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Old 04-13-2012, 11:17 AM   #16
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double top plate and LVL


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Believe me, if I had auto mechanic friends, I wouldn't bring my car to a shop either.

It sounds to me like you're thinking this through fairly well and not winging it. I predict you'll be quite successful with this project.
thanks for the encouragement. yes, lots of late nights researching, planning, etc!

beam sizing was a little funky as well (but no problem for the sizing software). hard to tell from the photos but the joists above the doorway are continuous spans (16" OC), joists further to the left are simple spans (16" OC) and the joists on the far left are also simple spans but 12" OC. certainly not the type of arrangement that is outlined in a basic load table.

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Old 04-13-2012, 11:26 AM   #17
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beam sizing was a little funky as well (but no problem for the sizing software). hard to tell from the photos but the joists above the doorway are continuous spans (16" OC), joists further to the left are simple spans (16" OC) and the joists on the far left are also simple spans but 12" OC. certainly not the type of arrangement that is outlined in a basic load table.
No kidding. In a situation like that I would assume a consistent layout, and use the weakest of the configurations. I.e., I would ignore the 12" OC joists and assume they're all 16". If for some crazy reason there are 2x8 joists in part of the floor but 2x10s elsewhere, I'd assume they're all 2x8. I rather simplify and over-engineer in some places than sweat out the variations.
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Old 04-13-2012, 11:33 AM   #18
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No kidding. In a situation like that I would assume a consistent layout, and use the weakest of the configurations. I.e., I would ignore the 12" OC joists and assume they're all 16". If for some crazy reason there are 2x8 joists in part of the floor but 2x10s elsewhere, I'd assume they're all 2x8. I rather simplify and over-engineer in some places than sweat out the variations.
all joists are 12" deep wooden i-joists. the 12" OC joists are due to the span length. there is a bumpout on the opposite wall (the one behind me in the photo) which takes the span from 16' to 20'. looks like the builder was able to get by with 16" OC on the 16' spans but needed 12" OC on the 20' spans to maintain the same elevation on the bottom of the joists. much better than going to deeper joists and breaking the ceiling line.
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Old 04-13-2012, 11:42 AM   #19
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all joists are 12" deep wooden i-joists. the 12" OC joists are due to the span length. there is a bumpout on the opposite wall (the one behind me in the photo) which takes the span from 16' to 20'. looks like the builder was able to get by with 16" OC on the 16' spans but needed 12" OC on the 20' spans to maintain the same elevation on the bottom of the joists. much better than going to deeper joists and breaking the ceiling line.
Absolutely. That's what's nice about designing a floor for 16"OC joists. You can bump it up to 12" (or "to 11", as Nigel Tufnel would say) as needed--a span that is an even multiple of the all-so-important 48" and which is also, thankfully, covered by the span tables.
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Old 04-13-2012, 11:48 AM   #20
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Absolutely. That's what's nice about designing a floor for 16"OC joists. You can bump it up to 12" (or "to 11", as Nigel Tufnel would say) as needed--a span that is an even multiple of the all-so-important 48" and which is also, thankfully, covered by the span tables.
builder laid out the basement with the idea that someone may want to finish it one day. there is not a single pipe, duct, cable run, framing member, support post/beam, etc. below the joists or on the walls on the side i am looking to finish (where i took the photo). other side of the wall is a utility room which has everything. very nice.

in our old house, joists were 19.2" OC. finally figured out what those goofy diamonds were on the tape measure that didn't seem to line up with anything.
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Old 04-13-2012, 04:06 PM   #21
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double top plate and LVL


from what i can see from that photo the rough opening for the door is already framed wrong.. there is a double top plate.. then a filler peice of 2x under teh top plate which is in turn on top of the lvl then yet again a doubled lintil

the lvl should be directly under the double top plate first off to elminate as much chance of shrinking and crush under the load of the above floor system and any bearing walls on top of that

if you take out the double top plate though its still going to be extremely strong.. 2x material on its flat isnt as resistant to being crushed like it is on end or to a engineered beam
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Old 04-13-2012, 04:44 PM   #22
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from what i can see from that photo the rough opening for the door is already framed wrong.. there is a double top plate.. then a filler peice of 2x under teh top plate which is in turn on top of the lvl then yet again a doubled lintil

the lvl should be directly under the double top plate first off to elminate as much chance of shrinking and crush under the load of the above floor system and any bearing walls on top of that

if you take out the double top plate though its still going to be extremely strong.. 2x material on its flat isnt as resistant to being crushed like it is on end or to a engineered beam
the photo is the existing installation and what it looked like when i moved in. the door header is standard 2x10 lumber. it would get yanked out as part of the lvl beam install. beam will be 14' long and replace the existing door header and most of the staircase wall.

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