DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Cracked cement floor in garage. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/cracked-cement-floor-garage-39051/)

gante 02-24-2009 10:51 AM

Cracked cement floor in garage.
 
At my new house, the garage cement floor is cracked through the middle of the garage. One side may have shifted up to 1/4 inch in comparision to the other side of the crack. What is the best way to fix this and that will last other than removing the whole floor and adding new cement?. I was told to grinde the higher side down and patch it. Will this last?

yesitsconcrete 02-24-2009 08:10 PM

there's probably no construction / contraction / expansion jnt down the middle like in mine :( so i gots a crack, too :furious: topping that, we've got expansive soils in atl, ga, [ clay - you should see the bsmt exercise room :censored:

i'm grinding the high side & acid-staining but this is our work & i'm not concern'd my work won't last :thumbsup: at my age, i don't often buy ripe bananas, either :laughing:

vsheetz 02-24-2009 08:33 PM

I think 1/4" is not just a stress crack, rather the slab is moving. I would think you should contact a foundation contractor experienced in remedial repairs - if the movement continues, there is no lasting fix for the crack, it will continue to widen.

yesitsconcrete 02-25-2009 04:12 AM

never heard of a ' stress crack ' in 36yrs,,, yes, it crk'd because of stress - the real question now's not so much why but how to repair it as i understand the post.

simple physics - ALL concrete moves - its a solid & reacts to temp inversely as does liquid to the same force - ie, when conc's HOT, it expands ( hgwys ' blowup ' ),,, when wtr's cold, it expands ( ice ),,, when conc's cold, it contracts - hence, jnts & crks widen.

not sealing exercise room crks,,, my acid-stain'll react differently w/crks than it will w/unblemish'd conc,,, the crk's always-present moisture level creates interesting results w/the mineral salts in my mix but that's the artistic side,,, the other side says sawcut, backer rod, & sealant/epoxy of my choice for the task at hand ( i'd pick polysulfide - it resists hydrostatic pressure AND will ' take ' color ! )

far's experts, 1st guy mentioning hydraulic cement's out the door :laughing: you won't stop the crk as its already there; you can't hide it unless you pile stuff ' on top of it; you CAN repair/seal it w/this accept'd repair method,,, look for intersecting crks not easily visible to the untrain'd eye - slight crks that ' hold ' moisture when the rest of the floor's dried,,, conc's still undergoing stress ( that word again :) ) & won't be satisfied til its square horizontally relative to its thickness as a genl rule,,, if crks're already there, live w/it UNLESS: 1, you're positive the cracking'll lead to total destruction; 2, you've got loads of spare $$$; or 3, you're anal w/VERY good credit :thumbsup:

' bailout ' is a 4 letter word !

buletbob 02-25-2009 06:15 AM

you said your new house. Is it a one or two car garage?. another theory is that when the foundation was dug the center of the garage was not excavated ( very common ) just the foot print of the foundation was dug. the footings were set and poured and then the wall installed. it sounds as tho when they back filled the inner walls they did not compact it . and what is happening now ,is the soil is settling and the slab is settling with it from the weight of the car, the center of the garage soil was not touched there for will not sink and is acting as a fulcrum. I have seen this on many of homes. The repair method that I have used was a slab jacking company, And to rip the old slab out and pour a new one. and some customers opp out and leave it alone. This is also very common when they install walkways close to the foundation wall. it has a tendency to sink, pitch back to wards the foundation letting water pool along the house. Hope this was of some use to you. Good luck BOB

gante 02-25-2009 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 236368)
you said your new house. Is it a one or two car garage?. another theory is that when the foundation was dug the center of the garage was not excavated ( very common ) just the foot print of the foundation was dug. the footings were set and poured and then the wall installed. it sounds as tho when they back filled the inner walls they did not compact it . Good luck BOB

Very possible. This is a two car detached garage and the crack is somewhat in the middle parallel to the cars parked inside, but I am not sure if this garage had seem much "car" activity since it seems to be that at least the previous owners used it more for storage purposes. Again, we do not know how old that crack is.

I guess there is no "easy" fix to this cosmetic problem and I do not intend to pay for new concrete for now. I will leave it alone for now.

Greg

buletbob 02-25-2009 03:08 PM

AH! So its not a new house! just new to you. But this still might pertain to you. Good Luck. BOB :thumbsup:

yesitsconcrete 02-26-2009 06:54 AM

you gotta be kidding - no easy fix ? ? ?,,, 1st place, unless you repair the crk, damage'll increase; 2nd, if you repair as i post'd, the cost'll be under $100 incl mtl & tool rental; & 3rd, if you're in a freeze/thaw area, damage may be geometrically more than anticipated in #1,,, the crk's there because no contraction jnts were originally installed/cut/sawed.

then again, its YOUR house, not mine ! ! ! :whistling2:

gante 02-26-2009 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 236629)
AH! So its not a new house! just new to you. But this still might pertain to you. Good Luck. BOB :thumbsup:

Sorry for the misunderstanding. It is not a new construction. I was build in 1948.

As far as the crack I was looking at it a bit closer and it looks like I may have exaggerated on the verticall displacement of 1/4". Although it is desplaced horizontally to the point that you may be able to insert a pencil in between the crack at some points. I will be looking into patching the crack and see how that goes.

jogr 02-26-2009 12:55 PM

So basically one fairly level crack up to 1/4" wide in a 60 year old concrete garage floor - I'd say you got a pretty decent floor. Use one of the good concrete caulks and seal it up pretty. It will keep water out (eliminates a lot of potential problems). The slab should last another 60 years.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:04 PM.