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-   -   Deck Advance (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/deck-advance-188317/)

Dinggus 10-09-2013 02:36 PM

Deck Advance
 
So, I'm assuming it'll cost less to build a deck for a patio than putting in a paved patio. I was quoted $3500 for a paved patio. My question is, what do I need to do to build a deck, I have about 4in clearance from the ground to where my door opens up freely. So, my wife mentioned we could just get 2x6's and lay them down then build off that.

All the DIY guides I've seen don't do that and use cement blocks. But with 4in of room of work with, do I really need them?

Would this work if I needed cement blocks?
http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/how...dex.html#step1

md2lgyk 10-09-2013 02:52 PM

Tell your wife to get back in the kitchen where she belongs. But seriously, your questions says you know absolutely less than nothing about deck construction. By code, the surface of the deck must be below the door opening (typically 4 inches or so). Unless You're planning a sunken deck, you don't have room for one at all.

joed 10-09-2013 02:52 PM

2x6 is 5.5 inches thick so you will not be low enough for the door to open.

Dinggus 10-09-2013 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1251517)
Tell your wife to get back in the kitchen where she belongs. But seriously, your questions says you know absolutely less than nothing about deck construction. By code, the surface of the deck must be below the door opening (typically 4 inches or so). Unless You're planning a sunken deck, you don't have room for one at all.

No need to be disrespectful with the wife comment.

Do I need to do what code suggests?

joecaption 10-09-2013 03:09 PM

And a wooden deck should not be built that close to the ground. It needs air flow under it or it's just going to rot out.
If the deck or patio is to close to the threshold waters going to make it's way under the threshold.
Get at least three different quotes, but make sure there comparing apples to apples using the same make and style pavers.
There's a whole lot of prep work required to build a paver patio that's going to stay flat over the years.

md2lgyk 10-09-2013 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dinggus (Post 1251523)
No need to be disrespectful with the wife comment.

Do I need to do what code suggests?

No disrespect intended; I obviously do not know your wife. Just my sense of humor at work (unsuccessfully, apparently).

Do you need to do what code says?? Well, that depends on what you're willing to risk. In many places, decks require a building permit and inspections - do something wrong and you don't pass until it's fixed. If you require a permit but decide to build your deck without one, you risk having to tear it out if you're caught. Building permits are usually required to be posted so they can be seen from the street. Guess why - so inspectors driving by can catch scofflaws and nosy neighbors can turn you in (both do happen). Also, unpermitted work can cause problems for you if you ever try to sell your house.

As to the specific height issue, it's a requirement for a good reason. It prevents water on the deck from running into your house through the doorway.

joed 10-09-2013 07:14 PM

The other option(not a very good one) is a pad at the door and a step up to the deck.

Dinggus 10-09-2013 08:26 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Sorry had to say something because the wife was next to me reading it, she laughed though and so did I, lol.

Not much room then to build a deck, lol.

Attachment 76637

joed 10-09-2013 09:13 PM

Concrete pad or interlocking stone is about your only options there.

Dinggus 10-09-2013 10:41 PM

Which one is more cost friendly? Everyone that quoted me on a patio like what is already started, is wanting $3k+ for 12x16ft.

joecaption 10-09-2013 10:49 PM

Why not build it yourself?

Dinggus 10-09-2013 10:58 PM

To be honest, afraid of how it'll turn out. And get confused on the whole process:

1. Remove grass
2. Dig 6 inches down (correct?) to make slope (how far down??)
3. Pack the dirt
4. Lay gravel
5. Pack gravel (?)
6. Lay sand and level
7. Lay brick
8. Pack brick
9. Lay sand on brick and sweep

joecaption 10-10-2013 12:16 AM

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=...ideo&FORM=VDRE

Dinggus 10-10-2013 08:18 AM

Thanks, I know how to use the internet. Last time I came to this forum, it was helpful.

GBrackins 10-10-2013 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dinggus (Post 1251717)
Which one is more cost friendly? Everyone that quoted me on a patio like what is already started, is wanting $3k+ for 12x16ft.

even if a deck is less cost than a paver patio it will be money thrown away, as joe said it will have issues with rot. 2x preservative treated wood is not normally for ground contact so it will not last as long. you'd have to special order ground rated 2x which is more expensive than what you'd walk out with at the Orange Box or other box store, or even a typical lumber yard.

it will also cause the joists to twist since there will be insufficient ventilation under the deck. the bottom of the joists in contact with the ground will absorb moisture and expand, the top exposed to the sun will dry and shrink which in turns causes the joist to twist and cup.

one option not mentioned is placing a concrete slab. it can be stamped and/or stained or left plain. you could install pavers on top of the slab, which could be done in the future when you have the money.

food for thought .....

Good luck! :thumbsup:


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