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-   -   Exterior Wall sheathing spacing and cutting Questions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/exterior-wall-sheathing-spacing-cutting-questions-157018/)

RM575 09-16-2012 09:08 PM

Exterior Wall sheathing spacing and cutting Questions
 
Hi all,
I'm building a 11' x 15' outdoor workshop on a concrete slab with 6" stem wall. I've got my 2 x 4, 16" OC, framing up to the top plate and will be doing a cap plate then sheathing with 7/16" ply vertical orientation. The framed wall from bottom of mudsill to top of cap plate is 81.5". I want to install the sheathing to the top of the cap plate, overlap the mudsill completely and onto the concrete stem wall by 1/2".

My concern is on the stud layout. It's nicely framed for drywall, but now I find that I need to install a few more studs on two, maybe three, walls so I don't have to do a lot of cuts on the exterior sheathing.

I will have to rip some sheets down, vertically, to a width roughly 2.5' to 3.5', one down to 8" near a door. I'm going to space at 1/8" between sheets.

I have one wall where I may not need to sister any studs, but one of the sheets will only rest on about 1/2" of the stud. Should I sister a stud there to give it more support? Or is it ok to leave a larger gap at the corner so this sheet sits on more of the stud? How close are the sheets to be at the corners? Do they butt against each other? Can I have a gap wider than 1/8" at the corners?

I have a door opening at the end of a long wall where I'll have only 8" from the corner to the rough opening. Is it ok to piece a sheet for the header and run it all the way to the corner? Like done when drywalling above a door?

Thanks for the help.

joecaption 09-16-2012 09:15 PM

Can you post a picture?
Why the odd ball size for a shed?
That's part of the reason for all your troubles.

RM575 09-16-2012 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1011273)
Can you post a picture?
Why the odd ball size for a shed?
That's part of the reason for all your troubles.

You mean the 11 x 15 size and the wall height? If so, because the city had some limitations as to setback and height, which forced me to a certain position on my lot and a lower height to come in at or under the height requirement.

As far a cutting plywood sheets, I don't mind cutting some off the long end of a 4x8 sheet. My concern it the ripping it down to "skinny" widths.

I don't yet have any photos of it framed.

GBrackins 09-16-2012 10:04 PM

nails should be no closer than 3/8" from the edge of the sheathing. if you only have a half-inch you nail would be in the outer 1/8 inch of the stud ....... sounds like sister time to me

RM575 09-16-2012 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1011307)
nails should be no closer than 3/8" from the edge of the sheathing. if you only have a half-inch you nail would be in the outer 1/8 inch of the stud ....... sounds like sister time to me


Yep. It looks like I'll need to sister 3 or 4 studs in all. How about the corners? What gap or spacing is required there?

GBrackins 09-16-2012 10:08 PM

I always butted my joints on corners, make sure you've got studs behind to nail to

RM575 09-16-2012 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1011312)
I always butted my joints on corners, make sure you've got studs behind to nail to


Yep. All seams or joints will land solidly on studs. The corners are beefy with studs.

I thought all sides of the sheathing had to have gaps or spacing for expansion? Do you butt the sheets against each other at the corners, sheets making contact, without such spacing?

Joe Carola 09-16-2012 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RM575

Yep. It looks like I'll need to sister 3 or 4 studs in all. How about the corners? What gap or spacing is required there?

Don't understand your problem. If everything is laid out 16" centers....why in the world would you have to add any studs? There's no reason unless you laid it out wrong.

GBrackins 09-16-2012 10:26 PM

if the sheet you are putting on the corner measures a full 4' in width, then I'd leave an 1/8" space between them, if the sheet measures less then I'd go a hair more

RM575 09-16-2012 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe Carola (Post 1011321)
Don't understand your problem. If everything is laid out 16" centers....why in the world would you have to add any studs? There's no reason unless you laid it out wrong.


I had to space some studs closer on one wall to accommodate a subpanel where the underground conduit comes through the mudsill. And, a second panel for low voltage a few feet away on the same wall where that conduit comes up. On that wall, 11' in length, I just need to add one stud. So, probably not 3 or 4, but rather 2.

On the opposite wall, I didn't place a stud or two right on the spot. So, that's where one sheet would rest on only 1/2" of a stud. Close but not right.

On the wall that has a door and a window, I'm probably ok. But, I had a question on how best to sheath with small pieces.

RM575 09-16-2012 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBrackins (Post 1011323)
if the sheet you are putting on the corner measures a full 4' in width, then I'd leave an 1/8" space between them, if the sheet measures less then I'd go a hair more


Thanks. I think where two sheets meet at a corner, I'll leave a gap of 1/8" and won't let them touch.

GBrackins 09-16-2012 10:53 PM

sounds like a plan!

Good luck!

hand drive 09-18-2012 10:09 AM

for the purpose of wall shear strength always plan at least one full piece of sheathing at one corner on each of the walls, and for long walls both outside corners for each wall is even better... working from both outside corners inward leaves odd vertical cut rips somewhere on the wall but that's the way it is and if the plwood is nice and plumb rips are easy. for the full 4x8 outside bracing sheathing nail it really good to both bottom and top plates and rim boards if you have them.
Nail a 6" to 8" nail separation pattern along the horizontal/vertical butt seams and 12" to 16" nail separation pattern in the field. make sure that wall framing is plumb before adding sheathing...

RM575 09-18-2012 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1012373)
for the purpose of wall shear strength always plan at least one full piece of sheathing at one corner on each of the walls, and for long walls both outside corners for each wall is even better... working from both outside corners inward leaves odd vertical cut rips somewhere on the wall but that's the way it is and if the plwood is nice and plumb rips are easy. for the full 4x8 outside bracing sheathing nail it really good to both bottom and top plates and rim boards if you have them.
Nail a 6" to 8" nail separation pattern along the horizontal/vertical butt seams and 12" to 16" nail separation pattern in the field. make sure that wall framing is plumb before adding sheathing...

Thank you for the tips. I was going to start at a corner and work across the wall, winding up with a shorter piece on the other end. The end with the shorter piece would be 3' wide rather than 4', so I don't think it will cause a problem for the structure. But, I like your method better and will see if I can do that.

No rim board, just mudsill and top plates, and sheathing will fully cover them. I'm doubling up the studs where sheets butt together so I'll have better support for nailing and won't have to put my nails so close to the edges. And, I'm using a few 4x4's as well for the same thing.

The only place where it will get complicated will be around the door and window. The door is close to a corner which gives me about 8" of vertical wall to sheath. So, I was going to set my nailing pattern closer on that section.

I'm using 15/32" plywood, but haven't chosen my nails. What nails would you suggest? I'm using a framing nailer by the way.

Thanks again.

hand drive 09-18-2012 12:53 PM

quoted from original message... thanks

Quote:

Originally Posted by RM575 (Post 1012438)
Thank you for the tips. I was going to start at a corner and work across the wall, winding up with a shorter piece on the other end. The end with the shorter piece would be 3' wide rather than 4', so I don't think it will cause a problem for the structure. But, I like your method better and will see if I can do that.

the three foot piece will be fine for the corner and what I forgot to mention is that the wall has to be framed to accept the full size end pieces so that will pose a problem in mosr framing situations...

No rim board, just mudsill and top plates, and sheathing will fully cover them. I'm doubling up the studs where sheets butt together so I'll have better support for nailing and won't have to put my nails so close to the edges. And, I'm using a few 4x4's as well for the same thing.

because of twists and warping doubled up 2x usually are better than single 4x, especially with the trees we have to build with theses days, maybe 50 years ago no problem...

The only place where it will get complicated will be around the door and window. The door is close to a corner which gives me about 8" of vertical wall to sheath. So, I was going to set my nailing pattern closer on that section.
I sometimes frame fully around doors and windows and cut the holes out later always avoiding breaks at the edges of doors and windows, or pre cut the pieces with that in mind.

I'm using 15/32" plywood, but haven't chosen my nails. What nails would you suggest? I'm using a framing nailer by the way.
Thanks again.

2 3/8" ring shank or even 3" ring shank.



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