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Old 08-06-2011, 07:31 AM   #1
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Exterior sheathing


Is it possible to "swap-out" the old Celotex panels on the exterior of my house and upgrade to the typical 1/2 inch OSB exterior sheathing? I was thinking just maybe 2 or so panels at a time for structural concerns.

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Old 08-06-2011, 07:50 AM   #2
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Exterior sheathing


Celotex lends very little to structure. If you pull one panel on each wall and replace first, the rest should be fine to remove before re-installing structural sheathing. If you have structural panels on the corners, which is very common, you can remove all Celotex before replacing.

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Old 08-06-2011, 08:07 AM   #3
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Exterior sheathing


Celotex lends very little to structure

That was my thinking. I wanted to do this and then re-side the house at that time too. Also, wanted to apply Tyvek house wrap as well. I have brick vaneer on front only so I can't get to that part. Another question ~ the OSB should cover all the way down and over the band joist, correct? The Celotex seems to stop at the band joist.

I joke about this from time to time, but I really thing a couple of guys got to drinkin, got board and decided to throw this house together over the course of a weekend! I'm gonna try to find some real history/data on this house.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:16 AM   #4
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Exterior sheathing


About the band joist, it is a very good idea to cover the band joist, especially in areas prone to high wind (hurricane, tornado) or flooding. I spent 8 months on the Gulf Coast after Katrina and Rita doing inspections, and one memorable inspection involved a neighborhood of expensive homes on piles, each about 10 feet off the ground. The houses that had sheathing that extended over the band joists, and where the sheathing was either screwed (structural screws) or properly nailed to the band joists, were effectively intact, although they had sustained about 1 foot of flood damage.

Some of the houses where the sheathing had stopped above the band joists (most of them were done that way) had sustained massive structural damage, probably from floating debris impact. We estimated that at peak the water was moving at least 4 mph through there, carrying trees, pieces of houses, propane tanks, fishing boats etc. A few of the houses had lifted off their piers because they were not adequately tied to the piers; many of them were friction fit only. Quite the sight.

So yes, I strongly recommend carrying the sheathing to the bottom of the band joist, but not directly touching concrete. If you want to go all the way to concrete, you need to wrap the bottom of the sheathing with a waterproofing membrane like ice and water shield, else you are likely to get rot. And one other thought, exterior grade 3/4 plywood seemed to perform better than OSB, I know it costs more, but not that much more, and in my experience it is stronger against impact, if that is a possible concern.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:33 AM   #5
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Exterior sheathing


Thanks for the info Dan. Yes, I'll look at the 3/4 plywood when I actually execute this project. I think it would make better nailing for the siding too. I'm hoping that covering it along with insulating the other side in the crawl space will make for a much warmer floor this winter!
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