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ajoantmug 03-22-2007 09:02 PM

dormer
 
OK, so I have to have a 12 foot dormer built to finish my attic and I have no idea how much it should cost. If it is stick built and finished on the outside with a couple of standard windows what is a reasonable price range?

AtlanticWBConst. 03-22-2007 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajoantmug (Post 37984)
OK, so I have to have a 12 foot dormer built to finish my attic and I have no idea how much it should cost. If it is stick built and finished on the outside with a couple of standard windows what is a reasonable price range?


What area of the country are you in? (Affects labor charges)

ajoantmug 03-22-2007 09:38 PM

I live in Richmond, VA

AtlanticWBConst. 03-23-2007 06:01 AM

Labor only or ..... materials and labor?

ajoantmug 03-23-2007 06:20 AM

labor and materials, completely finished exterior with vinyl siding

AtlanticWBConst. 03-23-2007 06:40 AM

How many stories up is it?

ajoantmug 03-23-2007 06:58 AM

it's on the 2nd floor

AtlanticWBConst. 03-23-2007 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajoantmug (Post 38041)
it's on the 2nd floor

Your area....
Sounds like maybe a shed dormer then?

That depends on the contractor. You see, if you hire a guy who is a subcontracting framer, you will pay less (less overhead)

If you hire a GC or a small company, you will pay more (more overhead)


I am in NH, so I am only 'guestimating' for the rates in your area:

FRAMER: $3000.00 - $4000.00 range?
GC: $4000.00 - $6000.00 range?

+ permit fee.

maybe?

Brik 03-23-2007 12:21 PM

A bit dated info but here goes.

Philadelphia suburb, 1998. two 6' wide gable dormers and one 40' wide shed dormer. Second floor. Anderson windows, Western red cedar, select A, wood siding. Holes cut in 12/12 pitch roof, framing, siding windows, roofing, exterior trim to match rest of house. no exterior painting, no interior finishing, no electrical, insulation, drywall, etc. Roof on shed dormer was a torch down modified bitumen due to low slope. Shingles on gable dormers to match existing. Copper valley flashing.

$15,000, nine days start to finish. Not lowest bid. Lowest bid was $12K IIRC but two months start to finish. I would rate the quality of the job A+. Done by a home remodeling general contractor. Hope this helps somewhat.

ajoantmug 03-23-2007 03:15 PM

Wow, Sounds like the quote I got last night of 16 - 18,000 was insane. I should be hearing back from another smaller company very soon. Let's hope it isn't out of this world rediculous, as the first quote would price us out of the renovation at this point.

Brik 03-23-2007 03:43 PM

Maybe, maybe not. Get three quotes and make sure you are comparing apples to apples. Lowest price is not always the best deal (sometimes it is). Check references. Shake the guys hand. Does he have a firm grip? Says a lot. Does he show a passion for the job or is he there begrudgingly? Do you and the contractor communicate well? Do you hit it off? Do you feel like you are seeing eye to eye? Many of the soft factors are important too in my opinion.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-24-2007 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajoantmug (Post 38113)
Wow, Sounds like the quote I got last night of 16 - 18,000 was insane. I should be hearing back from another smaller company very soon. Let's hope it isn't out of this world rediculous, as the first quote would price us out of the renovation at this point.

To Clarify:

The estimates, I mentioned, were 'best case' scenerios (In and out easy work) of inital expenses. I was assuming that you were in the planning stages of estimating your financial expenses. I had left out the possible material costs, that can easily go $2K and way up.... (I had forgotten that you said that you wanted materials included in the costs)
I re-thought this and realized that the costs should really be higher, especially with a span of 12'. Structurally, there is alot involved with adding that much space on a dormer. They may have to change 1/2 the framing in your existing roof structures to properly install a dormer of that size. That could be the case...LVL's, etc..

Additional points:
I was assuming that labor rates are lower in your part of the country/state ... and I could be wrong.
There may be a whole day's worth of additional work ; setting up tools and staging, materials to the site, after project clean up, difficult roof alignment etc...

Bottom line: Please realize that no 'accurate' estimate can really be given 'sight unseen' or over the internet.
(We NEVER do any estimates without reviewing the project, the site, the logistics, the layout, the existing structure, design changes required, etc, etc....withour detailed calculations, price checks, etc.)

Example is with Brik's detailed roofing. I do not even know what your roofing is or what is required to properly tie-in what needs to be done.

Who's to say that if I were to go out to your home and see what the work will actually entail, and find alot of difficulties involved....I might give you a price of $18K or even $20K? +
These are points to consider, before assuming that you are getting 'ripped-off'.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-24-2007 10:12 AM

Additional Though
 
Additional Thought:

There is something else to consider when one is getting 'price quotes' or 'cost estimates'.

Brik mentioned the point about the 'lowest price or even a 'lower price'.
Please bear in mind that the 'lowest' or 'lower' price does not mean that the higher price is wrong.
Sometimes you can get: 'low-ball' estimates, 'inexperienced' lower estimates, or a 'blow-the-job-out-quick-and-get-paid' estimate.

What I mean is that a 'lower' or 'lowest' price may get you:

A desire by the contractor to do the job very quickly - resulting in your home and property being left a mess. A lack of skilled labor doing the job. A lack of proper experienced supervision on the work site. A lack of professional communication and care with the Home Owner during the project. Short cuts being taken because, not all expenses on the project had been thoroughly accounted for in the original estimate (Cheaper materials used or skipped all together), Construction debris piled up in your yard (because it's removal was not included). Expensive 'extra charges' for any details or additional requests made by the home owner. A general lack of professionalism to the Home Owner and consideration for their property.
No return calls from the contractor if there is a problem, after the job has been paid for. etc..etc..


For a price that is 'more than' the 'lower' or 'lowest' price, what you may get is:

A desire by the contractor to do the job very thoroughly and efficiently - resulting in your home and property being left tidy and clean on a daily basis. Highly skilled labor doing the job. Proper experienced supervision on the work site. Regular updating and professional communication and care with the Home Owner during the entire project. Short cuts NEVER being taken because, all expenses on the project had been thoroughly accounted for with allowances when the original estimate was given. Construction debris removed and disposed of properly (because it's removal and those expenses were included).
Details done on the job without these being requested. Additional small work being 'thrown in' at no extra charge. Complete professionalism and consideration for the home owner and their property.
Quick return calls from the contractor if there is a problem, after the job has been paid for. (etc..etc...)

I am not saying that this will always be the case, but these are never the less, points (That we have seen frequently in the field)... for property owners to seriously ponder.


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