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Old 02-14-2008, 06:03 PM   #1
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Floor Joist question


Good Evening all,

While inspecting behind a false wall in my basement, I happened to look up to where my bathroom shower was located and saw something that didn't look right. I was looking to make sure that there was no water leaking from the pan onto the subflooring and no problem...no leaks anywhere. Finally, it came to me what was wrong. The idiot who installed the shower drain managed to line it up exactly with one of the floor joist. No problem, he cut the floor joist to accommodate the trap.

Now, I don't mean he notched it, I mean he CUT ALL THE WAY THROUGH the joist. So, in essence what I have is a floor joist held up by the flooring nails above it and a three inch gap where my shower drain is located.

This is a raised ranch, and it's on one side of the house. There's a main ridge beam running down the center of the house and this side would be a 12 or 14 ft joist. The cut is about 4 ft from the outside wall.

Any suggestions on how to fix this? Should I lag bolt a 6 or 8 ft 2x12 to the side? As I said, it's behind a false wall so I have about 2 to 3 ft of space that runs along between the outside wall and the inner wall. I thought if I scabbed a piece on there and perhaps put a floor jack to help support it? I don't know. My main concern is how to fix it properly. In other words, if you were going to buy my house and saw this, what type of repair would make YOU happy and feel good about the person who repaired it.

I'm not having any sagging problems that I'm aware of. As a matter of fact, I've owned the house for 17 years now and just found this a week or so ago. I normally don't wander behind that wall unless I really need to.

Thanks

Tony

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Old 02-15-2008, 05:53 AM   #2
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Floor Joist question


Can you post a photo?

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Old 02-16-2008, 04:50 AM   #3
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Floor Joist question


If you were to scab/sister in a piece of wood you need to run it the total length of your joist from the outside wall to the bearing beam.Thats what I would want to see if it were up to me........
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Old 02-16-2008, 07:04 AM   #4
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Floor Joist question


I'll try to post a pic tonight.

The only way I could sister in a new joist is if I take down a wall so I can get at it. I'm thinking of doing some work anyway that would entail removing the wall, so that would be a good time to go ahead and fix that at the same time.

So if I put a new joist in there, should I also attach it to the existing joist with lag bolts or something?
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:54 AM   #5
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Floor Joist question


If you are going to remove the wall anyway for other work, take the oportunity to fix it correctly with full length pieces. I would not sister a piece directly on the side of the cut joist though, as this will most likely prevent any future access to the drain should there be a problem in the future. The proper way is to double the joists on either side of the cut one. Then I would widen the cut area of the existing joist to about 18 " centered on the drain location. Then install a header using joist hangers to support the "dangling" ends of the cut joist, and the headers. This will be completely legal for any future inspection purposes, and create an open square area around the drain for service.
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Old 02-17-2008, 10:24 AM   #6
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Floor Joist question


OK, finally here are some pictures.



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I was wrong on the only thing holding it up were some floor nails. As you can see, there is a 2x4 from the false interior wall holding the long end of the joist.

As you look at the pictures, my back is to the rear exterior wall and my right elbow is touching the West outside wall, so I'm backed up into a corner looking straight up. Directly in front of me is the intersection of the false walls, the back and the west end. The West false wall has a cantilever in to the room so it's shaped at the top as so:
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  |   Inside of room
This is providing additional clearance for the drain pipe from the shower. Now, why they didn't re-route it is beyond me, they had plenty of room from the pic, but nevertheless, that's what they did.
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:21 AM   #7
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Floor Joist question


Quote:
Originally Posted by FatAugie View Post
As you can see, there is a 2x4 from the false interior wall holding the long end of the joist.
Wondering if there's a footer under that 2x4 ??
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:46 PM   #8
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Floor Joist question


I'm sure there isn't. The downstairs was an afterthought 6 years after they built the place, so it would have to be incredible luck if there was.
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Old 02-17-2008, 07:02 PM   #9
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Floor Joist question


It looks like there is a wall taking some(most of) the load very close by? I would maybe head-out that section so that the "broken" joist is supported by the adjacent joist on either side. Cut the flailing joist back to provide room to get the cross members in.

You can try to sister on another the joist to the one that is out of view then run framing perpendicular.



Last edited by LakeTahoeDan; 02-17-2008 at 07:05 PM.
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