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-   -   Is coupling top plate necessary? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/coupling-top-plate-necessary-1272/)

Rufer 11-08-2005 12:31 PM

Is coupling top plate necessary?
 
Hello,
I'm trying to reasonably soundproof my basement for a live music room. The plan I have is to almost make a room within a room with three layers of drywall on each wall. I say "almost a room within a room" because I don't plan on a floated floor--my framing will sit on my concrete slab. The frames will be between 4"-12" away from the outer shell (cinderblock) depending on the wall.

My question is this, if I were to ramset my framing into the slab and couple each perpendicular wall to each other at the corners, will this provide enough stability that I won't have to physically contact the top plate with the joists (or anything) above?

K2eoj 11-08-2005 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rufer
Hello,
I'm trying to reasonably soundproof my basement for a live music room. The plan I have is to almost make a room within a room with three layers of drywall on each wall. I say "almost a room within a room" because I don't plan on a floated floor--my framing will sit on my concrete slab. The frames will be between 4"-12" away from the outer shell (cinderblock) depending on the wall.

My question is this, if I were to ramset my framing into the slab and couple each perpendicular wall to each other at the corners, will this provide enough stability that I won't have to physically contact the top plate with the joists (or anything) above?

I think your drywall will give you enough shear provided you can keep everything square and plumb untill you can get the rock fastened. You could think about some let in diagonal bracing and some diagonals on the ceiling but I don't think you'll need it for permanent support. If you get into death metal you should go to solid poured concrete walls and lid so I don't hear it at my house.:D

Teetorbilt 11-08-2005 06:45 PM

A) I have noticed that Ramsets too close together (16-24") can cause a fracture zone in your slab. I would go with anything else, lead shields being my first pick.

B) there is a way to make a simple 3 stud corner. It is for exterior insulation but shold be solid in your application. Look here. http://www.hgtvpro.com/hpro/pac_ctnt...,00.html?cat=1 Look at the 3 - stud corner vid.

mighty anvil 11-08-2005 07:07 PM

HS is right, the GWB should be more than adequate to brace the wall. Be sure to use GWB screws. I recommend mounting the GWB on resilient channels (USG's RC-1 channels) for the most sound isolation for the lowest cost. If that compromises the wall bracing of the GWB, you can always brace the top of the wall with diagonal lightweight metal straps in opposite directions. The closer the angle is to horizontal the less sound is transfered by the straps. It is probably best to apply a different thickness of GWB on one side of the wall than on the other.

The key words to google for are "acoustic isolation music studio"

http://arts.ucsc.edu/EMS/Music/tech_.../teces_14.html

http://www.audioholics.com/techtips/...Acoustics.html

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jul0...aqacoustic.htm
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/category/c671

or use "noise abatement" or "sound abatement"

http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/basement.html

KenTheHandyMan 11-08-2005 09:34 PM

I'll just throw in my $.02 here, wrap the framing with rubber roofing, the kind you buy in a roll. It even stops bass pretty good. I'm gonna be finishing my attic as my studio and will be installing it on floor, walls, and ceiling.

mighty anvil 11-08-2005 10:15 PM

If you mean EPDM synthetic single-ply rubber roofing, I doubt it will do much to isolate sound. If you mean self-adhered rubberized asphalt roofing, it shouldn't be used indoors because of the smell of the asaphalt. There are self-adhering sound isolation membranes like Mass Loaded Vinyl and PVC/NBR (vinyl nitrile) closed cell foam that might make a difference.

http://soundproofing.org/infopages/flooring.htm

http://www.soundprooffoam.com/

http://www.soundproofingamerica.com/...efinitions.asp

http://www.acousticalsurfaces.com/no...ylbar.htm?d=14

KenTheHandyMan 11-08-2005 10:24 PM

Definately NOT the asphalt stuff! PVC is more like what I am thinking. I've never purchased it myself but as a musician, I've read a lot of books on studio construction and have read that rubber roofing is basically the same as the high dollar "Sound proofing" rubber. Could be wrong here of course, but maybe I'll get a sample of both before ordering.

Rufer 11-09-2005 12:03 AM

This is all great information. Thanks a lot for your help.

mighty anvil 11-09-2005 07:09 AM

I designed a professional recording studio once and the acoustic engineer's details called for a sheet of lead hanging free inside the wall to reduce bass sound. I wish I could find the drawings.

K2eoj 11-09-2005 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mighty anvil
I designed a professional recording studio once and the acoustic engineer's details called for a sheet of lead hanging free inside the wall to reduce bass sound. I wish I could find the drawings.

Sounds like Superman's headquaters.:D

Teetorbilt 11-09-2005 09:38 PM

There is some drywall like products, AcousticShield comes to mind, that are somewhat effective. I use boat materials, they are designed to quiet anything from 4 screaming turbos to the bass of a large, turning prop. Don't forget the big diesel, turbine or both in between the two. Pretty pricey but it all depends on what you want. You can't buy a Rolls for a Chevy price.

kenvest 11-21-2005 11:08 AM

also look at a product made for sound insulating cars. visit "quiet car". they sell a roll-on or brush-on product that works very well in those applications which makes it a natural for you.

good luck!

mighty anvil 11-21-2005 06:45 PM

A car is an unusually noisy environment. Reducing sound transfer a little can yield great benefits. A home is a quiet environment. Materials used to quiet a car are rarely useful for sound reduction in a home, unless, of course, you live in a motor home and you're on the highway.

kenvest 11-22-2005 10:39 AM

using automotive products in any STANDARD residential application would be rarely useful. however, it doesn't take an engineer to understand that a live music room IS an unusually noisy environment. ;)

the fact that automotive technologies are very good at reducing sound transfer is exactly the point. "quiet car", or other automotive products, used strategically, could make all the difference in an application such as this and be economically feasible as well.

good luck!


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