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Old 03-16-2011, 01:55 PM   #16
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


Judging from your photos, I'd put in a 2 foot high retaining wall,slightly leaning into the bank, consisting of poured concrete with rebar, two pieces in the wall and two in the footer. Getting concrete there may be a problem and the supplys will run you about 700 bucks plus digging and labor. You can pour the footer and wall at the same time.

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Old 03-16-2011, 02:09 PM   #17
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


organick

You were posting while I was typing.

The wall would not need be built at the property line and would not need to be 9 ft high. bernieb is right about the wall, maybe somewhere between 2 and 3ft. And if you live in a mild climate, a poured concrete wall would be a great way to go.

Don't even think about subsurface pipes, french drains, or gravel filled ditches. Go with surface flow across grass for no erosion and no maintenance.
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:15 PM   #18
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


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i am not totally understanding the retaining wall concept. Why would that cause drainage? plus thats immense cost to run a 9 ft high retaining wall about 65 ft and remove a huge chestnut tree.

That hill continues up beyond the tree line for a good bit and there is a small road there that drains off to the side.

I also dont really like the idea of weep systems, its allowing water in still. Granted its where you want it but its still inside.

I had really thought the ditch should be lined and filled with gravel as well but several others disagreed with that approach so I am lookng for more info on it.

many thanks


A retaining wall built correctly has drainage setup behind it, with pipe and plenty of gravel. I had a 4' wall for 90' (actually 2-45' walls) built for $3200 and they did it in one day.

An exterior weeping system does not allow the water inside.

They haven't given good reason for it not working. Look up drainage tile, and you'll find pvc pipe at the bottom of gravel. The ditch will work.
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Old 03-16-2011, 02:51 PM   #19
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


ok so I am trying to picture this right. The wall would be where the hill bottoms out? or does it cut out to a point where it is 2-3 ft high and the wall goes there? Then the solid wall captures all draining water and redirects downhill??

How would a wall work since I have 2 sides of the house with issues? A wall in no way could possibly go in the back without HUGE changes to the whole scenario.

thanks guys
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Old 03-16-2011, 03:21 PM   #20
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


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Old 03-16-2011, 03:31 PM   #21
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


It would nice if you had a transit, not only to find the pitch on the house side of the poured wall, which will be back- filled on the outer side of the wall with dirt, grass, so as to flow away from house and away as not to cause any flooding to your house. The area between wall and house should be graded so that surface water drains one way or the other. If you do go with a poured wall so to speak, just pier down with a post hole digger as deep as you can get, every 12 feet, under the wall. If this is your first wall pour, buy the looped wire from the concrete people and you can even rent wall panels, and rods that go through the loops.But above all ,and this is very important, concrete excerts thousands of pounds of pressure outwardly and no ammount of outside lumber bracing will hold it back. Yes, I learned the hard way. All it takes is guts and blood to do your job, plus a little ignorance on pain.
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Old 03-16-2011, 04:36 PM   #22
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


yes ,that picture of plsxx tells it all ....good job
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Old 03-18-2011, 08:13 PM   #23
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


I have to be totally honest, after doing some research on the idea I think the wall is just overkill and leads to other potential issues in my circumstance. I do appreciate the input. I still like the idea of dealing with the surface water because I think its the majority of my issue.

I am thinking sort of a surface drain/french drain idea. Basically dig out a ditch to the needed depth and regrade between it and the house. Line the ditch with corrugated pipe or other water proof material then lay a geomat type material, fill with gravel and wrap the whole thing with the geomat as thye do in french drain systems. I am thinking that give easy drainage, wont be a collection area for water soak in and the geomat should hopefully keep it from backing up with silt. Cover that with a few inches of soil and seed it.

Open to comments.

thanks again
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:07 AM   #24
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


I thought you might choke on doing the wall. Remember I said you could drain the area without the wall. If you dig it out right and slope it to the front you can keep the water off the house. And if the surface grade is done right, the trench and pipe wonít add any additional benefit. And if you donít do the grading right the pipe will only handle very moderate rains. Without the wall you will have to dig more dirt and a lot more of that dirt will have to taken to another site.

I also said you would probably grow to hate the slope without the wall. Do you like mowing it now? It is going to be a lot steeper after you do the re-grading. And if not grassed, that slope will be an erosion problem.

If I were a house builder finishing up new construction on your lot I would skip the pipe and leave you to fight the resulting slope. If it were at my house, it would get the wall. What I would not be doing is that stupid trench and pipe.
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Old 03-19-2011, 01:23 PM   #25
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


a french drain is used where you have lots of surface water (spongy grass with pools of water, like a soccer field) and no place for the water to go. In your case, the water would probably just run right over the top of the french drain and continue on its path
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Old 03-19-2011, 03:12 PM   #26
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


Pls.....i think the wall is overkill and I also have a huge chestnut tree in the path and the wall does nothing for the back yard. I will have way more erosion issues cutting down a tree on the slope. As for mowing that slope it cant happen already, its way to steep. I have the front grade basically going with me already so the main issue is keeping off the house.

I'm not choking anything its not like I am afraid to build a wall, i just dont see it being a great option in my situation with all things considered. a new construction would never even be allowed without grading issues addressed.

Jimmy, that is exactly what i have when it rains hard sitting water a foot from my house. Its mainly only an issue with big rains or snow.

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Old 03-19-2011, 03:57 PM   #27
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dealing with exterior slope towards house.


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Jimmy, that is exactly what i have when it rains hard sitting water a foot from my house. Its mainly only an issue with big rains or snow.

Thanks

well dig a big trench about a foot wide. Try to keep it sloped at the bottom. after you've got it going where you want, put landscape fabric (make sure you get some fabric that drains easily in the trench. so the sides are draped up and out the trench. Put in a drain pipe with holes in it, then back fill most of the trench with drain rock. Then fold the fabric into the trench and fill the remainder of the the trench with about an inch or two of top soil. (mixin in some pearlite with the soil wouldn't hurt either)

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