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-   -   Does my new home have structural issues? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/does-my-new-home-have-structural-issues-132952/)

thefonz222 02-07-2012 08:23 PM

Does my new home have structural issues?
 
First of all HI! Never thought I would be in a DUI forum but I was about to buy a house until I checked out the basement and saw these support beams.. First of all why do they look so cheap, are they hiding something, and I noticed they were cranked at different heights... Is this normal, or should I run for the hills?

Thanks in advance!

http://www.ananthan.com/1.JPG


http://www.ananthan.com/2.JPG

http://www.ananthan.com/4.JPG

titanoman 02-07-2012 08:27 PM

Everything looks good to me.
What cracks?

thefonz222 02-07-2012 08:31 PM

Just concerned about the support beams. I know nothing about construction but are they standard? Why is one raised higher than the other... Do you think this indicates an uneven floor plan??

thefonz222 02-07-2012 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by titanoman (Post 847238)
Everything looks good to me.
What cracks?


Cranked not cracked.

woodworkbykirk 02-07-2012 08:36 PM

these types of posts are adjustable. they get turned to changed the height which will make a beam level. the reason they are at different heights is probably do to the strip footings being at slightly different elevations, this is nothing unusual and nothing to worry about

where its a steel beam the plates on the posts have clearly been welded to the beam so they dont move. perfectly fine. if it were a wood beam either conventional lumber or engineerd there would be a laminated 2x6 post of a 6x6 post cut to fit where the beam would be level

you should be all good.. the only thing that should be addresses is why the exterior walls aren't drywalled. locally its a requirement to get a occupancy permit. either drywall hasnt started yet or it was ommitted in the basement.

thefonz222 02-07-2012 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodworkbykirk (Post 847250)
these types of posts are adjustable. they get turned to changed the height which will make a beam level. the reason they are at different heights is probably do to the strip footings being at slightly different elevations, this is nothing unusual and nothing to worry about

where its a steel beam the plates on the posts have clearly been welded to the beam so they dont move. perfectly fine. if it were a wood beam either conventional lumber or engineerd there would be a laminated 2x6 post of a 6x6 post cut to fit where the beam would be level

you should be all good.. the only thing that should be addresses is why the exterior walls aren't drywalled. locally its a requirement to get a occupancy permit. either drywall hasnt started yet or it was ommitted in the basement.

Appreciate the feedback. I can rest a little easier.

oh'mike 02-07-2012 08:41 PM

That drywall is a local code thing---would not be a problem here---

Jay 78 02-07-2012 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thefonz222 (Post 847231)
Never thought I would be in a DUI forum

DUI forums are no good. The 'traffic' is too erratic. :laughing:

conspikuous 02-07-2012 08:53 PM

I wish my house sat on big steel beams like that lol. Looks buff

Jilligoat 02-07-2012 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jay 78 (Post 847265)
DUI forums are no good. The 'traffic' is too erratic. :laughing:

Had to read this twice.. HILARIOUS!!! :laughing:

Hardway 02-07-2012 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jay 78 (Post 847265)
DUI forums are no good. The 'traffic' is too erratic. :laughing:

Beat me too it, DUI. Drunk driving:thumbup:

loneframer 02-07-2012 09:00 PM

Those screw jacks would fail in my area. The adjustable portion has to be buried in concrete to render them permanently set with no adjustment possible.

joecaption 02-07-2012 09:14 PM

If your looking to buy this house then you need to hire your own home inspector not just guessing and asking questions on the net to people that have never set foot on the property.
Best money you ever spent if he does his job right. Gives you a heads up on what wrong before you buy.

thefonz222 02-07-2012 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 847287)
If your looking to buy this house then you need to hire your own home inspector not just guessing and asking questions on the net to people that have never set foot on the property.
Best money you ever spent if he does his job right. Gives you a heads up on what wrong before you buy.


Inspection is in 2 days time. I just can't wait that long.. I need to know now if it's even worth getting an inspector if the situation is really bad or not.. Just sending out the feelers.

Daniel Holzman 02-07-2012 09:53 PM

The average inspector is not going to be able to tell you if those posts meet code, because that is a detailed structural issue way beyond what an inspector is going to look at. They may be fine, but the only way to know for sure if they meet code is to contact the manufacturer to verify that the specific post (they are called lally columns by the way) is rated for permanent use with the screw jack extended. Surprisingly, a lot of lally columns with screw jacks are actually intended for temporary support. Many "temporary rated" lally columns have been in permanent use for years, often with no problem, but they typically do not meet code. Maybe not an issue to you, but at least worth checking out.


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