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-   -   Deck Building Codes (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/deck-building-codes-164976/)

ashleyripka 11-28-2012 08:44 AM

Deck Building Codes
 
Hi. I am trying to get some information on general deck building codes across the country. The main issue I am searching for is how the decks are attached to the homes. I am aware that several years ago there wasn't really a set code on the proper type of fasteners and that decks recently have been failing because they have only been attached with nails. When did this really become frowned upon, and the codes set in to use lag bolts and screws? I don't need an exact date, just a general time frame.

I am also aware that there are codes that are set from county to county, but I figured that this would be an issue that's the same all across the board.

Thanks,
Ashley:)

md2lgyk 11-28-2012 11:27 AM

The requirement isn't the same everywhere. Where I live (and most places I suspect), lag bolts can be used. When I did a Habitat for Humanity build in North Carolina, the deck had to be through-bolted to the rim joist.

For general information and requirements for residential decks, download the Prescriptive Residential Deck Construction Guide at www.awc.org/publications/dca/dca6/dca6.pdf

woodworkbykirk 11-28-2012 02:22 PM

lag bolts or carriage bolts are pretty much standard practice
the only issue that arises with carriage bolts is accessiblity on the inside of the floor rim joist for the house.. you cant always get at the carriage bolt on the inside to tighten the nut on them so lags are used instead.. for a lag bolt it has to be a minimum of 1/2" diameter and usually 6" long sometimes 8"

joecaption 11-28-2012 04:25 PM

Make it free standing and there's not going to be any damage to the home.

Fix'n it 11-28-2012 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1062518)
Make it free standing and there's not going to be any damage to the home.

BINGO ! thats what i am going to do.

scottktmrider 11-29-2012 07:07 PM

http://www.fastenmaster.com/details/...-fastener.html

I used these on the last couple decks i built they work great just run them in with an impact.

analogmusicman 11-30-2012 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottktmrider (Post 1063249)
http://www.fastenmaster.com/details/...-fastener.html

I used these on the last couple decks i built they work great just run them in with an impact.


well,that's interesting! I never really thought about how my deck is attached to the house. I imagine that since this house was built 30+ years ago,the ledger board is probably just nailed into the rim joist. sounds like a good idea to get some of those "fastenmaster" screws and secure things well.

tnx,

scottktmrider 11-30-2012 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by analogmusicman (Post 1063924)
well,that's interesting! I never really thought about how my deck is attached to the house. I imagine that since this house was built 30+ years ago,the ledger board is probably just nailed into the rim joist. sounds like a good idea to get some of those "fastenmaster" screws and secure things well.

tnx,

There not like lag bolts where you have to drill a pilot and than have an electric impact to put them in.They work great for hand rails too.If you noticed they meet any code standards.

md2lgyk 12-01-2012 07:09 AM

Yes, those are great. They are what I used on my decks. Home Depot carries them.

joecaption 12-01-2012 09:08 AM

I never fasten a ledger directly to the side of a house.
Instead I remove the siding, install Storm and Ice Shield to the wall.
I use 1 X 6 X the width of the rim joist vinyl lumber as shims to get the ledger out away from the wall.
Then you can use Strom and Ice, wide window tape, bendable vinyl flashing, copper to flash from the wall out over the ledger.
Then reinstall the siding.
Never install the decking tight to the siding.
Never have the decking any closer then 4" to any door openings. If the deckings even with any threshold you will be dealing with water getting in under it.

hand drive 12-01-2012 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1062333)
The requirement isn't the same everywhere. Where I live (and most places I suspect), lag bolts can be used. When I did a Habitat for Humanity build in North Carolina, the deck had to be through-bolted to the rim joist.

For general information and requirements for residential decks, download the Prescriptive Residential Deck Construction Guide at www.awc.org/publications/dca/dca6/dca6.pdf


through bolts ( 5/8" minimum) here in NC have been mandatory for quite a few years, lags have a tendency to reverse themselves and get loose in the hole when they move around...

woodworkbykirk 12-01-2012 12:20 PM

[quote=hand drive;1064212]through bolts ( 5/8" minimum) here in NC have been mandatory for quite a few years, lags have a tendency to reverse themselves and get loose in the hole when they move around...[/quote

wouldnt carriage bolts do the same thing or are you putting loctite on the threads of hte bolt or doing a lock nut method by installing two nuts on it



and joes right about having the decking at the same height as the door threshold.. the detail i use is to use say a 2x12 ledger thats kept down 2 or 3`from the threshold which gets flashed. then the joists themselves are 2x10`s that are installed with the bottoms flush with the bottom of the ledger which creates a kick board per say so if your shovelling snow off the deck your not slamming the shovel into the siding which can damage it

joecaption 12-01-2012 06:10 PM

I once again use 3/4" vinly lumber under any thresholds.
It fully supports it, and does not stick out past it.
I've seen at least a dozen subfloors rotted out from someone using a 2 X anything under a doors threshold. It sticks out just enough to form a funnel to direct water under it.

woodworkbykirk 12-01-2012 06:38 PM

good call, the vinyl isnt porous either like wood that can draw moisture through it. ive done this as well usually when the layout for the courses of siding would work out creating an odd reveal. its especially a good idea for vinyl siding jobs if only a thin strip has to fit in between the door and deck

firehawkmph 12-01-2012 09:33 PM

I don't remember the exact time, but around 10-12 years ago, decks were falling off brick buildings in Chicago, second floor level. Then everyone started questioning ledger fastening. The magazine "Journal of Light Construction" did an excellent article detailing different ways to fasten ledgers. A lot more hardware was used than people thought. Before that, guys just seemed to wing it. Proper flashing was also included in the article.
Mike Hawkins:)


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