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Old 11-28-2006, 01:59 PM   #1
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deck post question


hi
i am building decking can any one tell me what concrete mix i would need for the posts and to get a really good strong mix can you brake it down in example 1 part sand and so on i will be sinking the posts in the ground and i am not using pliers or met posts i will also be using a cement mixer .

thanks
for any help that any one can give

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Old 11-28-2006, 02:22 PM   #2
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deck post question


A little more information is needed -

Are you setting posts in the ground and surrounding them with concrete?

Are you pouring concrete in the ground that you want to set posts on?

If you are doing the first, you would be better off buying the premixed bags. You do not need high strength. This is usually the cheapest when you consider the cost of hauling/getting sand and the waste.

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Old 11-28-2006, 03:00 PM   #3
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deck post question


hi i will put a concrete footing in first i don't really know i deep this should be ? and then once they have set i will fill the holes up with concrete, i have both premix but due the volume being used i have to use both , i will but i will use the premix where the deck would need this most and the rest mix my own ,what i need to know is how to mix the rest using chippings sand and cement and the strongest way or any idea on the best approach to this and the best method ?

thanks for
the reply

alan
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Old 11-28-2006, 06:49 PM   #4
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deck post question


First of all if you dont know how deep they need to be... Do you even have a permit?? If not I would consider STOPPING till you get a permit lined up.

As far as concrete goes: I would recomend using a fiber reinforced mix from a home store like HD. Quikcrete makes it and it is about the strongest mix you can buy at HD. You could also buy a 5000 PSI mix from quikcrete as well. It is also a very strong mix.

I would not recomend trying to mix your own concrete mixes unless you know someone who can help you. As this can be a little tricky and if you dont mix it right your footings will fail and your deck could colapse.
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Old 11-28-2006, 07:13 PM   #5
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Agreed on the depth question. The only place to go and get information on the minimum depth is your local building official. This is always where to go when you have your drawings for your permit. There is nothing wrong with exceeding the code, since it is only the least you have to do and not necessarily what is best in the long run. Don't try to sell the house in the future wothout a permit or you could have a messy situation.

Do not waste your money on fiber reinforced concrete. You do not need it and it is easy to make a mistake with. All reputable fiber cement is made with the proper fibers. There are many types such as alkalai-resistant glass (the glass does not deteriorate with age), polypropelene, steel, etc. It is a good product, but you don't need it.

The best way to do your support is to auger or dig a hole to or deeper than the minimum depth. Insert a Sonotube (coated cylindrical cardboard form) - size will depend on whether you have 4x4 or 6x6 posts. Fill with 3000 psi concrete (normal strength) and then insert a galvanized steel attachment (Simpson?) that you attach your wood posts to. Brace the structure according to the design or it could collapse with a good load and a little wind or vibration. Avoid a ledger attached to the house unless you want to remove siding, use a PT ledger, bolt through the rim joist and install through bolts.

If you use tubes, you will end up using less concrete and have sufficient strength down below any frost. It is easy to estimate the amount of concrete so you can just get as many bags as you need and not have a pile of sand and extra bags of cement left.

Last edited by concretemasonry; 11-28-2006 at 07:18 PM.
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