Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-19-2012, 06:09 PM   #1
HME
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Do I need to add a post?


I'm wondering with the weight of tounge and groove pine ceiling to be added and a metal roof do I need to add a post under the middle joist? Its Ceder Post, Beam and Joist. That Beam scares me. Sorry if this is posted in the wrong place. David
Attached Thumbnails
Do I need to add a post?-img_0944.jpg   Do I need to add a post?-img_0948.jpg   Do I need to add a post?-img_0943.jpg   Do I need to add a post?-img_0945.jpg  

HME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2012, 06:19 PM   #2
HME
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Do I need to add a post?


I forgot to add that the distance between the post now is 12'8".

HME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2012, 06:55 PM   #3
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,254
Rewards Points: 2,086
Default

Do I need to add a post?


Unless my eyes are growing old, you appear to have trusses, not joists. And those look like manufactured, not home made, trusses. All manufactured trusses are rated for a specific load, if you do in fact have manufactured trusses, you should check with the manufacturer on what their load rating is, my guess is these will be fine. Or do I misunderstand your question?
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2012, 07:24 PM   #4
HME
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Do I need to add a post?


Daniel thanks for your reply. You are correct they are trusses. I am not worried about the trusses at all. I built them peice by peice in place. I am concerned about the span between the knee braces- I think thats what there called. I whittled them out with my chain saw. Started those with an 8x8 cedar post. There is about a 7' span between the knee braces that concerns me. I have never worked with the cedar post before. They were so light. I was able to put the 6x6 20' long up on top myself. Makes me wonder how strong it can be?
HME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 09:25 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Southeastern US
Posts: 222
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Do I need to add a post?


HME,

All points look good to me. On a structure like yours, so long as all the corners are "tied in", the structure will stay standing (i.e. if the structure doesn't rock left, right, back, and forward).

Great job!
oodssoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2012, 02:35 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 246
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Do I need to add a post?


Hope you don't mind me asking David but why did you double up on the rafters?

puttster
puttster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2012, 10:23 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 713
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Do I need to add a post?


If it's the beam running across the tops of the posts, directly under the truss-ends, then imo you don't have anything to worry about.
In terms of the overall 'feel' of the structure, the proportions of the timber members look OK. Remember that the beam is continuous over the posts, and the trusses resting on the ends will tend to counter any stress/deflection in the middle.
What you need to watch is overall stability, as another poster has advised.
However, if the posts are well secured at the base, you should have no problem
Nice job; trusses are probably over-designed, but far better that than the other way.
tony.g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 02:37 PM   #8
HME
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Do I need to add a post?


Thanks for all the replys. Puttster- I was copying a picture I saw on the internet and it was cheaper to double 2x8s vs buying 4x6s. I just liked the look of the thicker board. What first got me wondering if I needed to add a post is - after the joist were up and before I added the knee braces I climbed on top of the beam in the middle and jumped up and down. It felt like a rubber band but it actually only deflected 1/8". I measured from ground while jumping- with help of course. After knee braces were added- NO deflection, but thats what made me question. I am 6'3' 290#. I thought about skipping the tounge and groove pine and just put a metal roof on- but I think that would be too loud to enjoy.
HME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2013, 07:39 PM   #9
HME
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Do I need to add a post?


Ok new question- same project. Yes- I work slow. I am going to add plywood on top of the tongue and groove plywood and under the metal roof. Should I put 30# felt between the two?-Definently between the metal and wood- but what about between the two wood layers? I am thinking so. On the Muellar website where I am buying the metal roof it does not show any membrane. I have to add the plywood due to the one inch screws. Muellar's doesn't have any shorter. The tongue and groove- v-groove boards are only 3/4 thick. Thanks

HME is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reuse Concrete Fence Post Pier & Fence Post Extraction JasonCA Landscaping & Lawn Care 2 03-24-2012 08:58 PM
New posts and beams in crawlspace, post out of line WillK Building & Construction 1 02-26-2012 09:56 AM
Tiling vertical post kellyharris15 Flooring 12 02-22-2011 03:28 PM
Deck Post Height for Composite Post Railing ylwdog Building & Construction 5 11-15-2010 09:01 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.