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Old 08-02-2010, 12:19 PM   #1
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Do I have a structural problem here?


I'm attempting to install a sliding glass door in an exterior brick wall but have some concerns with the construction process. I have heard that a door shouldn't be installed within 2-4 feet of a corner and was wondering if there is something that could be done to work around this and still maintain structural integrity.

As seen in the picture the wall is only partially sheeted and there is a diagonal strip running from the bottom right hand corner to the upper left hand corner.

It seems odd that the opposite corner has a door but I imagine the wall was assembled differently.

Can someone tell me if removing the studs and diagonal strip and replacing the area with a supported overhead 2 (2x6) would cause structural issues.

Thank you,

Eric

Do I have a structural problem here?-door-opening-compressed.jpg


Last edited by dongray; 08-02-2010 at 12:23 PM.
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:20 PM   #2
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Do I have a structural problem here?


It is hard to say if you have a structural problem without understanding the construction of the rest of that wall. The sheathing and diaganol are to prevent the wall from racking. Based upon what I see in your picture, however, I am guessing that the rest of your wall is not sheathed with OSB and that removing that structure would compromise its rigidity.

I would not do it, based solely on what I see in your picture. Not, at least, without further structural modifications.

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Old 08-02-2010, 03:12 PM   #3
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Do I have a structural problem here?


I dont believe there is osb further down the wall. Is there any other way to brace the wall and install the door? I could consider removing more brick from the right side and installing another panel of osb but that does get the support I need or is there a simpler way?
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:48 PM   #4
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Do I have a structural problem here?


Can someone tell me if removing the studs and diagonal strip and replacing the area with a supported overhead 2 (2x6) would cause structural issues.

Yes it could.

What’s sitting on top of that wall, the roof?

How about a picture from the outside.
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Old 08-02-2010, 06:27 PM   #5
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Do I have a structural problem here?


There are many details missing from the post.
Why is there one sheet of OSB? What's the rest of the wall made of?
How old is the house?
How many stories?
There was no mention of a lintel. How do you plan on installing it?
Is the entire house brick? It's very hard to open a 6 foot span and not have the bricks above shift or fall out.
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:11 PM   #6
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Do I have a structural problem here?


The "stand up" OSB is a structural shear panel and the let in brace provides lateral bracing as well. Many homes are built this way, generally having a "stand up" panel on all four corners, on both sides of the corner. Depending on the age of the house, the infil material could be fiber board or ridgid foam material.

I'd consult an engineer before compromising the shear panel, lateral bracing, ot the brick veneer.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:24 PM   #7
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Do I have a structural problem here?


Quote:
Is there any other way to brace the wall and install the door?
I believe that there is. I suspect that if you were to open up the wall adjacent to the other door you would find similar bracing and construction. Similarly, I assume that a shear panel next to the new door may be sufficient. Unfortunately, this probably means additional demolition in your future.

Watching the construction of houses around the area, I notice many who add the shear panels only on the corners. I guess they value the insulation value of foam and fiber board over the remaining structure. Personally, I would have rigid sheathing entirely.

Regardless of my own thoughts, I agree with the suggestions to consult with a structural engineer.
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Old 08-02-2010, 09:02 PM   #8
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Do I have a structural problem here?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
There are many details missing from the post.
Why is there one sheet of OSB? What's the rest of the wall made of?
How old is the house?
How many stories?
There was no mention of a lintel. How do you plan on installing it?
Is the entire house brick? It's very hard to open a 6 foot span and not have the bricks above shift or fall out.
Ron
Its a single storie brick house built in 1999. There should be no brick above the door once it is installed if there is a lintel will be needed as you stated.
I believe there is only one sheet of osb at each corner and the rest is a foam board.
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Old 08-02-2010, 11:40 PM   #9
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Do I have a structural problem here?


The old Code: Wall bracing: http://www.mcvicker.com/resguide/page009.htm

The new Code, Page #8 as per IRC table 602.10.3: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:BykbPl6yI3MJ:www.12wax.com/Garda%2520Heated%2520Drive%252093/Garda%2520Heated%2520Drive%252093-Pages/IBC(2006)SUMMARY.pdf+IRC+table+602.10.3&hl=en&gl=u s&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESg7brpyShHsa_W-oEf5YLqqM7TXJfq1D3zpsLxtBWWIEXDMOaPgySMzKBDQmAVJFz 5tVK-ImpdtaPrCPxo_1WwPKgwV54h_NxnNwTDTWr1jpRkJSS235ejV7 PaKE6xmg-x_8J4i&sig=AHIEtbRthASw0nn5VilQdAn8OOpgwr-K6w

Be safe, Gary

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