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Old 12-15-2010, 12:52 PM   #1
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Hi Guys!

So… I am finally starting to reconstruct everything that I have destroyed over the last few months and I need your help.

I have put the new tub in its place and I am not sure what to do about the gap. I have it flush with the studs on the back (long) side, and the right side where the drain is. There is one twisted stud that I will have to shave down and put a straight one beside it, but other than that, two of the three sides are looking good.

As you can see in the attached image(s), there is roughly a 1” gap on the left side of the tub. Now, I am not sure how to word the rest of this post so please forgive me.

I plan on waterproofing this alcove with Kerdi, and need your help with hanging the drywall.

Should I use furring strips to fill the 1” gap on the left side, and then use 1/4” furring strips on top of that for the drywall? If I do that method, should I then continue to fur all of the studs on that wall with 1.25” furring strip to make the wall flat? Since the right (drain) side is already flush, should I also continue to fur that whole wall with 1/4” furring strips in order to make everything flat?

Does that make sense… it does in my head?

I’m worried about the butt joints and recessed joints when I hang the drywall… what kind of layout should I use? Should I use a solid sheet of drywall to do the whole wall including the alcove? Should I try to avoid recessed joints around the tub?


Thanks,

Ed










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Old 12-16-2010, 08:20 AM   #2
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Measure the gap. If it's 1/2", get some 1/2" plywood and rip 1 1/2" pieces and shim out the whole wall.
You're also going to need to add studding at the tub edge for the cement board to sheetrock transition.
Ron

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Old 12-16-2010, 02:24 PM   #3
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


On this topic, is it "standard" to insulate and sheet rock w/ the green "water resistant" sheet rock, slide the tub in, and then install whatever drainage plane you are going to use (tile, fiberglass surround, etc)? I completely forget whatever I did 30 yrs ago. thanks. j
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:47 PM   #4
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


I shim the walls so the tub lip is on the same plane as the wall. I then install the wall covering(cement board)so the board overlaps the tub edge, keeping the board 1/2" off the tub horizontals. I see no point in butting the sheet goods to the tub lip and caulking it. It's an asinine procedure.
I also don't like putting sheetrock that close to water, so even using Kerdi, I use cement board in the tub or shower. Getting water trapped behind the tile at the tub level will deteriorate the greenboard.
Ron
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Old 12-16-2010, 04:53 PM   #5
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
Measure the gap. If it's 1/2", get some 1/2" plywood and rip 1 1/2" pieces and shim out the whole wall.
You're also going to need to add studding at the tub edge for the cement board to sheetrock transition.
Ron

Thanks Ron...

Why use plywood instead of ripping 2x4s for the gap?
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:03 PM   #6
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Ron: I've always wondered about sheet rock there. Cement board makes more sense. thanks. j
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:06 PM   #7
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeystomach View Post
Thanks Ron...

Why use plywood instead of ripping 2x4s for the gap?
For plywood thick shims( 1/4, 1/2, 5/8 etc...), I use the plywood because it doesn't split like dimensional wood.
For thicker pieces I'll use solid wood.
Ron
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Old 12-16-2010, 07:38 PM   #8
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


I like to notch the studs where the tub lip meets it so everything is flush. Then, on the short wall I build the studs out with plywood strips to create the same flush finish.
Tiling is expensive, use water resistant backerboard and Redguard the hotspots or even the whole area. Better safe than sorry.
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Old 12-17-2010, 03:12 AM   #9
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


I just read this; info from one of the gypsum organizations, and it is speaking to green sheet rock: "Not suitable for use as a substrate for tile in wet areas such as tubs and showers, gang showers and other areas subject to
direct water exposure. Durock brand cement board is recommended
for these uses. (See Durock applications, Chapter 4,
“Backerboard Installation.”)" I guess that puts a cap on things. Cement board is the answer, as noted in a reply above.
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Old 12-17-2010, 08:38 AM   #10
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Drywall Install - Alcove Tub


Quote:
Originally Posted by jklingel View Post
I just read this; info from one of the gypsum organizations, and it is speaking to green sheet rock: "Not suitable for use as a substrate for tile in wet areas such as tubs and showers, gang showers and other areas subject to
direct water exposure. Durock brand cement board is recommended
for these uses. (See Durock applications, Chapter 4,
“Backerboard Installation.”)" I guess that puts a cap on things. Cement board is the answer, as noted in a reply above.
The Kerdi website is the problem with this confusion. They state you can use regular sheetrock under their product. They also don't follow standard water flashing procedures with the tub or shower installs. Having the walls go behind the tub and shower is just a disaster waiting to happen. A few pin holes or a misconceived application and you're screwed.
I like the product but would not follow their install recomendations as to water control.
Ron

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