Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-23-2007, 04:21 PM   #1
They're all fixer-uppers
 
J187's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 991
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Desarmor - My second impression


Earlier I posted regarding my positive experience purchasing and hanging Densarmor for the first time. Recently, I had the chance to mudd it. Overall I would say Densarmor muds just about the same as every other GP Gypsum wall panel. It sands perhaps a little easier and quicker than standard drywall because the fiberglass facing is a lot more tollerant to sand paper than paper, so there is little chance of tearing or fraying the facing while sanding. The seems tape very nicely and the added durability and strength come in very handy in special areas that may require slightly less than ordinary drywalling practices - for instance in my application I was able to tape up to an existing textured ceiling without having to mud to the ceiling. I had done this once before in the house and it was much easier this time w/ the densarmor. Overall, this stuff has been great to work with. The added weight was noticeable when hanging and transporting but the subsequent strength and density is appreciated in the wall. The mold and moisture resistance, as well as better fire resistance is well worth it for areas of subtle moisture considering Densarmor is no more expensive than reg drywall.

My lone criticism is, the stuff is almost white. It makes it extremely difficult to see the compound on the wall even w/ a trouble light. Just a slight annoyance, other than that, I loved it.

J187 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2007, 09:42 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 107
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Desarmor - My second impression


J187--- I am at the point in my basement finishing project where I am trying to decide whether to use regular drywall or the Densarmor product. You seemed to have liked it, the quality, and the installation went well. Is there anything that would keep you from using it again? Are there any special considerations to take into account when deciding to use the Densarmor vs. regular drywall?

I priced it at HD and it was, like you said about 50 cents cheeper per sheet than the regular stuff. My square footage is roughly 1600 sq. ft. of wall and ceiling, so I figured I will need at least 50 sheets. Will this be a daunting task as far as getting it from HD (do they help load the stuff at the store?), and into my basement? I have to navigate around a few corners and down the steps since I only have an egress window to the outside from the basement and it is not big enough to allow 4x8' x 1/2" sheets through.

I am just trying to get som emore pointers from someone who has experience using the product. I will most likely be contracting some of the drywall to a friend who has lots of experience hanging and finishing. I will be helping him in the beginning as he shows me the "ropes" of drywall and then I will be taking over most of the work myself (mostly to save$$$).

Thanks for any advice!

DIY4EVER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2007, 05:07 PM   #3
They're all fixer-uppers
 
J187's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 991
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Desarmor - My second impression


Hey Diy, nothing would stop me from using Densarmour again. More so for its' strength than its mold resistance, but for mold resistance too absolutely. Especially in a basement area. 50 Sheets shouldn't be that big of a deal. I used 30 and got them at HD. I made two trips, 15 each time just because it was easier. The only big difference is, you may want to split the densarmour on the truck and carry it in one by one unless you've got some pretty strong help. Its not like carrying a two pack of regular drywall. But honestly, I found this stuff to be a little more forgiving for the diy/first timer than regular drywall and found really no detriments except the white blending thing, which I quickly got over and I intend to use a tinted primer to reveal imperfections as well. I say go for it. But just treat accordingly whereas it is heavier, extra help on ceilings, etc. Also, when you mudd, have a couple of very bright trouble lights handy. I used the 2 x tripod stand kind. Bright light really helps against the whiteness of the background.
J187 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.