Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-23-2009, 07:48 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Share |
Default

Converting an attic


I have W trusses and already have a plan on how to create a room in my attic which will give me a nice sized 465sq ft bed room with a bathroom and proper reinfofrcement of the ceiling when cutting out some of the "W"s.

My question is now the "flooring" of the attic space which is 2X4, I had 2 ideas;

1. To create a new floor (joists running east to west) on top of the existing attic "floor" (joists running north south), using 2X6.

2. Reinforcing the existing 2X4 attic "floor" with 2X6's on each side of the 2X4 joists. The only problem is the joists run north to south and the house is 40 ft long (north south).

Any Idea's

nelsonjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 07:51 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Converting an attic


You can't cut trusses without having the load/bracing/joists etc re-engineered

Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 08:09 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Default

Converting an attic


Thanks for your reply, itís not that I am just cutting them out, there will be reinforcement of the "roofing" and then a carving out of some of the "W's" to create the room. I have been looking at a few jobs that have been done this way and received some explanations on how to do it, so this is not the concern.

I am trying to figure out proper reinforcement of the Attic floor, could I create a sub floor or should I reinforce the existing floor with 2X6 or maybe 2X8s?

Thanks in advance
nelsonjh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 08:15 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Default

Converting an attic


Again, you can't guess at this
The loads need to be engineered as does the new bracing
You can't copy what someone else did & assume everything will be OK
If the houses were exactly identical AND you were able to supply the building Inspector with the engineer approval then they would probably accept it

Have you talked to the building Dept to see what they need as far as plans?
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 08:17 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Default

Converting an attic


I think you are oblivious to the reality of truss framing if you think you can successfully do what you've stated above.
What you are planning is at best ill advised, at worst, possibly negligent.
The fact that it's, "not the concern" shows complete ignorance of the dangers involved.
Ron
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2009, 08:26 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 16
Default

Converting an attic


Exactly Scuba Dave..

You can organise to have a structural engineer design your attic space for you, or a builder (general contractor) to build this for you?

With this in mind, trusses can be cut. BUT, the areas you are cutting out have to be supported elsewhere ie: the truss rafter is supported by the "W", which in turn is also connecting the bottom chord of the truss and which in many cases supports the ceiling below. See the cause and effect issue here?

If you cut one area such as the 'W", the rafter holding up the roof and the bottom chord holding up the ceiling no longer have any strength...

What do you do without taking the whole roof apart? If you are not a builder, then suggest you get a builder (general contractor) to do the work or a structural engineer to design your structure?

If it was my place, I would install new load bearing rafters along side the trusses in question (Large enough that they do not need support) and bolt and nail these new rafters to the existing trusses and the new rafters are fixed and seated to the top plate below.

The ceiling / new loft floor. I would install new timber floor joists (size will depend on span and load) that are separate from the existing ceiling joists (Bottom chord of the truss). I would then attach the old ceiling joists to the new floor joists for strength and connecting these with joist hangers or timber droppers nailed or screwed or similar.

Only then would i start carefully removing the truss supports.

I would then attach stud walls to the underside of the rafters and on top of the new floor which will also help brace and stiffen the whole structure.

Job done!

davethebuilder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Raccoons in the attic electricpete Pest Control 17 05-12-2011 04:02 AM
Recently Topped Up Attic with Blown Insulation...Now I have Frost/Condensation earthad1 Building & Construction 81 02-18-2011 12:42 PM
Converting Attic Knee Wall Space to Insulated Closet gigascott Building & Construction 7 01-20-2011 10:08 AM
Finished attic humidity? kcrossley2 HVAC 2 08-11-2009 05:06 AM
Attic Fan AND Whole House Fan PapaGnome HVAC 6 02-15-2009 02:28 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.