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Old 07-02-2007, 06:51 PM   #1
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


If I wanted to convert a single family house to a duplex/triplex, what sort of issues should I look out for?
Is it possible to have seperate HVAC controls in each all on a central system?
What would be a ballpark figure for the cost of construction/framing in the southeast assuming average difficulty?
All comments appreciated.

TIA

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Old 07-02-2007, 06:58 PM   #2
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


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Originally Posted by Showbiz View Post
If I wanted to convert a single family house to a duplex/triplex, what sort of issues should I look out for?
Is it possible to have seperate HVAC controls in each all on a central system?
What would be a ballpark figure for the cost of construction/framing in the southeast assuming average difficulty?
All comments appreciated.

TIA
Zoning and Town approval.....

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Old 07-03-2007, 07:52 AM   #3
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


Already would conform to current zoning according to the zoning maps.

Anything else or do you just approach it like any other remodel job?
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Old 07-03-2007, 08:08 AM   #4
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


If your considering a hot air heating system, you could run one boiler connected to 2-3 air handlers in a hydro-air system. Another option is to run hot water with 1 zone for each unit. It would be impossible to bill each unit seperately though.
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Old 07-04-2007, 02:12 PM   #5
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


Quote:
Originally Posted by Showbiz View Post
If I wanted to convert a single family house to a duplex/triplex, what sort of issues should I look out for?
Is it possible to have seperate HVAC controls in each all on a central system?
What would be a ballpark figure for the cost of construction/framing in the southeast assuming average difficulty?
All comments appreciated.

TIA
Can't even ballpark without seeing it and the utilities set up....
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Old 07-10-2007, 09:37 AM   #6
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


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Can't even ballpark without seeing it and the utilities set up....
What goes into your calculation of an estimate? What is your thought process?
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Old 07-10-2007, 11:50 AM   #7
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


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What goes into your calculation of an estimate? What is your thought process?
I have forms that I developed to plug in numbers: labor, materials, overages, mark up %, etc....I go over the estimated costs about 3 times to check my numbers and make sure that I account for everything.
I also include a buffer for additional misc. expenses that usually "pop up". That misc. expense is gauged by the overall cost of a project. On a $100K job, it is going to about $5 to $10K. If it doesn't come up, then that is additional profit.

Expenses:

First: What are the local building dept. requirements to alter the home into a multi resident structure. What needs to be done, and how much will that cost to bring it up to meet those requirements.

Second: Determine the costs for utility upgrades (per all code requirements). Heating, electrical, plumbing, additional phone lines, cable, etc, etc. Upgrading utilities is something that newbies always overlook or completely under estimate. I set up actual onsite appointments with my Electrician, HVAC & plumber and get hard written quotes. Always in writing. (I also have allowances for those too)

Third: I sit down and develop a time line and project layout; materials, labor etc...Figure realistic time-tables (nothing ever goes according to plan).

Fourth: Get any other subcontractor work quotes in writing (that is where experience can save you) Alot of subs can legitimately forget a step, or forget to tell you that you need to also account for this or that. Then show up and tell you that you didn't do this, or that....they'll have to do it (and it will cost extra) When we do a project, we take care of EVERYTHING...so the sub will come in and be able to "whip" thru his work with no problems, delays, or "extras charges".

Fifth: Consider ALL incidental costs: Demolition, disposal, yard, landscaping, clean up, painting, interior clean up-by hired cleaners, etc...everything possible.
I have seen so many "wanna to be contractors" who blow their overall budget and profit margin, because they didn't account for ALL the other expenses (inexperience).
Example: A section of a deck had to be removed to accomodate a new addition. (we were hired to do the build by another goof). The goof didn't take into account alot of extra things, including the costs to re-build the area of the deck that would be removed (lopped off). There were the costs of pouring new footings, framing, lumber, etc - just to properly and estically(sp) "close-off" and re-finish that end of the deck ($1500.00+)
We walked away from that job because I could see that he had clearly underbid it by about $30K to $50K. (his inexperience - He had got in way over his head, and had even taken a deposit already - and I knew he had spent it too)

To sum it up, my thought process is:

Communicate clearly with the local building dept. Ask questions to make sure that you are aware of all requirements, which allows you to keep track of all costs.
Consider realistic time frames and labor costs.
Consider and get costs of utility work in writing.
Get any other work quotes in writing as well.
Consider ALL costs to bring the project to it's actual FINAL completion.
Figure accurate amounts for lumber and materials and add up to 30% to that. (check and re-check your calculations and amounts) There are many times that I will realize on the 3rd re-check, that I forgot to account for something.
Last, figure out what portions you are willing to jump in and do if and when you get a little over budget or fall behind on your schedule. (BTW-it's impossible to stick to a firm timeline, unless you like stress)

That's off the top of my head.

Gotta run back out to work....

Good Luck...

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-10-2007 at 11:56 AM.
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Old 07-18-2010, 11:35 AM   #8
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


Would'nt you have to redo the electrical from scratch to accommodate the kitchens and all?
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Old 07-18-2010, 01:50 PM   #9
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


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Originally Posted by Showbiz View Post
Already would conform to current zoning according to the zoning maps.

Anything else or do you just approach it like any other remodel job?
Just a warning: you still need to submit a zoning application. No matter what the map says, you're changing the use of the structure from single to multi family. Change of use, even if it's a conforming use, still warrants a zoning application.

So it may all stay in residential zoning, but the use is most certainly changing. In my state, that triggers a zoning application.
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Old 07-18-2010, 01:55 PM   #10
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


This thread is 3 years old
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Old 07-18-2010, 06:51 PM   #11
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Converting single family to duplex/triplex


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