Fastener Sizes Listed In Code Books - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-12-2008, 07:55 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 257
Rewards Points: 258
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


I went to the library and was looking through my local codes. I was wondering about fastener sizes. It says you have to use 3-8d nails for toe nailing. Is this the minimum requirement? Can you use larger nails than specified for toe nailing? Also, it does not specify placement. I wasn't sure if this was an issue or not. I noticed some framers put two nails through the 2x side of a stud and one nail through the other side. This gives you the the required amount of nails.

The code book also didn't mention screws as fasteners. I read on here that screws shouldn't be used in framing. I was wondering about sheathing or siding. It seems like screws would provide more strength.

Advertisement

bluefitness is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2008, 08:27 AM   #2
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefitness View Post
The code book also didn't mention screws as fasteners. I read on here that screws shouldn't be used in framing. I was wondering about sheathing or siding. It seems like screws would provide more strength.
i wondered that about screws and siding too when i first read it on this site. when we moved in here, i vinyl sided the exposed side 'temporarily' using 1" drywall screws. i just left them loose enough to allow movement. here it is 4 years later, and it's still fine. in the spring, i will unscrew and reuse the siding i already have up, just moved around to the back of the house. 100 mph winds did not bother it either!

DM

Advertisement

__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Click here to see some of my original magic tricks and trick boxes!
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2008, 08:50 AM   #3
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Screws are not an option in structural framing applications, period. You can use them, but they don't get you out of meeting the minimum nailing requirements. Screws do not have the shear strength that nails do, 100mph winds or not.

I'm assuming when you're talking about 3-8's you're talking about toenailing studs to plates. Three 8's is one option and two 16's is the other option. Configuring the 8's with two on one side and one on the other is the way to go, although the code doesn't require a certain configuration.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2008, 09:21 AM   #4
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Screws are not an option in structural framing applications, period. You can use them, but they don't get you out of meeting the minimum nailing requirements. Screws do not have the shear strength that nails do, 100mph winds or not.
who said anything about structual framing? i said cheap vinyl siding.... and if the wind WAS going to blow it off, the plastic almost certainly would break off and blow away before a nail OR a screw would pull out.... screws in sheathing is just dumb.

DM
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Click here to see some of my original magic tricks and trick boxes!
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2008, 08:46 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 257
Rewards Points: 258
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Screws are not an option in structural framing applications, period. You can use them, but they don't get you out of meeting the minimum nailing requirements. Screws do not have the shear strength that nails do, 100mph winds or not.

I'm assuming when you're talking about 3-8's you're talking about toenailing studs to plates. Three 8's is one option and two 16's is the other option. Configuring the 8's with two on one side and one on the other is the way to go, although the code doesn't require a certain configuration.
I was referring to using screws for sheathing or siding. It says deformed nails are required (ring or spiral). I would think screws would hold better than nails.
bluefitness is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2008, 02:06 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Quote:
Originally Posted by DangerMouse View Post
who said anything about structual framing? i said cheap vinyl siding.... and if the wind WAS going to blow it off, the plastic almost certainly would break off and blow away before a nail OR a screw would pull out.... screws in sheathing is just dumb.

DM
When we're talking about attachment of framing members and sheathing, it goes without saying that we're talking about structural framing. You mentioned vinyl siding and I was responding the the OP's question.
Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2008, 02:09 PM   #7
Registered User
 
Termite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,520
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Fastener sizes listed in code books


Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefitness View Post
I was referring to using screws for sheathing or siding. It says deformed nails are required (ring or spiral). I would think screws would hold better than nails.
I understand the thought process, although the idea of attaching a piece of sheathing to the studs is to provide lateral strength in the wall, not to keep the material from popping off. So, those fasteners are working in shear and not tension. In shear, nails are much much stronger than screws. If the wall panels were resisting tension forces, screws might win out.

Advertisement

Termite is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
code details for boxes kama Electrical 6 01-30-2009 11:25 AM
Another Bryant 383KVA with code 31 problems rpgIVguru HVAC 1 02-05-2007 02:47 PM
1950's Roof Framing Strength KempLN Building & Construction 21 06-17-2006 11:06 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts