DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Differences between PVC trimboards??? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/differences-between-pvc-trimboards-10028/)

Clutchcargo 07-20-2007 04:45 PM

Differences between PVC trimboards???
 
Are there any real differences between the various manufacturers of PVC trim boards; Never Rot, Azek, Versatex? I've used the Royal Mouldings Never Rot product from HD and that machined just like wood. Are the densities of the trim boards pretty much the same from each of these manufacturers?

When I machined the Never Rot product it left somewhat of a porous edge, is there anything that should be done with that edge?

I bought another plastic product that I originally thought was PVC but this one melted to my table saw blade. I'm not sure what it was but it was difficult to work with, I returned after trying to cut a couple inches off it.

troubleseeker 07-20-2007 11:03 PM

I have only used the Azec products, which machine pretty cleanly, but it is my understanding that there is a wide range of smoothness among brands after machining, and that the very porous products take a lot of prep to get a decent paint job on the cut surfaces.

AtlanticWBConst. 07-21-2007 07:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clutchcargo (Post 53791)
Are there any real differences between the various manufacturers of PVC trim boards; Never Rot, Azek, Versatex? I've used the Royal Mouldings Never Rot product from HD and that machined just like wood. Are the densities of the trim boards pretty much the same from each of these manufacturers?



I have used: Koma, AZEK, Never Rot, and a few others. As stated by Trouble seeker, the only real difference I have noticed is the surface texture that the manufacture applies to it, in order to imitate natural wood grains.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clutchcargo (Post 53791)
When I machined the Never Rot product it left somewhat of a porous edge, is there anything that should be done with that edge?



No, What you should try to do (as with all cut lumber) - hide any milled edges where possible during installation. Another way to hide cut edges is to 45 degree cut peices and splice them together so that no cut edge is visible. Then use the manufacturer's ''composite-glue'' to seal the edges together.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clutchcargo (Post 53791)
I bought another plastic product that I originally thought was PVC but this one melted to my table saw blade. I'm not sure what it was but it was difficult to work with, I returned after trying to cut a couple inches off it.

Sounds like a different material composition. It's got more "styrofoam" (sp)materials mixed into it (light weight product).

AtlanticWBConst. 07-21-2007 07:21 AM

Clutch,

Did you see these installation instructions?:

http://www.azek.com/install.php?cate...n%20Guidelines

Clutchcargo 07-21-2007 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 53858)
No, What you should try to do (as with all cut lumber) - hide any milled edges where possible during installation. Another way to hide cut edges is to 45 degree cut peices and splice them together so that no cut edge is visible. Then use the manufacturer's ''composite-glue'' to seal the edges together.


The corner boards get assembled this way? My plan was to use pocket screws to assemble the corner boards and then install as one piece. Can I use pocket screws if I trim the edges at 45?

AtlanticWBConst. 07-21-2007 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clutchcargo (Post 53866)
[/font]
The corner boards get assembled this way? My plan was to use pocket screws to assemble the corner boards and then install as one piece. Can I use pocket screws if I trim the edges at 45?

I wouldn't because the edges will be brittle. Use the ''glue'' and finish nail gun with galvanized nails to tack it.

Las Vegas Lamar 11-14-2010 02:32 PM

The best thing about 45* miter
 
It is best to use a high quality blade T-80 (not using inside the line nor outside) When cutting with a White Eagle,Forrest or CMT blade,your Kerf is directly on the line.Thus,45 degrees miter is a true 45 degree miter.But please cut from the front peice (profile),Do not flip. Beed with a "life time caulking in the joint, I prefer to use it all the way around(due to extreme wealther conditions,such as 6hrs or more a day sun exposure year around).Wipe the joints clean,and after 3hrs. and repeat with the second beed of caulk. Life time materials with lifetime caulking,...yeah sounds good right?:thumbup::wink::thumbsup:

Las Vegas Lamar 11-14-2010 03:02 PM

Working with Pvc molding
 
The lower of the 3 PVC molding(never rot),if you are not going to paint the trim,it is best to use Nitrile gloves when handling this product.The Oil or dirt from your hand or any other type of glove can leave residue on it,causing you to have to paint it.I have tried alot of things,suck as using spar Varnish(Sheen or High Gloss),Helmsman by minwax, or other varnishes for marine plywood. This is only suggested if only for eaither two reasons,if you want the brick molding to have a finishing other than painting,or if you want to tone down the bright white look(to match the old white paint on your house. Varnish normally adds a light yellow color that is very not-so -noticible,but only by comparison.
:huh:


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:41 AM.