DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   fire protection (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/fire-protection-6124/)

JustJoe 01-26-2007 05:48 PM

fire protection
 
I had a friend that had a house fire and asked me to help him rebuild. I am not a contractor so i will have questions from time to time and appreciate anyones support.

The house had a basement apartment which we totally gutted. We were told that we had to provide 1 hour fire protection between the basement apartment and the apartment above it.

My question would be if i'm not mistaken is that a one hour fire protection would consist of two sheats of 5/8 drywall. Is this correct or am i forgetting something?

Thanks,

JustJoe

Tmb9862 01-26-2007 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustJoe (Post 31347)
My question would be if i'm not mistaken is that a one hour fire protection would consist of two sheats of 5/8 drywall. Is this correct or am i forgetting something?

Thanks,

JustJoe

Wait for a better answer than I can give you but I doubt that's the optimal/most cost effective way to do it. You might be able to use a certain type of insulation in ceiling, or maybie some sort of foam sheets instead of a second drywall layer.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-26-2007 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustJoe (Post 31347)
I had a friend that had a house fire and asked me to help him rebuild. I am not a contractor so i will have questions from time to time and appreciate anyones support.

The house had a basement apartment which we totally gutted. We were told that we had to provide 1 hour fire protection between the basement apartment and the apartment above it.

My question would be if i'm not mistaken is that a one hour fire protection would consist of two sheats of 5/8 drywall. Is this correct or am i forgetting something?

Thanks,

JustJoe

Yes, you are correct. 2 layers of fire rated 5/8" Sheetrock. (seams cannot overlay eachother - stagger any seams)
If you have further questions, your local drywall supplier can help you too.

BTW- You can spend more money on fire-rated acoustic ceiling tiles, and other fire rated materials, but the most cost effective way to achieve fire ratings are with fire rated sheetrock.

yummy mummy 01-26-2007 07:34 PM

atlantic
 
I just love reading your answers to posts.

I have learned so much from you.

the man 01-26-2007 08:29 PM

Fire rated sheetrock
 
Justjoe
When you install the sheetrock you must have air space between the sheets which gives the one hour rating,

don't use fire rated drop in ceiling tile. the tile might be rated for one hour but the metal around isn't rated , also to get a rating it must be smoke proof.

al

JustJoe 01-26-2007 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the man (Post 31364)
Justjoe
When you install the sheetrock you must have air space between the sheets which gives the one hour rating,

don't use fire rated drop in ceiling tile. the tile might be rated for one hour but the metal around isn't rated , also to get a rating it must be smoke proof.

al

How much space do i need between sheets.

Thanks,

JustJoe

concretemasonry 01-26-2007 09:10 PM

fire protection
 
In most fire resistant assemblies for building codes and UL, air spaces are not a part of the system. Usually they rely on the total thicknes of materials when applied in layers with appropriate joint or seam spacings.

the man 01-26-2007 10:58 PM

fire rated
 
Justjoe

If you use the International code check residental code section
SRR 321.1 which refers to ASTME 119.
also check with you Bld Insp. you did get a Building Permit for this work didn't you.

al:wink:

JustJoe 01-27-2007 07:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the man (Post 31377)
Justjoe

If you use the International code check residental code section
SRR 321.1 which refers to ASTME 119.
also check with you Bld Insp. you did get a Building Permit for this work didn't you.

al:wink:

Didn't start work yet, just trying to gather information. Permit will be in window prior to construction.:yes:

AtlanticWBConst. 01-27-2007 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concretemasonry (Post 31371)
In most fire resistant assemblies for building codes and UL, air spaces are not a part of the system. Usually they rely on the total thicknes of materials when applied in layers with appropriate joint or seam spacings.


This is correct. There is not a requirement for any air space between the sheet layers.
If there were such a thing, then we have built about a thousand fire partitions improperly...and all those blue prints that we have used from, the architects and engineers, are wrong too.

JustJoe 01-27-2007 07:45 AM

Thank you:thumbup:


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:59 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved