Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-24-2011, 02:43 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1
Share |
Default

Drainage


My house is at the base of a hill and when we have heavy rain I have water in my basement How can I correct this?

Ann Kilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2011, 04:36 AM   #2
Disabled wood vet
 
titanoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: California
Posts: 1,646
Default

Drainage


French drain.

Sent from a Samsung Galaxy S2

titanoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2011, 06:41 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: pa
Posts: 4,256
Default

Drainage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann Kilby View Post
My house is at the base of a hill and when we have heavy rain I have water in my basement How can I correct this?
as mentioned install a french drain system to remove water away from house....
ben's plumbing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2011, 07:22 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PENNSYLVANIA
Posts: 2,219
Default

Drainage


You have to dig a trench across the length of the house and install a drain trench then just past the house on both sides you have to continue the drain the water away from both sides of the hose. That way the water don't have a chance to even get at your house it is drained away from it.
COLDIRON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2011, 08:45 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: zentral Iowa
Posts: 1,155
Default

Drainage


Don't you know a boy scout always digs a trench around his tent and lets it drain away to the low point?
cleveman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 06:49 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PENNSYLVANIA
Posts: 2,219
Default

Drainage


@cleveman the OP name is Ann maybe never a boy scout.
COLDIRON is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to COLDIRON For This Useful Post:
ben's plumbing (12-25-2011)
Old 12-25-2011, 10:22 AM   #7
Facilities Maintenance
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sedro-Woolley WA
Posts: 280
Default

Drainage


To be more detailed on the trench...

take an Excavator (or a few shovels) dig a 3ft deep (in middle) hole. Then extend that hole across your home, 10 feet on either side. At the end of those ten feet, gradually increase the depth to 3 1/2ft deep. At both ends, make a 5ft x 5ft x 5ft box essentially (do not jump into this unless the sides are reinforced to protect from cave in, it's why I'd rather you use an excavator, because this is not really a very good job for a HO to do safety wise) fill each box with gravel, approx 4ft worth. fill the trench with gravel approx 2 1/2 to 3'' deep. Then put sand 3 inch layer on top. then put top soil etc. on top fo that until its flush with your landscape That should take care of a lot of water.

For best results, take a pourous drainage pipe (top pourous, bottom solid, you can find them anywhere, can't remember what they are called though, because I've only used them a few times, they have little holes on top and the bottoms are solid. and they have screen meshes on them to keep big chunks out) and put it into the trench connecting to the ends of each hole you made. These will carry the water downstream into both of the 5x5x5 holes, which the closest sides of them should be 10ft minimum from the closest point on your house. If you want to go a cheaper route, line the trench with plastic from edge to edge, it will have the same effect thanks to the sand and gravel, water can freely go through the gravel, hit the plasting, and follow gravity from there.

Also, now for the basement itself!

Look for cracks in the cement. Any cracks? Cool, take cement and get it in as deep as you can, wipe it flush with the wall. Awesome!

Getting through your drywall? Take the drywall out, remove insulation, reinforce that wall, replace insulation and redrywall. Also make sure to caulk before putting new insulation and drywall in place.

That should take care of a lot of that flooding.

It also wouldn't hurt to make 3 more trenches, and two more 5x5x5 boxes around your house in the same manner. to have 360 degree drainage.

You can plant grass seed over your lair of top soil. Just gotta find a place to dump your excavated soil.

Last edited by BigGuy01; 12-25-2011 at 10:25 AM.
BigGuy01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 11:44 AM   #8
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,139
Default

Drainage


It is tempting, though unwise, to offer detailed design on a site you have never seen, and have limited information on. Before designing a solution to the problem, you first have to establish the cause of the problem, and develop the solution later. In your case, it is necessary to determine if you have a surface water problem (water runs down the hill ON TOP of the ground or in a shallow swale), or a groundwater problem (water flows through the ground and into your basement).

You determine this by visual observation during rainstorm, and by installation of a few standpipe (typically PVC pipe inserted into a hole in the ground, usually at least five feet below grade). You measure the elevation of the water in the standpipe, which will be a good indication of the groundwater level.

If you have a surface water problem, you can address that by proper grading to direct the water around the house. If you have a groundwater problem, you are going to need a more expensive solution, probably a perimeter drain system. The exact design of the system will depend on the amount of groundwater you need to collect, where you want to direct the groundwater, and the groundwater elevation. Without detailed knowledge of these factors, speculating on solutions, though amusing, is not likely to lead to the best alternative.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 01:36 PM   #9
Facilities Maintenance
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sedro-Woolley WA
Posts: 280
Default

Drainage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
It is tempting, though unwise, to offer detailed design on a site you have never seen, and have limited information on. Before designing a solution to the problem, you first have to establish the cause of the problem, and develop the solution later. In your case, it is necessary to determine if you have a surface water problem (water runs down the hill ON TOP of the ground or in a shallow swale), or a groundwater problem (water flows through the ground and into your basement).

You determine this by visual observation during rainstorm, and by installation of a few standpipe (typically PVC pipe inserted into a hole in the ground, usually at least five feet below grade). You measure the elevation of the water in the standpipe, which will be a good indication of the groundwater level.

If you have a surface water problem, you can address that by proper grading to direct the water around the house. If you have a groundwater problem, you are going to need a more expensive solution, probably a perimeter drain system. The exact design of the system will depend on the amount of groundwater you need to collect, where you want to direct the groundwater, and the groundwater elevation. Without detailed knowledge of these factors, speculating on solutions, though amusing, is not likely to lead to the best alternative.
I just know that in my experience, making a slope from the house down, and into a deeper ditch, then lined with plasting, (including the ditch) and then making the trench into boxes away from the home, usually directs rain and ground water into the underground gravel pits away from the home.

I've seen this same solution about 7 times so far. Three times for ground water, which after digging the slope they mix a bunch of sand into the dirt, then put the plastic over, then gravel then sand then top soil. And for rain water.

And then once dried or semi-dried, cement any cracks in the basement. Which overall, water would not be getting into the basement unless there were cracks or holes letting the water in. Meaning structurally regardless, the basement has repairs that need to be made. Unless the OPs water piping is broken and they don't realize it yet.

But I digress.
BigGuy01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 09:38 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 116
Default

Drainage


Ann,

Mr. Holzman is correct that detailed information on your property is necessary to design an appropriate solution to your problem. Every site is different and there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all when it comes to drainage issues. The suggestions for a french drain or subsurface piping is typical of the very bad advice often seen on the internet.
pls8xx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 10:36 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,862
Default

Drainage


All of these trenches and ditches filled with gravel and/or containing a perforated pipe, and carrying water away from your house, are examples of French drains.

If you dug the ditch 3 feet down and the basement floor is 6 feet down and you drained away enough water so the basement doesn't flood any more then you are okay, at least for the time being. But usually they recommend having the gravel filled ditch below the basement floor level. A trench that worked for several years could overload in a rainstorm bigger than what you are used to.

Surface water that soaks into the ground, or ground water, above the level of the gravel filled trench, can be captured in the trench and carried away. But water that is below the trench or soaks below the trench will stay behind. If the trench is not below basement floor level, such water still has the potential for seeping into your basement.
__________________
Stop wasting time re-adjusting the pattern. Have several lawn sprinklers, one for each pattern.

Last edited by AllanJ; 12-25-2011 at 10:42 PM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2011, 11:43 PM   #12
Facilities Maintenance
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sedro-Woolley WA
Posts: 280
Default

Drainage


Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
All of these trenches and ditches filled with gravel and/or containing a perforated pipe, and carrying water away from your house, are examples of French drains.

If you dug the ditch 3 feet down and the basement floor is 6 feet down and you drained away enough water so the basement doesn't flood any more then you are okay, at least for the time being. But usually they recommend having the gravel filled ditch below the basement floor level. A trench that worked for several years could overload in a rainstorm bigger than what you are used to.

Surface water that soaks into the ground, or ground water, above the level of the gravel filled trench, can be captured in the trench and carried away. But water that is below the trench or soaks below the trench will stay behind. If the trench is not below basement floor level, such water still has the potential for seeping into your basement.
Never knew that term for it.

And good points.
BigGuy01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2011, 10:26 AM   #13
Rav
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 227
Default

Drainage


Hi, Ann. First, I completely agree with some others who have said that each situation is different and something that has worked in one situation may not be the best in another. So I would suggest an assessment of the situation by a professional drainage engineer. But just FYI in OUR case: Just in the last month, we had a similar situation rectified. Our driveway goes downhill, terminating in a wider area just in front of our garage. In front of the garage was a concrete pad. Especially during heavy rains water would build up and just sit on the pad, and once it was high enough it would back up into our garage. We had an engineering company come out to analyze it and determine the best way to deal with it. They determined that the pad was sloped all wrong (and not poured correctly; it was disintegrating), and had nowhere to drain. They demolished the old pad, poured a new one and installed a channel drain in it. They found a place about 50 feet away where an underground drainage pipe was low enough that it was lower than the pad, so water would flow down to it. They dug a trench and laid plastic pipe from the pad to the drainage pipe, and tied it in there. They also tied a downspout next to the garage into that same drainage pipe. They sloped the pad slightly so that water runs towards the channel drain (sort of a slight V shape, with the drain at the bottom of the V). In the last month we have had two moderately heavy rains (1/2 to 1"), and it's working perfectly. No water building up, no water in the garage. So my suggestion would be to have a professional drainage engineering company do an assessment (ours charged $150 for that, and applied that to the final price) and see what they say. There is no way we could have done that work ourselves.

Rav is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Foundation Drainage bhry Building & Construction 3 09-23-2010 10:08 AM
Pool Surround Drainage Questions Ynot General DIY Discussions 3 06-07-2010 03:53 PM
The IPGC Drainage Pipe agster97 Landscaping & Lawn Care 0 07-09-2009 12:05 AM
Drainage Tile and Retaining Wall nabz Landscaping & Lawn Care 3 05-25-2009 01:22 PM
Adding drainage to existing retaining wall? pcballgame Landscaping & Lawn Care 5 04-14-2009 03:29 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.