to me that they did that for a chase as it would be much easier and cheaper to attach some 2x material to the beam and then use wood to build a chase.

This one has me scratching my head for sure, be sure and let us know if you find out.
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Old 03-17-2011, 05:21 PM   #10
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[quote=it would be much easier and cheaper to attach some 2x material to the beam and then use wood to build a chase.[/quote]

How is the quality of the welding ? Maybe the guy was a welder, and for him, it was easier to find scrap steel and fab it up.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:11 PM   #11
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It also doesn't make much sense to me that they did that for a chase as it would be much easier and cheaper to attach some 2x material to the beam and then use wood to build a chase.
This one has me scratching my head for sure, be sure and let us know if you find out.
I have worked both wood and steel construction, and believe me, it is much easier to weld some sort of framework to that beam than to try to bolt, screw, or fasten with powder actuated fasteners.

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