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-   -   Expand a garage loft. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/expand-garage-loft-127734/)

Nick M 12-26-2011 05:49 PM

Expand a garage loft.
 
3 Attachment(s)
Greetings,

To start off, I'm not as skilled in doing these projects as you guys are...

In my garage, I have a partial loft area from the wall to the middle of the room, which is secured to the rafter on the roof.

I'm afraid that the weight from everything is too much for the roof.

It looks crude to me. I'd like to re-do this the best (right) way! It would also open up more space for storage.

I want to span the loft to both sides of the garage. about 13 feet wide.

What is the best way to secure a platform to both sides of the wall?

Which type/size of lumbar would I need to use for cross beams and thickness for the sheets (platform)?

I have attached 3 photos to show.


Thank You for your time

titanoman 12-26-2011 06:02 PM

That looks very hazardous. You need to be careful going anywhere around that. It could come down on your head!
Your roof cannot handle this weight.
You need to take that stuff down and then start over, from scratch
(including running a beam from wall to wall to take all the weight of the loft and take the weight off the roof).

Sent from a Samsung Galaxy S2

Nick M 12-26-2011 06:32 PM

I know!!! It is scary to have that weight up there..

:D

I'd like to see if anyone knows how I should build the "correct" support on the walls to hold the cross beams...

Daniel Holzman 12-26-2011 06:43 PM

There are probably half a dozen acceptable ways to frame the loft, the one chosen is not among them. There is not likely to be a "right" way, as each technique has advantages and disadvantages. I assume you are going to get a permit, so you may want to start by discussing the project with the building inspector, as there may be specific standards you need to adhere to, including loading capacity, firestopping, and connections. Or you can discuss in general terms alternatives on this forum. Remember, this is a DIY chat room, so it typically caters to people who want to do the work themselves, so you may want to describe your abilities in the framing area, as some techniques are more difficult than others.

titanoman 12-26-2011 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick M
I know!!! It is scary to have that weight up there..

:D

I'd like to see if anyone knows how I should build the "correct" support on the walls to hold the cross beams...

Assuming you have solid enough footings, you need to triple up the studs that will be under a beam (you said 13'. Probably dbl 2x12's) that will span the two walls and take all the weight of the loft.
It should not be tied in to the roof at all.

Sent from a Samsung Galaxy S2

AndyGump 12-26-2011 09:34 PM

It looks like you have a very low pitched garage roof there.

It also looks like you are under the 2010 Florida Building code, which looks to be based on the 2009 IRC.

Get someone to design a solution (residential designer, Archy, structural engineer) for you then go build it.

Andy.

Nick M 12-26-2011 09:52 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Yeah, I don't know that much about framing. I would be able to get some hands to help install the project.
I should say, I will get a permit and inspector to make sure it is done right.
I would like to do more of the "grunt" work and save some $.

assuming that my footing will support the weight, How could I mount them to the wall?

The width of the garage is 12' 9"

I would like the length to stay the same at 8'

I have attached a quick illustration of what I thought:
having the doubled up 2x4 sit upon a 2x4 bolted to the wall. Then have a 2x4 also run across the wall to the next beam. having 4 of these for support.

Is there any resources I could use to find more information on this type of project?

Nick M 12-26-2011 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyGump (Post 804037)
It looks like you have a very low pitched garage roof there.

It also looks like you are under the 2010 Florida Building code, which looks to be based on the 2009 IRC.

Get someone to design a solution (residential designer, Archy, structural engineer) for you then go build it.

Andy.

Yeah, It is enough space to store boxes & bins.

I think it would be best to get a designer. What price range do you think we would be looking at?

I know there will be a few aspects to this project.
Plan, Build

Like I said, I would like to do some of the work myself, to save money.

AndyGump 12-26-2011 10:00 PM

Why don't you have someone design it for you?

They will take into account all aspects of the project then you can take the plans to the Building Department, get their approval. Once you do that the plans will have all the info needed to put it together.
Then you can build the thing and have confidence that it will not all come tumbling down.

Takes all the guesswork out of it. Your designer should provide all that anyway.

Andy.

AndyGump 12-26-2011 10:02 PM

Looks like we posted close to the same time.

Not too much really, $500.00 range.

You get the cities approval and all is right with the world.

Andy.

Nick M 12-26-2011 10:10 PM

Thanks, Andy!!

Nick M 12-26-2011 10:27 PM

How do I find a reputable designer that handles these types of projects?

I tried a couple of keywords and can't find anyone locally.

I'm in Daytona Beach, FL (my city is Holly Hill, Florida)

Thank You all for your help.

-Nick

AndyGump 12-26-2011 10:47 PM

Well I do that. Florida, California bunch of other states.

Andy.

Nick M 12-27-2011 12:17 AM

O_o

Great!
I'll Private message you.


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