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-   -   Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/drywall-screws-fine-coarse-tip-my-drill-11852/)

yummy mummy 09-26-2007 08:22 AM

Drywall screws? Fine or coarse, tip for my drill
 
I am about to start hanging drywall, and would like to know which drywall screws are the best to use for hanging drywall? The fine thread ones or the coarse thread ones?
I assume the 1 1/4 inch are long enough?

Also, if I buy one of those tips to put on my power drill to hang the drywall, do they work well?

Thanks

scorrpio 09-26-2007 10:39 AM

Coarse thread, in my experience, is better. The more rotations is takes to get the screw in, the bigger chance to strip out the head. For 1/2" rock, I prefer 1 5/8". And it takes some practice to get it right, but I simply use a DeWalt dimpling bit. Clutch might be easier, but I never got around to buying one...

Crackers 09-26-2007 11:52 AM

1 inch into the wood (min) is what I use as a guideline. For furniture making it is different as you use less nails and more joints...

Sammy 09-26-2007 06:04 PM

Definitely coarse thread drywall screws..

1 1/4" should be fine if your attaching directly to the studs.

As long as your speaking of the screwdriver bit with the spin off/dimpling cup on it versus just a regular phillips head bit then yes, they do o.k. for a homeowner. Especially if your cordless has a clutch setting on it you can dial it in and get good results on smaller jobs.

AtlanticWBConst. 09-26-2007 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 64850)
I am about to start hanging drywall, and would like to know which drywall screws are the best to use for hanging drywall? The fine thread ones or the coarse thread ones?
I assume the 1 1/4 inch are long enough?

It's already been covered by other members, but I'll clarify anyways. Since you have framed your basement with wood materials and will be installing 1/2" sheetrock, you should use: Course thread, 1-1/4" drywall screws. This is the industry standard.

FWIW: Fine thread is for steel. Course thread is for wood. Longer drywall screws are for double layer or thicker sheetrock.

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 64850)
Also, if I buy one of those tips to put on my power drill to hang the drywall, do they work well?
Thanks

They will work. You can give it a try. If you don't like what you see, then try a "drywall screw-gun".

The key to screwing in sheetrock is that you don't want the head of the screw to penetrate the paper surface of the sheetrock. If the screw head tears it, you will most likely end up with a "popped screw" in your wall. The paper surface is what holds the gypsum together. If you tear through it with a screw, then that screw is not holding the sheet.


Good Luck!

Cole 09-26-2007 06:36 PM

Cheap Route:
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/1431/merdw2pszr9.jpg

Better Route:
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/3...mwajmplnw1.jpg

Both will be able to be used with any regular screw gun.

Cole 09-26-2007 06:38 PM

Or this:
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/4...979k2tnln3.jpg

Sammy 09-26-2007 06:49 PM

Wow... My wife always said I was cheap and now here is proof of it!

I got the cheapy but it works o.k. for doing a few sheets of drywall here and there.

Cole 09-26-2007 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 64992)

I got the cheapy but it works o.k. for doing a few sheets of drywall here and there.

If you are just going to hang a couple of sheets and wont be doing any other drywall work in the future, the cheap version is the best imho!

yummy mummy 09-26-2007 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 64975)
It's already been covered by other members, but I'll clarify anyways. Since you have framed your basement with wood materials and will be installing 1/2" sheetrock, you should use: Course thread, 1-1/4" drywall screws. This is the industry standard.

FWIW: Fine thread is for steel. Course thread is for wood. Longer drywall screws are for double layer or thicker sheetrock.



They will work. You can give it a try. If you don't like what you see, then try a "drywall screw-gun".

The key to screwing in sheetrock is that you don't want the head of the screw to penetrate the paper surface of the sheetrock. If the screw head tears it, you will most likely end up with a "popped screw" in your wall. The paper surface is what holds the gypsum together. If you tear through it with a screw, then that screw is not holding the sheet.


Good Luck!

Thanks Atlantic

If I use one of those bits that I would put in front of my drill, and I only bring it 3/4 of the way in and then finish it by hand, in that way I will make sure that I don't punture the paper.
Do you think this would be a better way since I have absolutely zippo experience in this?

yummy mummy 09-26-2007 10:02 PM

Cole
 
Thanks for the great pics.
Now I know what I'm looking for.

yummy mummy 09-26-2007 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 64974)
Definitely coarse thread drywall screws..

1 1/4" should be fine if your attaching directly to the studs.

As long as your speaking of the screwdriver bit with the spin off/dimpling cup on it versus just a regular phillips head bit then yes, they do o.k. for a homeowner. Especially if your cordless has a clutch setting on it you can dial it in and get good results on smaller jobs.

I don't have a cordless, just a regular hammer drill that plugs into the wall.

I wonder if that will work.
The only thing is, that it is really heavy and I don't think I will be able to have good control, as I have to control it by hand, and sometimes it goes faster than I would like.

I will have to try, if not then I will be doing it by hand.
(Screwing them in by hand)

Cole 09-26-2007 10:28 PM

You could always use nails?

NateHanson 09-26-2007 10:42 PM

Yes, if your only driver is a hammer drill, I think you'll want to nail it with drywall nails.

scorrpio 09-26-2007 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 65027)
Thanks Atlantic

If I use one of those bits that I would put in front of my drill, and I only bring it 3/4 of the way in and then finish it by hand, in that way I will make sure that I don't punture the paper.
Do you think this would be a better way since I have absolutely zippo experience in this?

You can't do this. You want to form a 'dimple' around the screwhead that will be filled with compound and hide the screw That is the purpose of that 'cup' on the bits shown. Finishing by hand you'll end up with no dimples and hiding screw heads will be almost impossible. Drive them all the way with the bit.


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