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Old 04-01-2013, 11:28 PM   #1
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


I am planning to frame an interior wall which runs parallel to the ceiling framing and therein, will not be load-bearing. The wall will have a pocket door and a series of three transom windows across the top of wall and above the door.

I have a few questions regarding the design of the framing for this wall as they may be dictated by typical building code:

1. The door width/slab will be 34" and thus the opening for the pocket door frame is approximately 69". Does this opening require a special header?

2. Is a header required over the entire opening above the window openings?

Thanks y'all!

Jimmy

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Old 04-01-2013, 11:39 PM   #2
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


Yes, you need a header to have the windows and the door. You cannot just stick either in place without something supporting their framing.

Pocket doors can be gorgeous or the work of the devil. You do have a level, plumb bob and square for this right?

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Old 04-02-2013, 12:21 AM   #3
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


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Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Yes, you need a header to have the windows and the door. You cannot just stick either in place without something supporting their framing.

Pocket doors can be gorgeous or the work of the devil. You do have a level, plumb bob and square for this right?
I have installed pocket doors in several past projects. I have levels, plumb bobs and squares. Thanks!
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Old 04-02-2013, 08:36 AM   #4
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


I always use a minimum of 2x6 header in non load bearing wall over top a pocket door, the weight of the door hangs off of the header so it does need to be able to hold weight and depending on how tall your ceilings are there could be weight from the remainder of the wall above the door too. headers help to hold the wall together around openings and lock everything in tight for the long haul, no drywall cracks etc.... so Yes.
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Old 04-02-2013, 11:52 AM   #5
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


I would say this depends on the final look you're going for. Is the transom meant to go flush to the ceiling? If so, then there is no space for a header. In that case you're essentially building a short / nonbearing wall with a transom feature on top. Nothing wrong w that.

Since the transom goes over the pocket door, I'd give the door opening enough strength to support the weight of the door... Can you fit a 4x6? You'll want some height here above the door but below the window to trim out the door anyways. Then the transom can sit on top of that, and then there isn't really anything needed above the transom. Your king studs go full height and top plate attaches to the ceiling... either to a joist directly (if it happens to work out) or to cross supports. The top plate could extend over the transom -- or not, if you're going flush.



Something like this?

Last edited by SquishyBall; 04-02-2013 at 12:16 PM.
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Old 04-02-2013, 01:12 PM   #6
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


The bottom plate is not shown in this otherwise nice sketch. All studs should sit on the bottom plate. We always called what you are calling jack studs Trimmers, but I think the terms are mutually acceptable, interchangeable.
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Old 04-02-2013, 01:36 PM   #7
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


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The bottom plate is not shown.
Yep, missed that... Fixed...
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Old 04-03-2013, 08:22 AM   #8
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Differences between bearing and non-load bearing wall framing


great sketch! a 2x6 header(two 2x6 with 1/2" plywood in between) will be straighter than a 4x6 and less likely to warp/bend/twist... and the top plates still need to extend along the very top of the wall, if not two then just one top plate at least to define the wall border...

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