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Old 06-15-2012, 03:24 PM   #1
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


Hello all,

I'm using a Remington #4 .22 charges in a hilte gun to fasten pressure treated sole plates to the concrete floor in my basement remodel. I found greater success if I got the nails started partway in the lumber (like driven halfway through the wood). However at the front of my room which is just about 12 ft wide, these things are just like breaking little pieces off the concrete. The nail drives all the way in, but the pressure treated 2x4 can just come right off the floor because it seems the concrete just crumbles away when the nail strikes.

So are #4's too strong or too weak? They only go up to #5.

I am using liquid nails extra strength construction adhesive in addition. I've read tap-cons are the new way to go for this kind of application, but I don't have a hammer drill or know someone that does. The ONLY section I have left to do is a 11' 9" stretch that is giving problems. The rest of the room is framed and awaiting wiring, insulation and drywall.

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Old 06-15-2012, 05:01 PM   #2
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


You may just be better off drilling with a hammer drill and using Tapcons.

You don't mention how old the slab is but it takes concrete a 100 years to fully cure. I've gave up quickly many times on trying to shoot into old concrete and grabbed the drill.

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Old 06-15-2012, 05:10 PM   #3
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


House was built in 1979, so 33 years.
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:31 PM   #4
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


Tap Cons have always worked for me.
I use a Bosch Bull Dog hammer drill.
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Old 06-15-2012, 08:14 PM   #5
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


Ok great. So next question...

This basement was just furred out with wood paneling. So we ripped all that out and framed it right so we can insulate it and put up drywall. Part of that process meant removing and destroying the old carpet tack strips along the two outside walls that were furred out.

So we are going to cut the carpet back to fit of course, but my question is what's the best way to fasten the new tack strips to the concrete floor? Theres a glued down membrane but at the edge of that the old tack strips were nailed into the floor. The nails weren't big by any means. Think I can just liquid nails new tack strips down? Or is this another case for tapcons? I don't know how they drove nails in the old strips. Hit really hard or used air tools I guess.
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Old 06-15-2012, 11:11 PM   #6
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


I usually recommend a sill sealer under the p.t. bottom plate for an air/thermal/capillary break from the wet earth; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code
If you know there is poly sheeting under the slab from the install, at least caulk the plate/slab joint to stop air movement from reaching the colder concrete wall to condense and wet your insulation. Unless you have foam board- no worries: http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...lation-systems The slab will still be a "heat sink" to lose your conditioned warmth to the earth, unless built as suggested. The carpet pad may mold from moisture from below if no poly as brought out in the last link.

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Old 06-16-2012, 11:46 AM   #7
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by cypherx View Post
Ok great. So next question...

This basement was just furred out with wood paneling. So we ripped all that out and framed it right so we can insulate it and put up drywall. Part of that process meant removing and destroying the old carpet tack strips along the two outside walls that were furred out.

So we are going to cut the carpet back to fit of course, but my question is what's the best way to fasten the new tack strips to the concrete floor? Theres a glued down membrane but at the edge of that the old tack strips were nailed into the floor. The nails weren't big by any means. Think I can just liquid nails new tack strips down? Or is this another case for tapcons? I don't know how they drove nails in the old strips. Hit really hard or used air tools I guess.

possibly liquid nails for the tack strip. it will provide somewhat of a seal between the damp concrete and the tack strip, I think you can get tack strips that are treated. you might want to also think about priming the tack strips to block out moisture. I have pulled up many tack strips in old basements and after years and years there is not much left to them because of moisture rot.they also make a tack strip with concrete cut nails in them to

Last edited by hand drive; 06-16-2012 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:19 PM   #8
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


remember, wood never goes in direct contact with concete (even PT, which is rot resistant not water resistant). use a gasket in between.
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Old 06-17-2012, 10:37 PM   #9
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


if the powder gun shots are too powerful? try tapping the barrel of the gun on the floor a few times. it will pack the load and lessen the power. try 2 1/2" nails instead of 3"

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Old 06-20-2012, 08:41 AM   #10
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


I may be wrong entirely about this but I'll provide what information I have about the concrete shots. I have also recently completed the framing of my basement and used the same .22 loads. From what I understand, the concrete nails do not need to secure the treated baseplates to the floor in regards to vertical movement. My baseplates would also easily lift off of the floor if I tried. Again, from my understanding, once the nails have been driven into the concrete they will prevent the baseplate and subsequent wall from lateral or side to side movement. Once the studs are built above the baseplate and attached to the joists, the fit of the wall will prevent any vertical movement. Hope this helps!
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Old 06-20-2012, 09:45 AM   #11
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Fastening sole plate to old concrete floor


What we ended up doing since its only 11ft 9in section, we put a sh*tton of extra strength liquid nails on it and then put heavy concrete blocks on it for a week. Then after that time we returned the blocks back to my patio wall outside where they came from and kicked the sole plates and they didn't budge. That plus the weight of the stud wall built on top and us also tying it into the sides and front along the middle allowed it to work.

We rocked on it and nothing moves at all. It feels solid with two guys leaning into it.

The whole thing is framed now and I have it partially insulated, hoping to complete the insulation work this weekend and get it ready for some drywall.

Though in the future if I ever do a bigger project or move into a bigger house with more of these types of things needing to be done, I certainly will invest in a hammer drill.

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