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Old 09-27-2011, 12:49 PM   #1
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Detached garage drainage in winter


I'm planning on building a detached garage next year that will be heated without a floor drain. I currently have a 20x22 concrete pad that has grading built up very high all around it so I'm not concerned about water infiltration from the outside but I'm worried about the slop melting from the inside out.

If I build the garage on top of the pad I'm worried about the walls absorbing water as I want to insulate and drywall the garage. Are there materials I can use around the perimeter that can get wet?

My other option is to have someone come in and build a curb wall but this will definitely be the most costly since I'm working with a pad that is already in place.

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Old 09-27-2011, 01:49 PM   #2
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Detached garage drainage in winter


The slab should have a gentle slope to allow excess melt water to flow out the overhead door openings.

You can double plate the perimeter wall and hold the sheathing off the floor surface by one plate thickness (1-1/2"). Provide a capillery break beneath the plate and you should be fine.

If you have that much water that often, then you may consider making the whole garage out of masonry.

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Old 09-27-2011, 03:10 PM   #3
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Detached garage drainage in winter


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Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse View Post
The slab should have a gentle slope to allow excess melt water to flow out the overhead door openings.

You can double plate the perimeter wall and hold the sheathing off the floor surface by one plate thickness (1-1/2"). Provide a capillery break beneath the plate and you should be fine.

If you have that much water that often, then you may consider making the whole garage out of masonry.
The slab does have a gentle slop in this case. What would I do do create the break beneath the plate? This is my area of concern - water wicking into the bottom plate and working its way upward into the insulation, drywall, etc. Rubber gasket material?

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Old 09-27-2011, 03:33 PM   #4
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Detached garage drainage in winter


Why not just lay a course of 6" wide x 8 high x16" block around the perimeter, On top of it, set a 2x6 treated sill (with the necessary anchor bolts, of course) to hold the wood construction above in place. - You can also add a moisture barrier on top of the curb.

The big advantage is having an installed concrete curb that eliminates the nooks and crannies on the slab that collect "stuff". It also makes flushing with a hose, brushing and vacuuming if necessary much easier. - Also makes it easier to have a slightly higher garage door opening.

This is a result similar to using concrete block stem wall below from for stability and then pouring a floating 4" concrete slab inside the stem walls to get the desired drainage pattern for the floor.

Dick

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Old 09-27-2011, 04:01 PM   #5
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Detached garage drainage in winter


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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Why not just lay a course of 6" wide x 8 high x16" block around the perimeter, On top of it, set a 2x6 treated sill (with the necessary anchor bolts, of course) to hold the wood construction above in place. - You can also add a moisture barrier on top of the curb.

The big advantage is having an installed concrete curb that eliminates the nooks and crannies on the slab that collect "stuff". It also makes flushing with a hose, brushing and vacuuming if necessary much easier. - Also makes it easier to have a slightly higher garage door opening.

This is a result similar to using concrete block stem wall below from for stability and then pouring a floating 4" concrete slab inside the stem walls to get the desired drainage pattern for the floor.

Dick
Loving the ideas guys. This one might be probable but I would have to consider if the temperature variations here would affect this. Might also be doable as a DIY project and accomplish the same as a concrete curb for a fraction of the price. Maybe even parge the exterior of the blocks for that complete finished look?
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Old 09-27-2011, 05:25 PM   #6
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Detached garage drainage in winter


Whether the plate is on CMU or concrete a capillary break (foam sill seal) will be needed to prevent the wicking you mention. You don't need the cmu base course under normal "residential" type use, but if you want the ability to hose out like concrete said, at least 1 course of cmu or concrete it is highly recommended.

This is the sill seal: http://images.lowes.com/product/conv...43000388xl.jpg (this particular one is from Lowe's, but most every box store or supplier will have it)
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Old 09-27-2011, 09:44 PM   #7
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Detached garage drainage in winter


Ah I do remember that gasket from our last garage project in 2004.

If I chose not to have "one course of cmu or concrete" what options could I use on the walls to still accomplish wetability(made a new word)? I've heard of water resistant plywood, not sure if it would be a good application here. I'm not dead set on drywall inside the garage.

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