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Old 02-08-2012, 05:25 AM   #16
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Does my new home have structural issues?


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
The average inspector is not going to be able to tell you if those posts meet code, because that is a detailed structural issue way beyond what an inspector is going to look at. They may be fine, but the only way to know for sure if they meet code is to contact the manufacturer to verify that the specific post

Very True.
Alternately, you could go to the building dept. at the local Town Hall. Somebody there passed it with an occupancy permit in the first place. Bring your picture.

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Old 02-08-2012, 06:55 AM   #17
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Does my new home have structural issues?


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Originally Posted by johanson21 View Post
If your looking to buy this house then you need to hire your own home inspector not just guessing and asking questions on the net to people that have never set foot on the property.
Best money you ever spent if he does his job right. Gives you a heads up on what wrong before you buy.

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He is hiring a home inspector, but the point is that his issue is beyond the scope of a regular home inspector
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Old 02-08-2012, 07:51 AM   #18
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Does my new home have structural issues?


Personally I think the weld looks a little sloppy, but it's not anything that would concern me in and of itself... It'd prompt me to look a little closer at workmanship.

Maybe I'm too picky and I'm judging it based on automotive body work welding and seeing a quality standard based on people that have a lot more hours welding than what you probably do if you're building houses, but the welds look uneven, the carbon suggests they mig welded with flux wire which really produces an inferior weld to an mig weld using a shielding gas, be that argon, CO2 or a Ar-CO2 mix... But it's not a load-bearing weld, it's just there to keep the plate from slipping out of position. I'd have at least expected it to be cleaned up with a wire brush and sprayed with Krylon to prevent rusting and just plain bad cosmetic appearance.

And again, I know that's probably being picky, and if it's the worst concern then there's probably nothing to be concerned about.
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:02 AM   #19
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Does my new home have structural issues?


Interesting view on the lolly columns. I have never met these so called temporary posts you speak of.

I heard that once on TOH and am still looking for the temporary posts. I think that that might just be a Mass. thing.

As far as not meeting codes, they meet our codes except they are upside down. I had a contractor tell me one time he had to get a welder to weld the movable screw to get the inspector to buy the job.

The reason they are at different heights is the builder did not make the footers for the columns at the same height. All looks good other than the upside down posts.

Last edited by framer52; 02-08-2012 at 08:03 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:08 AM   #20
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Actually... I've done some searching on that topic, and as far as I can tell all the temporary rated lally columns are the ones where there are two tubes that can be telescoped to different heights and held with 2 pins. The screw adjustment does not infer temporary.
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:07 AM   #21
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Does my new home have structural issues?


Check out this link for a good discussion on temporary lally columns.
http://www.octoberhome.com/articles/...ustcolumn.html

Note carefully that the article states that telescoping columns (the sectional ones with pins) are not rated for permanent use in the United States. I am assuming this statement is correct, I really do not know if there are any sectional lally columns that have been tested for permanent use. Curiously, I have two of them in my basement, they have been there since 1959 without apparent incident.

Note also that the article specifically addresses the issue of how a screw jack type lally column (like the one in the OPS post) must be evaluated to determine if it is rated for permanent support. It is NOT SUFFICIENT according to this article to simply install the post with the screw jack down, or to weld the threads, or otherwise cause the threads to be inoperable. The article claims that there are specific organizations that test lally columns for use as long term supports, and that without the appropriate certification, the columns cannot be considered suitable. I doubt the average inspector is aware of this minute detail. Frankly I was unaware that there were specific testing organizations that certified screw jack type lally columns. Certainly I do not recall ever seeing a lally column with a rating label on it. Most of the columns I have seen are steel tube cut to the appropriate height, installed with a welded plate on top and on the bottom. No threads, no pins. Certainly those are acceptable, but obviously there are pin types and thread types, whose acceptability seems to be much harder to determine.
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:30 AM   #22
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As an example, Tiger Brand has their ICC report on their website and must update anually:
http://www.tigerbrandjackpost.com/Ti...20-%202011.pdf
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:51 AM   #23
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Does my new home have structural issues?


So I guess that the 1000+ homes I have framed in Syracuse NY will fail as these "temporary" posts were and are still being used.

The article seemed to be short on specifics....
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Old 02-20-2012, 06:40 PM   #24
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Does my new home have structural issues?


I know of hundreds, if not thousands of homes with adjustable columns supporting them, however, the threaded ends are down and they are poured in concrete. The concrete is poured on top of the appropriate footing, which supports the post.
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Old 02-20-2012, 08:02 PM   #25
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Does my new home have structural issues?


Sometimes those lally columns have inadequate footings underneath them. Hopefully that's not the case.

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