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-   -   First timer framing question??? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/first-timer-framing-question-84829/)

gabel8 10-25-2010 08:32 AM

First timer framing question???
 
I am going to be starting on my basement and it is the first time that I will ever do framing.
My question is when I am framing a long wall say about 22 feet, what do you do when you get towards the end of the wall and your studs are not 16 inch on center at the end?
Also, when you are doing a long wall, would you just lay down the bottom plates along the whole wall first and then the top plates and then add the studs down the entire wall?

wnabcptrNH 10-25-2010 09:23 AM

To answer your questions, layout the wall from one end and when you get to the end the last space will not be 16" on center. Just make sure you remember this when you are drywalling.

In a basement you should always install your baseplate, level the line up with a 6' and 4' level and then install your top plate. Then custom cut all your studs to fit in their prospective spots.

Also, the best way to do a basement is 3/4" rigid foam on the floor with plywood tapconed down to the concrete and 2" rigid over the walls (use PL premium to stick it to the wall. Be sure to tap all your joints. This will help with moisture in the basement.

gabel8 10-25-2010 09:40 AM

Thanks for the help, I was going to put the foam on my walls but I was going to use the 1 1/2" vs. the 2", would this be sufficient? Also, I am concerned about putting it on my floor because I would like to have maximum amount of clearance for the ceiling and adding foam and plywood would seem to take away from my space. Any thoughts on that?

wnabcptrNH 10-25-2010 09:52 AM

1.5" should be fine. I just always use 2".

As for the height issue I understand where you are coming from. The foam with taped joints helps with moisture. I just recently did a house where there are low ceilings but I still did the foam and plywood because its worth it. We didnt install strapping on the ceiling to make up for this. I know this isnt right but it was a sacrifice we made. The basement has a drywall ceiling on it prior and no strapping with no cracks.

Good luck.

HiccaBurp 10-25-2010 12:54 PM

Use metal studs?
 
The way I do my basements it install a PT plate to the ground and then use metal framing for the walls. It's much easier to install and doesn't expand/contract as much as wood and is also less prone to moisture damage as it doesn't absorb like wood.

Just my .02 cents

slickgt1 10-25-2010 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HiccaBurp (Post 522725)
The way I do my basements it install a PT plate to the ground and then use metal framing for the walls. It's much easier to install and doesn't expand/contract as much as wood and is also less prone to moisture damage as it doesn't absorb like wood.

Just my .02 cents

Yea but PT is not really the right thing to do if it is a living space.

HiccaBurp 10-25-2010 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickgt1 (Post 522733)
Yea but PT is not really the right thing to do if it is a living space.

Why? I have not heard this.. sorry.

md2lgyk 10-25-2010 01:17 PM

I've never heard this either.

wnabcptrNH 10-25-2010 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HiccaBurp (Post 522736)
Why? I have not heard this.. sorry.


Never heard of that either.

If your basement has any moisture, steel studs will rust and fail over time. They may be galvi but when subjected to moisture they will fail.

slickgt1 10-26-2010 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wnabcptrNH (Post 522759)
Never heard of that either.

If your basement has any moisture, steel studs will rust and fail over time. They may be galvi but when subjected to moisture they will fail.

As far as I know, here in NYC we can use PT for structural framing, but not for interior living space framing. Something to do with the chemicals in it. Maybe you can use Kiln dried after treatment lumber, but deff not regular PT.

And I have personally used a galvanized metal track, roof felt wrapped 2x4 in it for the bottom plate. Regular wood for studs and top plate. I had to open up that wall 6 years later due to a pipe leak, everything looked great as far as rust and rot. I don't really do too many basements so not sure how this will hold up down the line. So far I am happy with it.

wnabcptrNH 10-26-2010 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickgt1 (Post 523197)
As far as I know, here in NYC we can use PT for structural framing, but not for interior living space framing. Something to do with the chemicals in it. Maybe you can use Kiln dried after treatment lumber, but deff not regular PT.

And I have personally used a galvanized metal track, roof felt wrapped 2x4 in it for the bottom plate. Regular wood for studs and top plate. I had to open up that wall 6 years later due to a pipe leak, everything looked great as far as rust and rot. I don't really do too many basements so not sure how this will hold up down the line. So far I am happy with it.

Thats great but as I said if your basement has moisture that is.

slickgt1 10-27-2010 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wnabcptrNH (Post 523276)
Thats great but as I said if your basement has moisture that is.

I agree, I didn't have to deal with much moisture.

Gary in WA 10-27-2010 01:54 PM

Gabel8, The 1-1/2" may or may not work..... what is your location? The 2" is to keep the inside face warm from the room so the moisture doesn't condense there, as it would if in a cold climate- hence colder concrete walls = colder foam.

A sill sealer (poly) will act as a thermal/capillary break if any water under the slab. Foam board would stop any moisture also, but would need to be 8" thick to obtain the vapor barrier (impermeable) classification.

If under IRC (building code) in your area, p.t. wood on concrete (or other resistant wood from a list) is required.

Gary

slickgt1 10-28-2010 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 523920)
Gabel8, The 1-1/2" may or may not work..... what is your location? The 2" is to keep the inside face warm from the room so the moisture doesn't condense there, as it would if in a cold climate- hence colder concrete walls = colder foam.

A sill sealer (poly) will act as a thermal/capillary break if any water under the slab. Foam board would stop any moisture also, but would need to be 8" thick to obtain the vapor barrier (impermeable) classification.

If under IRC (building code) in your area, p.t. wood on concrete (or other resistant wood from a list) is required.

Gary

I absolutely love it when you chime in.


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