DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Drywall Gaps (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/drywall-gaps-9149/)

leted_82 06-13-2007 11:58 PM

Drywall Gaps
 
I finally got drywall delivered, and have started putting it up. I find it somewhat difficult (first time working with drywall) to get the sheets cut to the exact right size. How much of a gap is acceptable between sheets, if any. Also, it seems that when screwing the cut edges of a sheet to the stud, you have to get pretty close to the edge because two sheets share a stud. I am having problems with the drywall cracking and pushing out the end of the sheet when the screw goes in. Is this normal, or how can I prevent it?

Thank you very much for all the help. It helps to know the right way to do things!

AtlanticWBConst. 06-14-2007 05:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leted_82 (Post 49020)
How much of a gap is acceptable between sheets, if any.

There should be NO GAPS at all.

Quote:

Originally Posted by leted_82 (Post 49020)
Also, it seems that when screwing the cut edges of a sheet to the stud, you have to get pretty close to the edge because two sheets share a stud.

That's right, so stagger the screws per eech sheet's side. What I mean is to place a screw on one sheet, and then place the screw on the other sheet about 1/2" to 1" above or below it. There are times were you may have to slightly angle the screw towards the stud.

Quote:

Originally Posted by leted_82 (Post 49020)
I am having problems with the drywall cracking and pushing out the end of the sheet when the screw goes in. Is this normal, or how can I prevent it?

There's not alot that you can do about this. The only solution is to place your screws away from the edge and to slightly angle them towards the studs as mentioned previously.
If there is alot of the ''push-out'', take your utility knife and clean up the edge of the sheet (loose gypsum) prior to installing the sheet next to it, so that you can get a clean tight fit and match-up of the two sheet ends to eachother.

crecore 06-14-2007 06:48 AM

you might also want to buy yourself a 60" sheetrock square, it helps a lot, they're probably $30-40. I dont recall exactly what I paid but I use that thing for a lot of woodworking projects too.

J187 06-14-2007 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leted_82 (Post 49020)
I finally got drywall delivered, and have started putting it up. I find it somewhat difficult (first time working with drywall) to get the sheets cut to the exact right size. How much of a gap is acceptable between sheets, if any. Also, it seems that when screwing the cut edges of a sheet to the stud, you have to get pretty close to the edge because two sheets share a stud. I am having problems with the drywall cracking and pushing out the end of the sheet when the screw goes in. Is this normal, or how can I prevent it?

Thank you very much for all the help. It helps to know the right way to do things!



I would recommend you get yourself a book or a good internet tutorial - there are lots of little subtle things you should do that may not be so intuitive. For instance, lining up seems around windows and door ways, affectively lining up joints to become either tapered joints or butt joints. Also, knowing when to apply horizontally or vertically (depending on ceiling height) in order to minimize joints. Really, there are just too many things to consider for you not to use some sort of guide when you are learning. You'll want to do the best hanging job possible - you will not want to have fix shortcomings in the mud stage. Although somewhat capable of compensating for small hanging issues, you will want to mud as little as humanly possible. If you haven't done it before, you will understand why once you begin.

OH, and to elaborate on Crecore's suggestion - I can't imagine drywalling without a drywall square. Although I've never used a 60" one, I have a couple 48" ones that you can get at any big box store for around $15-$20. They work fine, although bigger I suppose would be better/easier. Oh, and always make sure you are cutting w/ a sharp blade - I dont' care how many blades you go through, keep a fresh, sharp blade in your utility knife. The cleaner your cut, the easier your work will be. And don't overscore your cuts.

yummy mummy 06-14-2007 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 49037)
There should be NO GAPS at all.



That's right, so stagger the screws per eech sheet's side. What I mean is to place a screw on one sheet, and then place the screw on the other sheet about 1/2" to 1" above or below it. There are times were you may have to slightly angle the screw towards the stud.



There's not alot that you can do about this. The only solution is to place your screws away from the edge and to slightly angle them towards the studs as mentioned previously.
If there is alot of the ''push-out'', take your utility knife and clean up the edge of the sheet (loose gypsum) prior to installing the sheet next to it, so that you can get a clean tight fit and match-up of the two sheet ends to eachother.


Hi Atlantic:

If you angle the screw slightly, will the edge of the head of the screw not stick out, and if you put it in more, would it not break the paper of the drywall?

I have not tried hanging sheetrock yet, but I am just curious.

(I suspect, I will be ruining some drywall edges soon. :laughing: )

KUIPORNG 06-14-2007 10:22 AM

I kind of disagree with AtlanticWBConst this time (may be the first time)... and Yummy Mummy is correct in my point of view... Never should screw goes angle in... it is such a pain later on.... to avoid the crack thing... you just need to find a good spot to screw in as well as not too close to the edge... well I know can't be too far off as well.... there will be instance the screw break the board.. you just need to screw another one nearby...

Jeekinz 06-14-2007 11:04 AM

Picking up a drywall screwgun will avoid and screws being driven in too deep. If you come across a situation where theres a gap, fill the gap with joint compound before you apply the tape. This will fill the void and eliminate and cracking in the future. A slight, very slight angle on troublesome areas to catch the sud is fine, just make sure the high edge of the screw head is flush with the surface.

For cutting, I use a tape measure and a chalk line, then freehand the cuts.

send_it_all 06-14-2007 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 49071)
I kind of disagree with AtlanticWBConst this time (may be the first time)... and Yummy Mummy is correct in my point of view... Never should screw goes angle in... it is such a pain later on.... to avoid the crack thing... you just need to find a good spot to screw in as well as not too close to the edge... well I know can't be too far off as well.... there will be instance the screw break the board.. you just need to screw another one nearby...

He said "slightly" angle the screws. This is perfectly acceptable. In a perfect world, all studs would be perfectly plumb and the drywall would run straight down the center of the studs, leaving you ample room to screw straight in, yet not too close to the edge,..but that has never, in the history of man kind, been the case.

KUIPORNG 06-14-2007 11:42 AM

Very often I just screw in a 1x1 plywood pieces besides the stud and have more room for budding end to end drywalls

Jeekinz 06-14-2007 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 49081)
Very often I just screw in a 1x1 plywood pieces besides the stud and have more room for budding end to end drywalls

That means you'd be screwing into the end grain/laminates, which is not the correct practice for mechanical fasteners.

Same goes for end grain on solid material.

KUIPORNG 06-14-2007 02:46 PM

I see those use only small metal stuff or small wood stuff to join two drywall end when they are not ending into studs... and people don't want to cut them.... as short cut... this is at least much more solid than that.... if you are talking people not using small tricks here or there in order to fullfill so call "best practice"... I am sure it is hard to find in real life...

Jeekinz 06-14-2007 04:15 PM

Adding a "nailer" of 1 or 2x solid material would be a good "short cut". You just simply cannot screw/nail into the end or sides of plywood and think that joint will be stable.:no:

J187 06-14-2007 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 49060)
Hi Atlantic:

If you angle the screw slightly, will the edge of the head of the screw not stick out, and if you put it in more, would it not break the paper of the drywall?

I have not tried hanging sheetrock yet, but I am just curious.

(I suspect, I will be ruining some drywall edges soon. :laughing: )


No, but the keyword is slight. You can't "toenail" a screw in there sideways, but just a slight, gradual angle can help with studs that are less than perfect. I WOULD say, just make sure that the side of the screw head doesn't stick up, but the angle would be so slight you wouldn't hardly have to adjust the depth of the screw.

Honestly, having seen the work you've done in your basement, I doubt that your drywall edges are in any danger. I have a feeling you'll do pretty good with this part. It may take you a while though.... :) ..... but if you're still not in any big hurry, I think you'll hanging will come out quite well.

KUIPORNG 06-14-2007 04:22 PM

Not talking about the details here...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeekinz (Post 49104)
Adding a "nailer" of 1 or 2x solid material would be a good "short cut". You just simply cannot screw/nail into the end or sides of plywood and think that joint will be stable.:no:


To be honest, I don't really remember the size of wood to attached... but it all depends... sometimes even some scrap 2x4... but just talking about the concept here... it is as solid as a real stud., and as solid as how the installer want it to be... consider the drywall is not only supportted at the end but all over... so I don't see any issue here... I suspect you do have any experience installing drywall... to be honest...

may be you are talking about installing the drywall vertically which is different from the norm...

KUIPORNG 06-14-2007 04:26 PM

slight... means no angle ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by J187 (Post 49105)
No, but the keyword is slight. .


knowing that even you try to make the screw straight in...it isn't going to be straight.... if you try to make it slight angle... it is going to be too angled....


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:47 AM.