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-   -   Fasten anchors into the brick or the mortar? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/fasten-anchors-into-brick-mortar-112493/)

spaceman spif 07-31-2011 01:35 AM

Fasten anchors into the brick or the mortar?
 
My friend just bought an old farmhouse and he wants me to help him mount his plasma tv above a brick fireplace. They won't be using the fireplace, so heat is not an issue.

My question is this - do I fasten the anchors for the tv into the brick or the mortar? I've read a few sites on the internet (including this one) and only got more confused as some said you should only drill into the mortar, and others have said only drill into the brick. Has anyone done this with success? If so, how did they do it?

(Both the brick and the mortar looked fine - no cracks or chips)

stuart45 07-31-2011 04:50 AM

There is no definite answer to this, as it can vary from job to job.
Generally it's best to go into the bed joint if the mortar and position of the fixing allow this. Have a read of this.
http://www.simian-risk.com/informati...0Brickwork.pdf

spaceman spif 07-31-2011 10:19 AM

Very good article, thanks!

Now I just have to go translate some of those "British" terms into "American"... :wink:

Ron6519 07-31-2011 05:47 PM

If at all possible, I put the holes in the mortar. If something changes, it's easier to patch the mortar then a hole in the brick.
I see no issue with the holding power of either material.

Mr Chips 07-31-2011 08:39 PM

You didn't mention what type of anchors are you planning to use. I usually like to use sleeve anchors in brick because the tend to be soft and often contain voids.

spaceman spif 08-01-2011 11:16 AM

My first thought was sleeve anchors, but if someone else has used tapcons with success I might have considered those. I need to go back and check the size of the mortar joints so I know what size fasteners will fit in there.

Most of the info I've read so far recommends fastening into the mortar.

JustADoc 08-01-2011 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceman spif (Post 698064)
My first thought was sleeve anchors, but if someone else has used tapcons with success I might have considered those. I need to go back and check the size of the mortar joints so I know what size fasteners will fit in there.

Most of the info I've read so far recommends fastening into the mortar.

I tried tapcons in brick at our home and they eventually worked their way loose. I suspect there were void areas in the mortar and we weren't fully seated. I would definitely use a sleeve anchor or something similar.

You should consider, if you aren't already planning to, anchoring a piece of plywood to the wall instead of the actual mount. Then attach the mount to the plywood with wood screws. That way, should they purchase a new TV in the future and need a different size mount they won't have to mess with the anchors in the brick to switch it out.

spaceman spif 08-01-2011 11:05 PM

I checked out a Lowe's store tonight and I found some nail anchors that had very high load and shear values. I thought it could be good since I want the head of the fastener to be as flush as possible.

Specs are listed here...I was looking at the 1/4" x 1 1/2"...

http://www.cobraanchors.com/dbimages...t/spec/136.pdf

Anyone use these before?

spaceman spif 08-01-2011 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustADoc (Post 698550)
I tried tapcons in brick at our home and they eventually worked their way loose. I suspect there were void areas in the mortar and we weren't fully seated. I would definitely use a sleeve anchor or something similar.

You should consider, if you aren't already planning to, anchoring a piece of plywood to the wall instead of the actual mount. Then attach the mount to the plywood with wood screws. That way, should they purchase a new TV in the future and need a different size mount they won't have to mess with the anchors in the brick to switch it out.

They just spent all their money on the new house, so I don't think a new tv will be in the near future. :wink:

But the plywood is a good idea.

JustADoc 08-01-2011 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceman spif (Post 698552)
I checked out a Lowe's store tonight and I found some nail anchors that had very high load and shear values. I thought it could be good since I want the head of the fastener to be as flush as possible.

Specs are listed here...I was looking at the 1/4" x 1 1/2"...

http://www.cobraanchors.com/dbimages...t/spec/136.pdf

Anyone use these before?

I have, they're a lot like a lag shield anchor and work well. They can't hold tremendous weight but for the application you need them for they'll be fine!

Edit: By the way, with these and with the lag shields, the true strength depends so greatly on the cavity being exactly the right diameter. The greatest bit of freedom for these type of anchors and the sheer strength drops. I always start with a slightly smaller bit than my target diameter and work my way up with these smaller anchor sizes.

spaceman spif 08-01-2011 11:17 PM

Think it's worth it to shoot some epoxy in the hole before I put the fastener in?

JustADoc 08-01-2011 11:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceman spif (Post 698560)
Think it's worth it to shoot some epoxy in the hole before I put the fastener in?

I probably wouldn't. I don't think it would hurt anything but it would probably just ooze back out when you drive your nail in. If the hole is right the nail will be tough to drive in and it will take an act of God to remove it.

Just take it slow and make sure you're level - not hard at all!

Mr Chips 08-02-2011 08:08 AM

Nail-ins work well and only require a 1/4" hole. They make some that have a phillips head. You still bang them in with a hammer, but if you ever wanted to remove them you can use a screwgun to back out the nail far enough to release the expansion and allow you to use a claw hammer and remove.

If you are going to use the Zamac Nail-ins in the joints, I would use the plywood backing idea, and maybe use a single sleeve anchor that went into brick just for insurance. I'd put the sleeve anchor high and in the center, so that when it's time to sell the house they could remove the plywood and either patch the hole or hang a decorative wreath from it and it wouldn't look out of place

Don't bother with epoxy and mechanical anchors in the same hole. For the epoxy to do any good you have to maintain certain annular distances between the sides of the hole and the anchor which would require a hole too big to make the nail-in effective. You'll just end up with a mess


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