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Old 10-03-2009, 12:11 PM   #1
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Fireblocking ?


Know this is an older thread, but it has good pictures, and info in it... so it seemed most appropriate to put it here.

I am in the process of getting my basement ready for the first round of inspections, which for me in my jurisdiction is rough electrical, rough plumbing, framing/fireblocking inspections. This thread has some good examples in it, and I have been reviewing both the docs my city has available as well as stuff on the web. I agree with someone who said earlier in this thread.. the point in fireblocking is not to get past the inspection but to provide fire slowing if a fire starts. SO....

The way fireblocking was described to me by the city folks/their documentation is blocking must exist in the following locations:

Every 10' vertically... (my basement is 8' tall so this does not apply)
Every 10' horizontally..
Where-ever fire could move from a vertical structure to a horizontal structure..(ie top plates of walls/soffits/etc...)

I checked with my code office, and packed fiberglass is fine for the space between the top plate of exterior walls and the foundation.. Below is a picture of how I packed the insulation into this space. I framed very close to my basement foundation walls you can see by the picture, though it never touches.. (this picture was taken in one of the tight locations, mostly it is a bit farther off the concerte wall than this) Though my framing is never more than an inch away.. So I also need to fireblock every 10' horizontally. I will be insulating all the exterior walls, but my plan was to either pack insulation between the stud and the concrete every 10' or use great stuff fire foam... I know both comply with local code, but does anyone have a preference?



Below is a close up where a soffit runs into a pillar.. Additionally this soffit is against a steel support beam. I have fireblocked between the pillar and the soffit, the soffit is needed to conceal pipes, and as it turns out was the easiest place to run electrical as well. Marked FB in the picture. (the pillar as required to conceal a drain pipe (seen in picture).. I also packed insulation in the small cavity between that the steel I beam makes on the same plane. Does this look good? Question 2, do I need to fire caulk all the seams in addition to the lumber? (that may need to be asked of my local inspector)



Ok and my last question concerns these soffits...(also applies to above picture..



the soffit is a horizontal structure, yet it connects to another horizontal structure IE the ceiling with joists in perpendicular directions. Do I need to/should I block the connection between the soffit and the ceiling? Above it was stated this was not needed... I am just reverifying....

Yo can also see in this picture a dead space that I have blocked the ceiling(though it still needs some packing done around the pipe) of in the back right behind the curved wall. If anyone is reading this before framing... BLOCK dead spaces before you frame.. man was that a pain.

PS any other comments on my blocking etc... are welcome as well.

Thanks, Brian


Last edited by BrianAg95; 10-03-2009 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 10-03-2009, 05:22 PM   #2
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Fireblocking ?


Interesting you bring this up, as I've been researching fireblocking myself. I've been toying with the Great Stuff products. The now have a fireblocking foam, which is much more expensive than the regular staff. I think it's just a marketing ploy. The other types are actually Class A rated. And I've taken a few pieces of each, burning them with various things from lighters to a torch. They burn the exact same way in the exact same time.

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Old 10-03-2009, 06:33 PM   #3
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Fireblocking ?


KC did a wealth of good information on this site: How to fireblock framing

I would suggest you read this on foam in basements: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...gs?full_view=1

I would fill all the knock out plugs in all joists as well, just to give my family another few minutes while it burns into the next bay.
If a fire starts or gets in the chase under the floor I joists, it would have access to the whole upstairs or at least all the floor bays connected to the chase. As brought out in KC's article.
Be safe, Gary
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Old 10-04-2009, 09:49 PM   #4
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Fireblocking ?


Thanks for the links I had already read that forum posting, and actually, I had replied in that thread with this original post. I do not know why it was moved.... perhaps I broke some forum rule I was unaware of.

I have also read the building science page on the foam, thanks for the link though, but I am in line with my region for moisture control in my wall assembly, based on conversations with the building department and local basement contractors. And the whole moisture control thing is another topic entirely.
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Old 10-04-2009, 09:59 PM   #5
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Fireblocking ?


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Originally Posted by BrianAg95 View Post
Thanks for the links I had already read that forum posting, and actually, I had replied in that thread with this original post. I do not know why it was moved.... perhaps I broke some forum rule I was unaware of.
No specific rule
The "How To Guides" are generally for explanations of how to do something
We try to keep the discussions/questions in the other areas
I just noticed 3 more question threads in that forum & moved those too
It's usually faster to get replies to a question in the other forums
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Old 10-05-2009, 06:55 AM   #6
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Fireblocking ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by willcmjr View Post
Interesting you bring this up, as I've been researching fireblocking myself. I've been toying with the Great Stuff products. The now have a fireblocking foam, which is much more expensive than the regular staff. I think it's just a marketing ploy. The other types are actually Class A rated. And I've taken a few pieces of each, burning them with various things from lighters to a torch. They burn the exact same way in the exact same time.
The two types of foam may perform the same in your tailgate test, but there is one BIG difference. The fireblock foam was tested and received a UL rating as a fire blocking material. The rest only have the class "A" rating. Class "A" is a flame spread and smoke production rating. Paints, wallcoverings and a host of other building products can recieve a class "A", even though they have nothing to do with firestopping.
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Old 10-05-2009, 10:42 PM   #7
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Fireblocking ?


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Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
The two types of foam may perform the same in your tailgate test, but there is one BIG difference. The fireblock foam was tested and received a UL rating as a fire blocking material. The rest only have the class "A" rating. Class "A" is a flame spread and smoke production rating. Paints, wallcoverings and a host of other building products can recieve a class "A", even though they have nothing to do with firestopping.
Absolutely 100% correct. Foam is not prescriptively permitted by code, so a foam fireblocking product must be listed as such. Marketing? Very possibly, but it doesn't matter where the rubber hits the road.

Brian, from what I can see of your fireblocking it appears to be an excellent job. No fireblocking is necessary between the horizontal soffit and the floor framing. Vertical to horizontal isolation is required, and the soffit and the ceiling are both horizontal spaces. Personally I prefer insulation over fireblocking foam between the top plate and the concrete, but either would be totally acceptable.
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Old 10-06-2009, 08:56 PM   #8
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Fireblocking ?


Thanks for the feedback.

I have a few spots that I'm not happy with my solution (a dead space that is basically a plumbing/venting space, that due to obstructions and the framing I did(IE not planning ahead for fireblock) meant I ended up stuffing it with insulation). But for the most part other than fire foaming up holes I am mostly complete with this stage.

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