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Old 02-05-2008, 11:34 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
As I understand it -

Your posts were not supported properly, as you stated in your original post. You then poured concrete over the entire thing and embedded part of the posts in the slab.
I'm sorry, I believe there is a misunderstanding. The original posts were supported properly. As they were set in footings with a Simpson bracket. It passed code and inspection.

A few months later, I had a slab poured OVER the existing area. Nothing else changed. I am just looking to bring the posts out of the concrete and set them above grade.


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Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Your slab provides no structural support for the posts since it is only 4" thick, the slab is above the concrete post supports and the posts are probably near the edge. All the concrete does is make water run off and make any repairs more difficult. The rebars into the foundation mean little to the deck support.

Live with what you have created and watch it. You might get lucky! - If you end up with heaving or settlent, be prepared to tear up everything up put in in proper concrete post supports with simpson brackets to keep the wood high and dry. Then you can address the details of how to support your deck during the reconstruction
I appreciate your answers but I just don't understand why you are stating that it is unstable? The original concrete footings are still holding the posts, the only difference now is that the posts have concrete around them, due to the slab being poured over them.


Last edited by JackOfAllTrades; 02-05-2008 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 02-05-2008, 12:59 PM   #17
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Are the posts treated? I was under the impression that treated posts could be embedded in concrete as long as no water could seep in and rot them. is this not true?
If it is true and if the issue is water getting in, could you not just build something around the bottom of the post to keep water away?
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Old 02-05-2008, 01:11 PM   #18
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You said the piers were only 12" deep... That does not meed code in Colorado. MIN 30" deep. If they are truly properly sized footings then you can cut out the old and install a new post base to atach the posts to.
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Old 02-05-2008, 01:36 PM   #19
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I should say that you should make cuts in the patio to isolate the deck piers around the posts. That way if the patio heaves it does not push the deck up.

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