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Old 03-21-2011, 12:36 PM   #16
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Floor bounce and vibration


Rossfingal--thanks. No cuts to double plate. No cuts to the joists.

I am guessing first order of business is to get vertical 2x4 running from bearing wall to the floor in the areas where the blocking was removed.
Second order would be to perhaps double up the studs in the wall, correct?

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Old 03-21-2011, 01:51 PM   #17
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Floor bounce and vibration


Are there any plumbing, electrical or other things running through
the bearing wall?
rossfingal
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:06 PM   #18
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I don't believe there is anything that runs through the bearing wall.
There are a few things that are attached to it.
We AT&T Uverse for phone, tv, internet and they have some NetGear equipment attached to the bearing wall. This is close to the exterior wall and the main electrical panel. There is an electrical outlet attached to the stud--just an open box anchored with a nail.
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:32 PM   #19
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If there's nothing in the wall, that you have to worry about going around
or moving - then, just add 2x4's right next to the existing 2x4's.
Nail them together with 16cc "Sinkers" (not "Common Nails") 5 or 6 nails
distributed down the length of the 2x4.
(I hate to "beat a horse to death" but)
we would also glue them.
If you want to move into the "over-kill" mode (We Love Over-Kill!) -
after you double-up the studs - install 2x4's, going from the bottom of the joists to the floor - tight - with the wide face (3 1/2" side) against the studs.
Nail these studs to the double 2x4's - 3 or 4, 16cc nails hitting both of the
double 2x4's (3 or 4 nails hitting each stud - not on/near the ends). (Glue?!?)
rossfingal
(Then, do the blocking)
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:19 PM   #20
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Rossfingal,
Thanks, I can follow the first part on the double studding.

The overkill part I get a little lost. If I understand, 2x4 that would run from top of the double studded plate tight to the floor. Could I simply put the wide part of 2x4 flush to the joist and nail to the top and bottom chords of the joist? Or, is it important that I nail it to the top plate?
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Old 03-21-2011, 05:00 PM   #21
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Put the 2x4 with the "wide side" (3 1/2" side) against the double 2x4,s.
With the wide-side (3 1/2" side) against the bearing wall - run it from the bottom "chord" of the joist to the concrete floor (this is for load-bearing).
(The only reason (I can see) to run this 2x4 from the bottom of the
sub-floor to the concrete floor - is to prevent the joists from - deflecting,
twisting).
However, your sub-floor is fastened to the top of the joist; and, the bottom of the joist is fastened to the bearing wall - therefore - limited "deflection".
Regards!
rossfingal
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Old 03-22-2011, 11:54 AM   #22
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Floor bounce and vibration


Before you start anything you need to make sure of this key support issue.

The 1/2 story should be supported by a wall or beam.

If wall there should be a wall or "I" beam in the basement directly under that wall.

If beam there should be support as I described earlier with the 2x4s. These 2x4's should be directly over the same construction in the basement, to that the support for the top floor goes all the way to the footings in the basement.

An excellent example of this is in the show "Holmes Inspection".

See the episodes "Load of Trouble" it has 2 parts. Thier 2nd story was not supported correctly. They show how to fix it, and the fix goes all the way to the basement for correct structual support.

All supports should be directly over the supports below. Making a direct line to the concrete in the basement.
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Old 03-22-2011, 04:59 PM   #23
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Thanks to all who have posted here, I greatly appreciate that complete strangers have taken time to share their knowlege and expertise with me.

Pjordan, I think you are right, first things first, I guess I need to make sure it is structurally sound. Without that I have nothing.

Here is how I think it is supported. On the first floor there is a big LVL beam that runs across an open area. I was told this is load bearing.
In the basement below this is the 2x4 bearing wall. The bearing wall runs the entire length of the basement. But I think only a portion of it is bearing from the second floor. They took out some blocking, that the floor guy said was load bearing.

The interesting thing to me is that the 1st floor right above the bearing wall is open space. There are no direct connections from the 2nd floor. The LVL beam is between the first and 2nd floor. Nonetheless, if I understand correctly that space under the LVL beam in the basement ceiling is load bearing even though there is no direct connection? Is this correct? (an engineering thing that I don't understand).

I still don't fully understand how the 2x4 should go in there to support. But I will see if I can find the Holmes episode on the web, I sure that would be extremely informative.

I have a lot of duct work that will be problematic.
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Old 03-22-2011, 05:05 PM   #24
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Attached picture.
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Old 03-22-2011, 05:11 PM   #25
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I'll post a few more pictures later this evening.
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Old 03-22-2011, 06:38 PM   #26
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Floor bounce and vibration


meature

The stud wall in the basement is a load bearing wall.
The floor joists for the first floor, all bear directly on it.
If you double the 2x4 studs in that wall, you have a wall that
is essentially, a 4x4 wall, 16" on center.
This would be considered "adequate" (to say the least).
Consider this: a two story house - the center, bearing wall in the first floor will most likely be a 2x4 stud wall 16" on center - this will be carrying approx. one half of the load from the second floor (and, some of the roof).
My suggestion concerning, adding 2x4's - was in the basement wall -
not in the first floor.
You have a LVL beam in the first floor - then: you probably don't need to add any studs in the basement load bearing wall.
Maybe check out where the ends of the LVL beam would be resting on.
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Old 03-22-2011, 07:42 PM   #27
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Rossfingal,

I think doubling up the studs in the bearing wall is a good idea and cost effective.

Here is my concern, the joists (i beams) may be bearing some of the load from the second floor. I don't think these i beams are intended to bear any load. That thin strip between the two chords may not be very strong. Although it is 16 oc so I guess one joist has a great load.

Does the LVL between the first and second floor transfer load all the way down to the basement even though there is no visible beam, column directly under the LVL. I think the edges of the LVL sit on a studed interior wall.

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Old 03-23-2011, 06:25 AM   #28
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meature

Yes, I agree that doubling up the studs in the basement wall is a good idea!
The LVL beam in the first floor is carrying the load.
Try to measure/determine where the load from the ends of the LVL are
hitting the floor and joists above the bearing wall in the basement.
That's where you should make sure there are plenty of studs, in the basement bearing wall - for support.

Some more pictures would be good!

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Old 03-23-2011, 11:35 PM   #29
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Floor bounce and vibration


Here is a picture with the double stacked bearing wall. No blocking between the floor and the bearing wall.

The other pics show where the blocking has been removed from a bay to allow duct work. The beam between the first and 2nd floor sits on a wall and then I believe the load bearing points of that wall were suppose to run through the blocking to the bearing wall in the basement,

It looks like I can some 2x in some of the bays where the blocking was.
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:41 PM   #30
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More pics

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