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Old 09-27-2007, 12:36 AM   #16
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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Originally Posted by scorrpio View Post
You can't do this. You want to form a 'dimple' around the screwhead that will be filled with compound and hide the screw That is the purpose of that 'cup' on the bits shown. Finishing by hand you'll end up with no dimples and hiding screw heads will be almost impossible. Drive them all the way with the bit.
I know this is a very minor detail, but the cup on those bits is there to cause the philips head to disengage from the screw, just when the screw head has been sunk below the plane of the wallboard. You don't need to dimple the paper around the screw, you just need to have the screwhead a bit below the level of the rest of the board.

The cup head makes a recess, a bit wider than the screw, but that's just a side-effect of it's purpose - to disengage the driver head when the cup contacts the board.

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Old 09-27-2007, 09:23 AM   #17
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


I don't really want to use nails because them I may break the paper with my hammer?

I have seen drywall screws in drywall and I know what they look like.
Could I not just screw it in by hand to just below the surface of the drywall so that it creates a "dimple" in the drywall?
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:30 AM   #18
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


I think screw by hand is more difficult than it appears to be... but in theory... yes as hand has a more control ... but it will be really tiring to do that ... expecially in odd places... and it requires a lot of torque to turn the screw... I did try to fix a few in the beginning when I don't have the drywall gun... if after I have the gun... I do some fix by hand too but most of them not successful because the screw is not 90 degree in... a screw is 90 degree in is the key to a success installation...
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:03 AM   #19
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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I don't really want to use nails because them I may break the paper with my hammer?

I have seen drywall screws in drywall and I know what they look like.
Could I not just screw it in by hand to just below the surface of the drywall so that it creates a "dimple" in the drywall?
Is someone going to be helping you hang the drywall? How many sheets are you doing?

I can't imagine screwing in drywall by hand. I think my wrist would go gimpy after about 3 screws.

My recommendation: Treat yourself to a 12V cordless drill/driver. It'll be lightweight, but have plenty of power for most drilling/driving that you do. It'll be easier to control speed and it will have a clutch. You seem to be pretty serious about DIY renovation stuff, and I really think this one tool is worth buying. (Besides, you can take advantage of that historically strong Loonie! ) You can get one for $75-$150 (depending on the quality).

If you really don't want to do that, then you should rent a drywall gun for an afternoon or a day, to hang your drywall. It'll probably cost $10.
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:13 AM   #20
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


I understand DIYer's concern though regarding buying/renting tool. First, DIYers normally don't finish thing in one afternoon... instead... they normally takes days if not months and sometimes years... to finish.... so renting would be too expensive.... for buying tool though... it is good...except most of the time it only used "one time" or "one time" every 10 years... so the feeling of "what a waste" .... the other solution is to buy it... use it.. the sell it in internet... but this approach comes with all the selling hassle... so basically there isn't really a clean solution I can discover yet...
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:15 AM   #21
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


I'm not suggesting she buy a drywall gun. I'm suggesting she buy a regular 12V drill/driver. I can't imagine that a DIY-project will pass where she's not using that tool every day. I personally can't imagine doing anything without a cordless driver.
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:18 AM   #22
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http://www.mytoolstore.com/makita/ma....html#6270dwpe
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:16 AM   #23
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


Hey, Yummy,

Just my two cents....I just finished hanging drywall in my basement. 50 sheets, ceiling and walls. I used an electric screw gun that had a clutch and a "dinmpler" bit (like the pics earlier in this thread). I was lucky enough to be able to borrow it from a friend that has a rather extensive tool collection. You could also use a regular cordless drill with a phillips head bit and just go real slow with it until the head of the screw is just into the paper ( I used both methods and both worked OK, the screw gun is a bit faster though). I used 1-1/4" coarse thread screws and was hanging 1/2" sheets. Everything went very smoothly. Every once in a while I would get the srew a little crooked or not get it in the whole way....so I broke out the handy phillips head screw driver and sank them in by hand (2-3 turns). I think, like it was said earlier, that the most important thing is that the head is sunk into the paper, not necessarily that it is "dimpled" properly. When you go to mud it ( I am taping and mudding now) the mud will fill in the whole left by the srew head whether it has a nice "dimple" or not. Just take your time, mark your studs on the drywall so you know where to screw it and away you go. Oh, and a good drywall square and SHARP balde in your knife help a ton!!! If you are hanging the drywall on the ceiling rent a drywall lift!!! I rented on for a day for $25 and had the ceiling done in 6 hours with a buddy helping. Hope this helps!!
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:18 PM   #24
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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Originally Posted by NateHanson View Post
Is someone going to be helping you hang the drywall? How many sheets are you doing?

I can't imagine screwing in drywall by hand. I think my wrist would go gimpy after about 3 screws.

My recommendation: Treat yourself to a 12V cordless drill/driver. It'll be lightweight, but have plenty of power for most drilling/driving that you do. It'll be easier to control speed and it will have a clutch. You seem to be pretty serious about DIY renovation stuff, and I really think this one tool is worth buying. (Besides, you can take advantage of that historically strong Loonie! ) You can get one for $75-$150 (depending on the quality).

If you really don't want to do that, then you should rent a drywall gun for an afternoon or a day, to hang your drywall. It'll probably cost $10.
Like Kui****g said I probably would not get that much use from the cordless drill, as I already have a drill. And if I tell my husband that I want another tool, he may have a fit.

(Since I don't think I will be using it much afterwards.)

He is helping me with the drywall as I can't lift it by myself (if he doesn't, I won't be so "yummy" )
In terms of renting a drywall lift, I will never be able to do it in a short period of time.
This project is a once in a while thing.
I started last October, and I'm now just ready for drywall. I could go weeks even months without being able to work on it.

Also, what I will be doing is cutting the sheets probably in half, (at least for the ceilin anyway), as they are too heavy to lift, so I guess I plan on being really good at taping.

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Old 09-27-2007, 12:19 PM   #25
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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Originally Posted by DIY4EVER View Post
Hey, Yummy,

Just my two cents....I just finished hanging drywall in my basement. 50 sheets, ceiling and walls. I used an electric screw gun that had a clutch and a "dinmpler" bit (like the pics earlier in this thread). I was lucky enough to be able to borrow it from a friend that has a rather extensive tool collection. You could also use a regular cordless drill with a phillips head bit and just go real slow with it until the head of the screw is just into the paper ( I used both methods and both worked OK, the screw gun is a bit faster though). I used 1-1/4" coarse thread screws and was hanging 1/2" sheets. Everything went very smoothly. Every once in a while I would get the srew a little crooked or not get it in the whole way....so I broke out the handy phillips head screw driver and sank them in by hand (2-3 turns). I think, like it was said earlier, that the most important thing is that the head is sunk into the paper, not necessarily that it is "dimpled" properly. When you go to mud it ( I am taping and mudding now) the mud will fill in the whole left by the srew head whether it has a nice "dimple" or not. Just take your time, mark your studs on the drywall so you know where to screw it and away you go. Oh, and a good drywall square and SHARP balde in your knife help a ton!!! If you are hanging the drywall on the ceiling rent a drywall lift!!! I rented on for a day for $25 and had the ceiling done in 6 hours with a buddy helping. Hope this helps!!
Thanks for sharing your experiences.

I have a wall going down to the basement that has drywall on it, I think after I purchase some drywall screws I will try putting one in by hand.
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:21 PM   #26
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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Originally Posted by KUI****G View Post
I understand DIYer's concern though regarding buying/renting tool. First, DIYers normally don't finish thing in one afternoon... instead... they normally takes days if not months and sometimes years... to finish.... so renting would be too expensive.... for buying tool though... it is good...except most of the time it only used "one time" or "one time" every 10 years... so the feeling of "what a waste" .... the other solution is to buy it... use it.. the sell it in internet... but this approach comes with all the selling hassle... so basically there isn't really a clean solution I can discover yet...
I did think about buying the drywall lift through ebay, but then I have to go through the headaches of selling it.

So, my husband and I will hang it together.

Even if I have to cut it.

Thanks Kui
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:26 PM   #27
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


I don't understand how a corded hammer drill can get you through a basement remodel. You're spending thousands of dollars on supplies for this remodel. I'm sure a cordless drill would save you many many hours of your time. That's money well spent in my book.

I'm just not sure you realize how universally useful a cordless drill is in remodeling.

You can EVEN stir your coffee with it!!!!!
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:32 PM   #28
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


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I don't understand how a corded hammer drill can get you through a basement remodel. You're spending thousands of dollars on supplies for this remodel. I'm sure a cordless drill would save you many many hours of your time. That's money well spent in my book.

I'm just not sure you realize how universally useful a cordless drill is in remodeling.

You can EVEN stir your coffee with it!!!!!
I agree.

Yumm,

You sound like you enjoy DIY projects and I think you'll find a cordless drill invaluable in the future. 10 projects down the road you'll be commenting on how it is the most useful tool you've ever purchased. Great deals on the internet and they aren't that expensive to begin with.

Also, round up one more strapping young lad to help you lift the sheets to the ceiling. Shouldn't take long; they go up quick. You'll realize soon enough that you hate the mud and sand part of the job. It is the messiest and most difficult part, so the fewer seams the better. Drywall has natural tapered edges that should be used whenever possible. This allows the tape to sit below the surface. Concealing a joint through the middle of a sheet is much more difficult as they rarely butt perfectly and there is no recessed edge to hide the tape.

Last edited by Cache; 09-27-2007 at 12:37 PM.
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Old 09-27-2007, 01:02 PM   #29
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Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill


hammer drill isn't really built to drive screws... it will be burnt if attempt to be used to drive screws... I have the same problem... bought a cheap right hand Chicargo drill (not driver), use it to drive a screw, burnt right away... that was the time I learnt there is different between drilling and driving.... anyhow... I luckily got refund as Ebay pay you money if your tool not working in a first couple of days....

if you are going to buy a cordless driver, I would go for the quality one... if not the best... though... I agree this thing is so useful... once I got my Milwaukee 18v.... I kind of forget all other cordless I had and used this only one for anything... this guy never run out of battery....

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Old 09-27-2007, 02:20 PM   #30
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Well, im my general experience, having the screw seat in a round dimple makes for a better mudding. My own drill of choice is still a variable-speed reversible corded Dewalt I bought back in 1995. I am not into cordless - karma thing, batteries hate me. Anytime I pick something up with a battery in it and need to use it like now, it dies within 5 min. Anyways, I got lots of long extension cords.

Make a scale drawing of your wall framing, and decide how you'll panel it. Precut your rock as needed, and mark the framing on the face so you know where to drive screws. Then, if you get a couple helpers, you can hang it all in 2-3 hours.

Do NOT cut panels needlessly. Taping, mudding and sanding joints is not fun.

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